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The Action Thread Part Two

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Foto de ONE.

"There's no greater power than a community coming together." This story comes from Pedro Costa in Portugal. During the pandemic, he continues to work in transportation, ensuring we all have essential food supplies. Thank you, Pedro.

Got a story from the frontline? Share your story in the comments below or submit here https://bit.ly/2YkQWM3 #ONEWorld #COVID19"

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Take a break with a ONE colouring page!

Take a break with a ONE colouring page!

3 April 2020 5:18PM UTC | By: EMILY MILLER

JOIN

Join the fight against extreme poverty

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Like many of you, we’re busy looking for creative ways to enjoy our free time now that we’re spending the majority of our time at home. We’ve got book recommendations, tips for at-home activism, a great Spotify playlist to jam to, and an activist-themed word search that’s pretty challenging.

If you’re looking for something relaxing, we’ve created these downloadable colouring pages for you to print out, share, and get creative with!

No printer? You can save these to your phone and colour them in on your Instagram story.

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Download SDG Doodles

Download Activists Signs

Download Hands

When you’re all done colouring, post your masterpieces on Twitter or Instagram with #ONECampaign and we’ll share them!

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HEALTH

Meet the vaccine heroes saving lives

23 April 2020 3:00AM UTC | By: JANE EAGLES, MELANIE RHODES

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Tell world leaders to invest in life-saving vaccines

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There isn’t a place in the world yet to be touched by the COVID-19 pandemic. While the global health community works together to find a vaccine, we’re reminded of just how integral routine immunisations are to transforming the health of people and communities everywhere.

Right now, Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance is calling on world leaders and donors to help it continue its lifesaving work protecting communities from deadly diseases, like measles and polio, and fight the spread of COVID-19. When a vaccine for COVID-19 is made available, Gavi will play a central role in ensuring those who need it have access.

An urgent response against COVID-19 is needed. Now, more than ever, Gavi must be equipped to double down on its work to strengthen the health of the world’s most vulnerable communities and help build a safer world for everyone.

Until there is a vaccine for COVID-19, communities everywhere must continue to maintain routine vaccination when possible. Gavi works with vaccinators around the world who are dedicated to protecting children with life-saving vaccines. We’ve pulled together a collection of stories about some of these local heroes.

Madeleine, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC)

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Madeleine, DRC

It’s crucial to keep vaccines cool, which is especially difficult during frequent power cuts. With the help of solar fridges, nurses like Madeleine can carry vaccines to where they’re most needed.

Sister Sofia, Ethiopia

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Sister Sofia, Ethiopia.

In rural areas like Afar, a herding community in Ethiopia, very few children have traditionally received vaccines against measles. Sister Sofia finds families who are often on the move and convinces them to immunise their children.

Carolyn, Liberia

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Carolyn (right), Liberia

Carolyn, a widowed mother of seven from Grand Bassa County in rural Liberia, is the longest serving female vaccinator in Liberia. In her 33 years on the job, she has contributed to the survival of approximately 100,000 children within the Bushrod community outside the capital Monrovia.

Agnes and Gabriel, Nigeria

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Agnes and Gabriel, Nigeria

Lack of transportation can sometimes mean hard-to-reach communities don’t get the vaccines they need. That’s why health workers Agnes and Gabriel in Ondo State in Nigeria travel by motorcycle to help make sure that children in remote areas can access vaccines and stay healthy.

Oumi Thioune, Rural Senegal

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Oumi Thioune, Senegal

Oumi Thioune, a head teacher from Méckhé in rural Senegal, recognises that health education is a crucial part of her job. She organises immunisation sessions in her school, and recently spread the word about her country’s vaccination pilot project for HPV — a virus linked to cervical cancer.

“Every Senegalese woman knows how serious cervical cancer is. Everyone has heard about it … I was very proud they chose my school in raising awareness about the HPV vaccine — it’s so important for everyone’s health.”

