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HEALTH

Why Gavi is more critical than ever

23 April 2020 9:00AM UTC | By: KATIE RYAN, SADOF ALEXANDER

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Since the start of the year, we have been advocating for Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, to make sure that people everywhere can access the vaccinations they need to live healthy lives. Now, with COVID-19 impacting nearly every country on the planet, Gavi’s work has never been more important.

“As has become brutally clear in recent months, this disease doesn’t respect borders, which is why it will take a truly global response to defeat it. … Routine immunisation against other deadly diseases like measles, polio, yellow fever and diphtheria also must continue – we cannot have two global outbreaks on our hands.” — Dr Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, Chair of the Gavi Board.

Here’s everything you need to know:

What exactly is Gavi?

Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, is an organisation that improves access to vaccines for the world’s most vulnerable children. It was founded in 2000 to “save lives, reduce poverty and protect the world against the threat of epidemics.”

Gavi partners with both the public and private sectors to achieve this mission. It works with nonprofits, advocacy organisations, governments, vaccine manufacturers, researchers and more to improve access to vaccines from all angles.

What might the world look like without Gavi?

In the past 20 years, Gavi has helped immunise 760 million children and has saved more than 13 million lives. Currently, it helps vaccinate almost half of the world’s children. Without Gavi, millions of people alive today wouldn’t have protection against deadly diseases.

The results of Gavi’s work extends far beyond the doctor’s office. Not only has Gavi helped to make the world a better, healthier place through its vaccine intervention programmes, it’s also spent the past two decades helping countries strengthen their health systems more broadly, recruit and train health workers, and improve infrastructure to make sure healthcare is accessible. Gavi’s work in these key areas will be more valuable than ever before as countries work to fight the global pandemic and eventually help with efforts to equitably distribute a COVID-19 vaccine.

What is Gavi doing to fight COVID-19?

Seth Berkley, Gavi’s CEO, says, “Health systems across the developing world face their biggest test in living memory, and Gavi is helping them to meet it.” Gavi has committed to providing an initial amount of over US$42 million in urgent funding to 30 countries, which will support countries in their response to COVID-19 by enabling them to protect healthcare workers with PPE, perform trainings, and fund diagnostic tests. Gavi is seeking to provide additional support to its beneficiary countries and funding up to US$200 million is likely be approved in the near future.

How does Gavi deliver such incredible results?

Gavi’s life-saving work is possible through a three-pronged approach:

1. Gavi finances the purchase of vaccines. The funding that Gavi receives from donors goes directly towards making sure low-income countries have the vaccines they need. It provides vaccinations for some of the most common and deadly diseases, including polio, typhoid, measles and yellow fever.

2. Gavi helps strengthen countries’ own immunisation programmes and broader health systems. When a country receives support from Gavi, there’s a clear pathway to strengthening its own health systems. All recipient countries co-finance vaccines alongside Gavi. As a country becomes wealthier, it pays more, which allows a country to build a sustainable health system that will eventually no longer need Gavi’s support. In other words, Gavi supports long-term growth in health in addition to day-to-day health services.

3. Gavi shapes vaccine markets to increase supply and reduce prices. It works directly with vaccine suppliers to produce vaccines at a lower cost to make them more easily affordable for people living in poverty. By doing this, Gavi has greatly reduced the price of vaccines and made the market more accessible. For example, the cost of fully immunising a child with pentavalent, pneumococcal and rotavirus vaccines dropped by 21% since 2015.

These three approaches help to create a sustainable immunisation programme within each of the Gavi countries.

How is vaccine hesitancy affecting Gavi?

Vaccine hesitancy — as defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) — is the delay in acceptance or refusal of vaccines despite the availability of vaccination services. WHO identified vaccine hesitancy as one of the top 10 health threats to the world in 2019.

Like so many other places in the world, a growing number of people in sub-Saharan African countries are delaying or refusing vaccines for themselves or their children. Much of this hesitancy is borne out of a lack of trust in government, the health care delivery system, and the vaccine industry, as well as misinformation surrounding common side effects after immunisation.

Without adequate levels of vaccination, communities everywhere are more susceptible to disease outbreaks.

What might the world look like if Gavi gets fully replenished?

This year, we have an opportunity to help Gavi continue their life-saving work. Gavi’s third Replenishment will take place this June, where it hopes to reach an ambitious goal of at least US$7.4 billion in additional funding.

If Gavi reaches this goal, it will be a vital step towards making vaccines work for everyone, everywhere and making sure that a COVID-19 vaccine is accessible to all who need it. The funding will allow it and its partners to vaccinate hundreds of millions more children and save millions more lives. Some of this money will be invested into strengthening health systems, which will help improve overall health care in addition to getting more people vaccinated.

