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Is it allowed/weird/dumb to have a GoPro in the RED Zone?


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The camera policies probably vary somewhat from venue to venue.  The band will give their list of what is and what isn't allowed, and then local security will either enforce that as written, or unofficially add or subtract things as they want.  I don't go to as many concerts in general as I did ten years ago, but even then, I can't tell you how many times a band's official website might say that cameras are okay, and then you show up, and the local security isn't letting anything in and they just don't care what the website says, and then threaten to eject you for asking if there's a supervisor you can talk to.  So the bottom line is, GoPros could be allowed, or not allowed, but it'll really be up to the security people at the gate (whether or not its supposed to be).  In general, U2 in the past have officially allowed small cameras with non-detachable lenses.  Officially, the guidelines from previous tours specified that they had to be still cameras.  I don't think anyone got a camera taken away because it was a still camera that also had a video function, but since a GoPro is more clearly a video camera, that might raise a red flag.  If you have a professional camera, or an amateur camera that has detachable parts, they are more likely to stop you than if you had a tiny camera. 

 

But I think the larger question is, how will you using a GoPro affect everyone around you? 

- Will you be blocking the view that people have?  If you're on the floor, it's almost impossible not to - even if one doesn't hold his camera as high over the head as possible, it's the sightlines between people's heads and bodies that many fellow audience members rely on, and people holding up cameras even to shoulder height can be the difference between people behind them seeing or not seeing.

- Does the camera put out a lot of light?  A flash or camera light is obviously a no-no, but does the camera have any other light?  Does it have a viewscreen on the back that you look through?  Those things throw off a lot of light and most people using them remain oblivious to that.  U2 uses very sophisticated lighting design; they've spent millions of dollars to get light cues to complement and enhance the performance at every step, and every time your device throws off some light, you're interfering with the show that the band has designed.

- Does the camera make any noise?  In theory, digital cameras should be silent, but many of them come with preprogrammed sounds to mimic an analog camera. There's no reason that a digital camera needs to make a clicking sound when taking a photo, but people using the camera tend to like the sounds because it makes it feel more like taking a photo the old fashioned way.  It's possible to turn these functions off, but most people either don't know how to or choose not to.  And believe it or not, it's entirely possible to hear the "click" sound from the camera even during a concert.

- Are you still aware of your surroundings, or are you just watching the show through your camera lens?  In theory, that shouldn't impact anyone, but in practice, people who are looking through a lens aren't looking at their surroundings, which makes them more likely to bump, trip, fall, push or shove you during the show.  Since smartphones took over everything, the amount of drunken idiots that have bumped into me during a show has stayed the same, but the number of sober people bumping into me as increased dramatically.  A drunk person will probably apologize for bumping into you if they realize they did it.  A person taking photos will just get mad at you for existing.

 

One of the most unpleasant experiences I've ever had a U2 concert was during the I&E tour, when the band started to play All I Want Is You, a song that I had never heard them play live before and had wanted to hear for ages.  The woman in front of me whipped out her phone, held it over her head completely blocking my view, and then started leaning on me to steady herself.  She felt completely entitled not only to her space but to mine, and use of my body, and didn't care at all that she was being so rude.  I see more and more of this type of behavior when people try to use cameras during the show, especially when they're doing more than just recording their favorite song or taking a few pictures.

 

In general, I'd advise against filming at a show and especially from the floor and especially from the Red Zone.  It's too easy to disrupt other people's positive experiences without even being aware of what you're doing, and your $350 Red Zone ticket does not give you the right to make my $350 Red Zone ticket worthless.

 

I realize this may be a minority opinion, but unfortunately, I've had too many bad experiences with amateur photographers and videographers at shows.

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The show I was at in the RZ last the guy standing in front of me to my left filmed the whole show... On his phone. I don't think he saw any of the show with his own eyes and the people behind him were annoyed. I found the constant light reflecting from his phone to be very distracting. A lovely (really) serious security guard was right in front of us and didn't say anything. I think a go pro would be way less annoying. But, they always release a DVD. I say enjoy the moment you paid $350 for, snap two or three good pics on your phone and buy the DVD. :)

 

I so endorse this post. My new dislike, boarding on hate, is people who hold up a phone in front of me for extended periods. I usually tolerate a few snaps now and then throughout the show, but good grief - it has become out of control. The last concert I attended - Foo Fighters- I told the gal (very nicely) "hey, why don't you watch the show with your eyes and enjoy the moment, cause it won't again. You will be able to go online and find 1000s of pics from this very concert posted but you are not getting the eye to brain live connection ever again". She paused, thought for a minute and then said "you know what you are right". Put away her camera and proceeded to jam her ass off to the music instead of trying to take pictures. Thanked me after the show actually. Good moment. 

 

 

Oh my Gosh, I wish had been less shy and said something because it was massively annoying. I had flown in from Dallas on a 5 am flight that day and the light was so obnoxious to my tired eyes. But shyness and fear of starting a confrontation as a solo female alone 800 miles from home kept me from being as assertive as I should have been because he filmed the ENTIRE show. I mean the whole damn thing. Holding his phone in the air from the front barrier of the RZ. The. whole. show. Next time I will say something.

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I don't think anyone has mentioned this, but there's a serious motion sickness potential for anyone who tries to watch your playback...trying to stand still to film U2 in that energy will be completely impossible.

 

I agree with Jason; Your head moves around so much, that anything you record will be difficult to watch.

 

When we are moving around in real life our eyes/inner ears/brain work together so we don't even realise how much our head moves.

 

And a GoPro had such a wide angle that unless you're on the stage; most of what you record will be very small

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Bell ends holding their phones up infuriate me its all part of the look at me social media obsession .Just enjoy the show and stop spoiling it for others behind you .I took a water pistol last time and it worked they were not up long in front of me

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I hated that the band's official website and social media encouraged people to text/tweet/film during the show.  Compared to every other U2 show I had seen prior to the I&E tour, it seemed like a large portion of the I&E audience was more interested in taking pictures or selfies or videos or texting or trying to tweet their message to get it onto the big screen than actually watching the show.  In years past, Bono or Edge could lean out in the crowd and be greeted by a sea of hands reaching out to them, hoping for a handshake or a quick locking of the eyes; this time, it seemed like every time they looked out into the crowd, they were greeted by a sea of cellphones.

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