Dakar’s North District team, Urban Senegal

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Dakar’s North District team, Senegal

The fast-changing population in Dakar makes it hard to keep track of children who need their shots, especially those who are not on official registers. With their blue cold storage box, Dakar’s North District team are taking vaccines to the streets. They’re finding the city’s hardest-to-reach children in the city’s suburbs to ensure their health isn’t overlooked.

Alice, Sudan

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Alice, Sudan

Without infrastructure, it’s difficult for vaccinators to reach the people who need them. Alice is a mother in South Sudan who experiences these challenges, particularly during the rainy season.

“It has been very difficult to find medicines for the children. I had to travel far to the city for them to be given immunisations, and for my fourth child, it was too late. This has made me very determined to vaccinate all of the children, and now in fact there is a clinic in our village where we can take the children for protection.”

Jonathon, Zambia

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Jonathon, Zambia

During a cholera outbreak in Zambia in 2018, Jonathan realised that community volunteers are essential to stopping the spread of outbreaks and keeping communities safe. He began administering oral cholera vaccines, contributing to about 600,000 doses getting distributed during the outbreak in early 2018.

Thank you to Gavi for providing these stories.

This blog was first published on 7 December 2018 and updated on 23 April 2020.

Tell world leaders to invest in life-saving vaccines

Every child deserves protection against killer diseases like pneumonia, measles, and polio. This only takes one simple tool – immunisation.Please play your part to support this life-saving work by fully funding Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance. With a $7.4 billion replenishment, we can help give another 300 million children a better start in life.

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The state of global pandemic preparedness
COVID-19

The state of global pandemic preparedness

18 May 2020 9:23PM UTC | By: ANNE PAISLEY

SIGN THE PETITION

Demand a Global Response to Coronavirus

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In 2005 after the SARS epidemic, 196 countries signed on to the International Health Regulations (IHR). It laid out a set of goals to ensure countries were prepared to detect and respond to public health events.

But today, no country is fully compliant.

On average, low-income countries score lowest in their capacity to prevent, detect, and respond to outbreaks, according to the Global Health Security Index, which measures the health security and capabilities of countries that signed on to the IHR. But the problem is global: high-income countries only score on average 50 out of 100.

Here are some key facts to know about the state of global pandemic preparedness.

Spending

Medical equipment

Healthcare

We need high-level political leadership and increased investments in health systems to meet the urgent COVID-19 preparation and detection needs — and to address critical preparedness gaps for the next pandemic.

Read more in our COVID-19 policy platform.

Demand a Global Response to Coronavirus

People all over the world are standing in solidarity with each other to fight coronavirus, but the virus keeps moving fast.

The pandemic will inevitably wreak its worst on the communities and countries that are least able to withstand the shock. Let’s stand with the most vulnerable whether they live across the street or across the ocean.

We are one world and it’s time to fight for humanity against the virus. Sign our petition telling governments that a global pandemic demands a global response.


Dear World Leaders,

The world needs a Pandemic Response Plan to:

– Protect the vulnerable, support essential workers, and make a vaccine available to everyone
– Support people worst hit economically
– Strengthen health systems so we’re ready if this happens again

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#PassTheMic 🎤Dr Fauci takes over Julia Roberts' social media accounts!
“We have a moral responsibility for people throughout the world … that they should not suffer more or die more easily just because of where they happened to of been born and where they live.”
On Day 1 of #PassTheMic - Dr Fauci, Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, tells us about his confidence in the human spirit and in the power of science.
Demand action now to protect everyone, everywhere now. https://go.one.org/2Zk80Cr #ONEWorld"

 

 

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COVID-19

What keeps me optimistic is the power of science

21 May 2020 12:42AM UTC | By: DR. ANTHONY FAUCI

SIGN THE PETITION

Demand a Global Response to Coronavirus

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Dr. Anthony Fauci is the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Julia Roberts interviewed Dr. Fauci as part of our #PassTheMic series.

Here’s some of what Dr. Fauci had to say in the interview. 

