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Yeah...it was frustrating last night. A lot of my time watching them on the b-stage(where I was) was spent trying to peer around cellphones. At one point Bono was right in front of me and I couldn't actually see him because of an iPhone 7 Plus periscoping the moment blocking him out. It's sad I can be at the concert and have to look at someone's phone screen to be able to see what is right in front of me. I think people should take a few pictures and then just enjoy the show. 

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Even if you're not blocking anyone's view with a device, those things still kick off an incredible amount of brightness. I wish it weren't the case, but I find it hard not to be distracted by all of these tiny flashlights that seem closer and brighter to me than the stage lighting. 

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20 hours ago, vertigojds said:

Thanks Peter, it's nice not to be alone in this.

Going to a live concert used to be my very favorite thing to do in the world.  15 years ago, I was seeing dozens of shows a year, big bands, smaller bands, at sports arenas, fancy theaters and hole-in-the-wall clubs, and everything in between.  Some were standing room only that I waited hours for, some were reserved seating that I walked in at the last moment for.  

Back then, my biggest concerns going to a show were (if it was a club show) whether it would end before public transportation ended for the night or if I'd be stuck paying for a cab or (if it was a seated show) whether the seats would be too small and whether I'd be sitting next to a large fellow spilling over into my seat.  Now, it seems almost every aspect of going to a show is some form of nightmare.  Automated ticket bots and states' refusal to enforce scalping laws already in existence mean that it's a brutal struggle to even get tickets at face value.  Physically entering a venue is more difficult, from increased security requirements to the congestion they cause.  (But the security must not be that important, since one of the local LiveNation owned venues here has started what I assume will be the next trend, pay $10 extra via Ticketmaster to skip waiting in line.)  You're not allowed to bring food into most venues, but most venues now require you be there so far in advance of the start time that getting dinner beforehand is difficult, so you're probably going to be ripped off getting a quick bite to eat once inside.  And then, when you finally make it to your seats or standing room area, some jerk is probably going to be standing in front of you holding their phone over their head blocking your view.  Good luck finding an usher or a security person who will do anything at all.  (I was at a stadium concert where "no photography" was clearly printed on the ticket, and the person sitting in front of me kept turning around to take a picture of the crowd at the stadium - not the stage itself - and kept blinding me with the flash that he was setting off a foot from my face.  It took me the length of one song to find a security person, and even then, they refused to take action against this person.)  It doesn't matter if I'm seeing a cheap concert in a tiny venue or an expensive one at a large venue - no one seems to be paying attention anymore.  At best, they watch the hit single and then tune out the rest.  Whether it's taking pictures, obstructing other people's view, talking/screaming to be heard above the music, posting pictures from the show as its happening or responding to unrelated texts or emails, no one is watching the band.

When I saw U2 for the first time, in 1997, the top ticket price was $50 and everyone paid attention to the show.  When I saw U2 in 2015, the top ticket price was $350 and it felt like no one was paying attention to the show.

I would be very, very happy to trade not knowing the band's setlist until the concert is actually finished, and not seeing videos or photos until the next day or never, if it meant that I could enjoy a show while actually at the show again.

Sadly vertigojds, I believe the concert experience some of us (like you & I) have known and loved is a thing of the passed.  It has been replaced by something that was started by technology that was supposed to be be helpful--and it probably was--but there was also and intended consequence of all these smart devices, mobile apps and social media: the unending self-promotion.  Somewhere along the way, it was no longer about going to a U2 show, but letting it be known that you were at a U2 show.  Sure, it was also about sharing your experience with friends and family, but it has also been about getting Likes and growing your base of followers.  The nefariousness of this is that it has pervaded everything.  We all have been affected by this condition and it has literally changed our behavior. 

I too am guilty of this as I have a Facebook, Twitter and Instagram account (no Periscope, though).  I originally began taking pictures at U2 shows to have content for my U2 fan blog, and I actually thought that was a good thing.  But I missed a good amount of the i+e show because I was too engrossed in taking as many pictures as possible.  But you're right, I wasn't pay attention as much as I used to.  During the show last Wednesday at Levi's Stadium, it was a little sad to see how many smartphones were raised.  You could tell it Bono noticed.  I brought my camera and did take pictures (we were at Club Level) but after a certain point, I stopped.  I had to force myself to remember why I came to the show in the first place and tell myself I had plenty of pictures.  