What can I do to support Gavi?

Join us in making sure world leaders take action to help Gavi keep up their incredible, life-saving and poverty-eradicating work.

Add your name to tell world leaders they must fully fund Gavi this year.

This blog was first published on 25 January 2020 and updated on 23 April 2020.

Tell world leaders to invest in life-saving vaccines

Every child deserves protection against killer diseases like pneumonia, measles, and polio. This only takes one simple tool – immunisation.Please play your part to support this life-saving work by fully funding Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance. With a $7.4 billion replenishment, we can help give another 300 million children a better start in lif

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This weekend our Chernobyl Kilkenny Outreach Group should have been well on their way to Dungarvan as part of their annual Chernobyl Kilkenny Cycle. Thankfully, not only one but 7 of their amazing cyclists are able to complete this cycle virtually ❤️ Thank you Chris Kavanagh, Phily Parsons, Ger McDonald, Decky Dowling, Ed Healy, Rita Brennan & Stefan Lowe who are pedalling away to raise vital funds for the children in Vesnova 😄 If you would like to help out the fantastic Kilkenny Group by supporting their annual fundraiser, you can sponsor any of them at the following link: https://www.idonate.ie/ccikilkenny

Foto de Chernobyl Children International.

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The Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident on 26th April 1986 was the world’s deadliest nuclear disaster. The catastrophic explosion in Reactor No. 4 released radiation 200 times greater than that released by both atomic bombs that were dropped on Nagasaki and Hiroshima. This video shows the radioactive cloud over Europe between 26th April and 9th May 1986. The radioactive particles released during the explosion were blown over thousands of kilometres by the wind-proving that radiation knows no boundaries.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qeDrqvDltfM

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 Repost from Dublin CCI on behalf of those who are currently doing a virtual walk to Vesnova to raise vital funds for those who have been affected by Covid in the institution and to prevent any further outbreak 

These 9 beautiful faces Masha, Max, Anya, Natasha, Maria, Uliyana, Zhenia, Vasa & Katia represent some of our most vulnerable children in Vesnova Orphanage. They reside in Units 2 & 5 where all our children need 24 hour round the clock care. They suffer with a large number health issues and have very weak immune systems.

They also represent the reason that our Virtual Vesnova walkers are out treading the footpaths day in, day out...even in today's awful weather. They are walking to raise funds to get essential PPE, medicines and nutritional food to these and all of the residents in Vesnova to help fight off the Covid 19 infection that has hit in recent times. Without this essential equipment there is no hope of preventing the spread in an institution.....and our worst fear is that those with the most compromised immune systems will be affected and may not survive the virus.

The 10 walkers have covered 1925kms to date and are on the outskirts of Warsaw in Poland. They have the Belarusian border next in their sights. They are putting in a huge effort in a bid to help our precious children.

A huge thanks to all for the AMAZING support so far.....but if you havent had a chance, if possible please donate anything small at all to help keep the aid supply going. We would truly appreciate the support. You can click the link below and click into.any of the volunteer walkers to donate a few euro. Thank you so much. 

https://give.everydayhero.com/ie/vesnova-virtual-walkers

Foto de Chernobyl Children International.

Foto de Chernobyl Children International.

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As we shelter in place for our own safety, it’s important to remember that it’s impossible to socially isolate in a children's institution or in an orphanage. All over the world, Covid threatens the lives of people living in institutional care and children living in densely populated institutional facilities are at an increased risk of exposure to this deadly virus. That’s why CCI and Unicef are joining together in an emergency program to provide PPE, sanitizers, soaps, and medications to address the health crisis in children's institutions in Belarus.

Click on the link below to learn more about this collaboration.

https://www.chernobyl-international.com/chernobyl-children-international-supporting-unicef-belarus-in-a-united-attempt-to-fight-the-spread-of-covid-19-among-the-most-vulnerable-children/?fbclid=IwAR3E8BuW4wxEO7doZb_zKirqmSepkHCShERykd_9On5sRT0GO6KcRTrMCRs