We’re currently dealing with a public health crisis, and the most important thing that people can do right now is listen to the scientific evidence. At the moment, that clearly indicates that physical separation is working to a certain extent. So now is not the time to tempt fate and pull back completely.

Obviously, we don’t want to stay locked down forever, because the negative consequences of that are going to be profound — even in the arena of health, because we don’t want children not to get vaccinated, or important surgery not to get done.

However, on the other hand, if you are going to “open up” or get back to some form of normality, you have to have in place the capability of being responsive when you get the blips in cases that you’re going to inevitably get. Even in areas of the country where we seem to be under good control — because people are mitigating, practicing good physical separation, wearing masks, and not going to crowded places — if you pull back, you will see more cases.

So the question is, how do you respond to them? How do you prevent a couple of blips from becoming a major outbreak?

That’s the thing that I keep pushing, because we’ve had months to get the personal protective equipment together and to get the testing at a level that we need, so we really better get it right.

A moral commitment

One of the things I believe is that although developed countries are struggling with their own responses to this outbreak, we also have a moral responsibility for people throughout the world. Sometimes when you’re in a period of stress, it’s difficult to get that across.

Although developed countries are struggling with their own responses, we also have a moral responsibility for people throughout the world.

But I don’t think we should lose that anchor of responsibility. So we need to pour resources into developing countries and start to get some infrastructure in place.

Another consideration here is vaccines. We need to make a commitment right now that when we do the vaccine trials, we include the developing world. We can’t make a vaccine for ourselves and only know how well it works for us. That’s something we really need a commitment on internationally.

I’m usually very reserved and conservative about promising anything medically or scientifically. But I think that within a reasonable period of time, we will get a vaccine. We’ve got to make sure that the developing world is right there in all the considerations.

As well as the moral commitment to do this, there’s also an enlightened self-interest. That is, if you don’t control an outbreak in the developing world, it’s going to come right around and bite you the next season.

I try to keep a delicate balance between being anchored in both realism and not making false promises, but also having a great deal of comfort and confidence in the human spirit to be able to get things done that you wouldn’t think they’d be able to do.

That is something that keeps me optimistic, the power of science and the ability to develop interventions, diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines.

But also in science, because I’m a scientist and I’m a physician and I have a great deal of faith in what one can accomplish scientifically. That is something that keeps me optimistic, the power of science and the ability to develop interventions, diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines.

It’s not guesswork. It’s a combination of real hard data and our experience and knowing how outbreaks work. For example, when I said I was concerned that if we leap-frogged over some of the check points of decreasing mitigation, that you are going to get infections that occur, I’m 100% certain because I’ve seen that in multiple outbreaks.

Now, that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t try and advance towards normalization. But if you do, you better be able to address those little blips and put them out while they’re embers versus when they become fires.

These excerpts from the interview were edited for length and clarity.

Hear more from experts in our #PassTheMic campaign, where global health experts take over celebrities’ social media channels to share the data, facts, and science we need to know to end COVID-19. Follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter for more.

Demand a Global Response to Coronavirus

People all over the world are standing in solidarity with each other to fight coronavirus, but the virus keeps moving fast.

The pandemic will inevitably wreak its worst on the communities and countries that are least able to withstand the shock. Let’s stand with the most vulnerable whether they live across the street or across the ocean.

We are one world and it’s time to fight for humanity against the virus. Sign our petition telling governments that a global pandemic demands a global response.


Dear World Leaders,

The world needs a Pandemic Response Plan to:

  • Protect the vulnerable, support essential workers, and make a vaccine available to everyone
  • Support people worst hit economically
  • Strengthen health systems so we’re ready if this happens again

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Foto de ONE.

Medical workers play a vital role in the frontline of the #COVID19 pandemic. With a #ONEWorld Solidarity Story, medical student Lulit from Ethiopia shares that we can hope for a return to normal by being united. Read Lulit's story. https://bit.ly/3aSMl73

Share your Stories of Solidarity in the comments below or submit here --> https://bit.ly/2YkQWM3
#ONEWorld #COVID19

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