I hope you get to enjoy the show, wherever you see them.  

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I agree wholeheartedly with all of you.  I was at the Santa Clara show, GA just to the right of the B stage. I am guilty of taking 5 pictures while a group of 4 women filmed nearly the entire show right in front of us,  I craned and twisted to see the show.  A man standing behind my husband kept hitting him in the back of the head with his elbows when he was trying to film whatever was happening.  Politely asking them to stop has no affect.  U2 concerts have always been a spiritual experience for me, since 1984, they still are to a certain degree but watching the show through or around someone else's screen and the increasing rudeness and inconsideration of the GA crowd (at least the people around us) is very disheartening.    It's not going to stop me from going of course, but I so miss the camaraderie that existed during the show. It's still there in the GA line but it seems like once you get in to the venue *poof* it's gone.

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On 5/19/2017 at 9:01 AM, bigwave said:

In defence of those who use cameras, phones, sometimes I have been at a show and really wanted others to know what I was experiencing, right there right then. I am conscious of others around me and try to be discrete, never in others faces, there ought to be some kind of protocol for your fellow concert go-ers, but who is going to enforce that? 

People get exited, and yes sometimes selfish, its your moment after all.. but that does cut both ways, for the ones not wanting to capture the moment with technology, other than that which we carry in our memory bank.

 

The bolded is the problem.  It's not about what YOU want and it's not YOUR moment.

It's everyone's moment.  Yours, mine and most importantly, the bands moment.  Lot's of what you wanted, not so much what other's around you or what the band wants.

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2 minutes ago, StinkyJay said:

The bolded is the problem.  It's not about what YOU want and it's not YOUR moment.

It's everyone's moment.  Yours, mine and most importantly, the bands moment.  Lot's of what you wanted, not so much what other's around you or what the band wants.

Try to steal it from me.

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2 minutes ago, bigwave said:

Try to steal it from me.

Exactly my point.  Which is why I am hopeful the band bans the practice.

You seem to not care how recording the show affects those around you or the band.  That's why we can't have nice things.

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Just now, StinkyJay said:

Exactly my point.  Which is why I am hopeful the band bans the practice.

You seem to not care how recording the show affects those around you or the band.  That's why we can't have nice things.

Nice things?

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On 5/19/2017 at 8:11 AM, rlj1010 said:

I recently went to two different comedy shows.  One by Dave Chappelle, and another by Chris Rock.   They both impose a very strict No-Cell-Phone rule.  Everybody is told to leave their phones at home, or in their car.   But for people who simply must have their phones on them, they are required to check their phone in a locked "Yondr" pouch.   You get to keep the phone with you, in the locked pouch, but the only way to take the phone out is to go to the lobby to unlock it.  

(If anyone is caught with an unlocked phone inside the seating area, they are ejected from the show, no refund.)

It was sooooooo refreshing to be at a show with zero phones lit up and people were actually PAYING ATTENTION, and WATCHING THE SHOW!!!

It makes more sense to use this policy for comedians as their sets are ruined if their material gets out and spoiled on YouTube.   But still, I'd love to see this start happening at concerts too.   I realize it's logistically unfeasible to do this at a stadium, but I hope this trend spreads.

I'd love to see something like this done.  And the band/management could do it, if they really wanted to (they may worry it would piss some people off).  The core issue, IMHO, as some others have said, is that it directly affects the sightlines of others around the "filming/chronically picture-taking" person(s) in question.  I don't see how this is defensible under ANY circumstances--??  Yo--Bono, U2--make this stop!  Apparently you guys don't really like this obnoxious trend either (?!)

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my 2 cents, for if it matters...

as of right now, the thread is going for 3 pages and it could very well be an eternal circle of pointing fingers to those who take cameras or phones to a show... but the issue (if there's one) will remain...

certain things are within our control, most are not - but forcing our point of view to effect a change into others may not be the solution...

I don't know what could be the way to solve it (again, if there's a thing to be solved - in the sense "number of people that are against / number of those that are for vs those who doesn't think about cameras and phones") but getting angry and yelling at others may not be the way to go...

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