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Following the Chernobyl nuclear power plant explosion on April 26th 1986 700,000 liquidators- miners, soldiers and fire fighters were conscripted into the Chernobyl area to “liquidate” or “blot out” the radiation released from the explosion at Reactor No 4. The heroic actions of these brave selfless liquidators saved the rest of Western Europe from what would have been certain nuclear fallout and contamination.
Down through the years, our founder and voluntary CEO Adi Roche had the privilege of meeting some of these liquidators who shared their memories of the Chernobyl accident with her. One of them was 68 year old Valeriy Zaytsyev.
Zaytsyev was an officer in the Soviet Army and on May 30, 1986, one month after the accident he received orders to go to the 30km Chernobyl exclusion zone. His duties there included burying contaminated equipment and clothing for 7 months. He came down with a high fever and after only four days blood poured from his mouth, nose and ears. In the years that followed Zaytsyev lost all his teeth and was operated on for cataracts- a condition common among liquidators. He also survived a heart attack.
Zaytsyev, determined that he and all liquidators not to be silenced and forgotten and he gave Adi his Chernobyl medal to help the world to remember. Adi has brought the medal with her to several landmark addresses and special appearances in recent years to keep the Liquidators unique story alive 34 years after the tragic Chernobyl Disaster for their plight is one which should never be forgotten.

Foto de Chernobyl Children International.

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HEALTH

5 things you need to know about vaccines

28 January 2020 11:02AM UTC | By: ROBYN DETORO

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Tell world leaders to invest in life-saving vaccines

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What’s tiny, portable, cost-effective and powerful enough to save lives? A vaccine.

Vaccines are one of the most cost-effective health tools ever invented. In Gavi-supported countries, every US$1 spent on immunisation generates US$54 in broader societal benefits thanks to people living longer and healthier lives.

There’s a lot of misinformation out there about vaccines, so we wanted to make sure you have the facts. Here are a few things you should know about vaccinations.

1. Immunisation saves up to 3 million lives every year.

Vaccines already protect billions of people around the world from infectious diseases — and we’re much further ahead in this fight than people may realise.

“Vaccines help prepare the body to fight off disease-causing germs, such as bacteria and viruses,” writes Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance. “They are like training courses for the immune system – teaching it to recognise and destroy the invaders before they can do significant harm to the body.” If global vaccination coverage was improved, an additional 1.5 million lives could be saved annually.

2. Vaccines have an incredible track record of success.

There are very few health interventions that have had such a global, life-saving effect. Widespread vaccination efforts from organisations like Gavi have helped eradicate or drastically reduce several infectious diseases.

For example, in 2019 there were only 165 cases of wild poliovirus reported — a disease for which there is no cure and can only be prevented with a vaccine. Comparatively, there were approximately 350,000 cases reported in 1988. This incredible decline of cases is due to global efforts to vaccinate children against polio. By the end of 2018, more than 112 million children were immunised against polio with support from Gavi.

3. Childhood mortality has dropped by more than half around the world.

This reduction in childhood mortality is primarily due to one key health intervention: vaccinations. Child deaths related to non-vaccine preventable diseases have only decreased modestly since 1990. In comparison, the number of child deaths caused by vaccine preventable diseases have declined dramatically — by nearly 65% — between 1990 and 2017.

In 2018 alone, Gavi-supported vaccines immunised 66 million children. More children than ever are protected with immunity against preventable infectious diseases which paves a path forward for children to grow up and become healthy, productive adults.

4. Vaccines defend against antimicrobial resistance.

This is just a really fancy way of saying that immunisation stops people from getting infected with vaccine preventable diseases, therefore reducing or preventing the need for antibiotics. Making better use of existing vaccines and developing new vaccines are two important ways to tackle antibiotic resistance and reduce preventable illness and death.

5. Vaccines are a gateway to primary health care.

Beyond immunisation, there are knock-on effects that occur when parents bring their children in for vaccinations. Getting vaccinated brings families into contact with the healthcare system five or more times in a child’s first year of life. Regular interactions with healthcare professionals provide an opportunity to educate new parents about more than vaccines. For families living in poverty, this can be a crucial opportunity to discuss other crucial health topics, such as non-communicable diseases or malnutrition, or take part in other priority health interventions, like HIV testing for mom and baby. Often, these parents may not have access to these services otherwise.

Here’s a bonus: Vaccines don’t just save lives, they help fight poverty too. By 2030, vaccines will help prevent 24 million people in the world’s poorest countries from slipping into poverty by keeping populations healthy and able to attend school, work and provide for their communities.

Tiny vaccinations pack a mighty punch. That’s why we’re dedicated to making sure everyone, everywhere has access to them. This year, world leaders will have the opportunity to help Gavi keep up their incredible, life-saving and poverty-eradicating work.

Join us and tell world leaders they must fully fund Gavi this year.

Tell world leaders to invest in life-saving vaccines

Every child deserves protection against killer diseases like pneumonia, measles, and polio. This only takes one simple tool – immunisation.Please play your part to support this life-saving work by fully funding Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance. With a $7.4 billion replenishment, we can help give another 300 million children a better start in life.

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