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mike7man

GA tips/advice (especially given no inner circle/pit)?

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Besides the problems getting in the venue (card scanning delays, etc.), what do folks suggest re GA, strategy-wise?  How early should one line up to have a shot a being reasonably close (say, main stage, centerish, 5-10 rows/people back)?

Perhaps most importantly, this is the first GA in a long time with no pit/inner circle/ellipse, etc., right?  (A real bummer, in my opinion).  So what's it like if you're reasonably close?  Do things get super-packed?  And what about issues with going to the bathroom, etc., and getting back to where you were?  I'm worried that these and related issues will be worse/more difficult without an inner circle/barrier.  Thoughts??

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I was really surprised that there wasn't some dividing line.  When Bruce Springsteen plays at MetLife Stadium in New Jersey (where U2 will be playing this summer), for instance, he has an all general admission floor, and the fire marshal requires that the floor be divided.  I'd like to know what magical exemption there is that requires one performer to have a barricade dividing the floor, but not another one.  I'm wondering if perhaps the existence of the Red Zone somehow qualifies as dividing the floor.

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10 hours ago, vertigojds said:

I was really surprised that there wasn't some dividing line.  When Bruce Springsteen plays at MetLife Stadium in New Jersey (where U2 will be playing this summer), for instance, he has an all general admission floor, and the fire marshal requires that the floor be divided.  I'd like to know what magical exemption there is that requires one performer to have a barricade dividing the floor, but not another one.  I'm wondering if perhaps the existence of the Red Zone somehow qualifies as dividing the floor.

Local fire codes will make that determination. I will not be at all surprised to show up to MetLife next month and find a divider in the middle of the floor, regardless of what has happened elsewhere.

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As kind of a separate warning, MetLife has a history of disregarding artist policy and doing whatever the venue management wants instead. To use the Springsteen example again, he has long established procedures for GA lineup and entry, which are also circulated to GA ticket holders before each show. He did 3 shows at MetLife last summer and shows 1 and 3 followed the previously announced procedures to the letter, but for show 2, the venue disregarded everything and just did what they felt like doing, which ultimately screwed over hundreds (possibly even thousands) of fans. 

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More thoughts/advice from folks on the GA experience (now with no inner circle/ellipse/etc.)??  I'm surprised there isn't a big thread on this subject---normally folks have lots of opinions, experiences, etc.!  And speaking of which--where's the usual "master thread" from Joe Ahorro on this subject??  Joe, inquiring minds want to know...

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1 hour ago, mike7man said:

More thoughts/advice from folks on the GA experience (now with no inner circle/ellipse/etc.)??  I'm surprised there isn't a big thread on this subject---normally folks have lots of opinions, experiences, etc.!  And speaking of which--where's the usual "master thread" from Joe Ahorro on this subject??  Joe, inquiring minds want to know...

not sure if he posted it on here this time around, but its available on his website : http://onlineonthehorizon.com/ga-guide/

 

 

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The spot to be at is the Tree stage we got 2nd row there and it was awesome never have I seen them that close and they performed there quite a bit 

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On 5/21/2017 at 6:00 PM, vertigojds said:

As kind of a separate warning, MetLife has a history of disregarding artist policy and doing whatever the venue management wants instead. To use the Springsteen example again, he has long established procedures for GA lineup and entry, which are also circulated to GA ticket holders before each show. He did 3 shows at MetLife last summer and shows 1 and 3 followed the previously announced procedures to the letter, but for show 2, the venue disregarded everything and just did what they felt like doing, which ultimately screwed over hundreds (possibly even thousands) of fans. 

If it was enforced I think it would be great if tour management took over the lineup procedure.  I was looking at Bruce Springsteen's GA procedure for last year's show at MetLife(see below).  I like it.  If anyone attended I would be interested to hear how that worked out.

 2:00 p.m. – Parking Lots and Box Office Open.
 2:30 p.m. – Approximately 1,000 sequentially numbered wristbands will be distributed. Guests must be present and have
a ticket to receive wristband. Guests cannot reserve/pick-up wristbands for other guests. Once you receive a wristband,
you do not need to stay in line at the MetLife Gate; however, you must return to the MetLife Gate for the random number
selection at 4:15 p.m. These wristbands will also serve as your floor access wristbands so they should not be removed until
after the show.
 4:30 p.m. – A starting number will be randomly picked by a fan, announced and displayed on a placard at the MetLife Gate.
All fans with GA tickets and numbered wristbands should begin lining-up in numerical order in the lane labeled with their
range of numbers (i.e. 1-99, 100-199, etc.). When beginning the screening process, the fan holding the wristband that
matches the starting number will be the first in line (i.e. if #’s 1-1000 were distributed and number 818 is drawn, the line 
would start with 818, then 819, 820, 821 through 1000 then 1-817). When the starting number is announced the line
within that range will shift accordingly.
 If you arrive after the wristbands have been distributed or after 4:30 p.m., you will line-up in a secondary line that is firstcome,
first-served at the MetLife Gate. There is no place-holding (“saving spots”) in this line. One person = one spot. If you
want to enter the field with a group, you will need to be together when joining the line. The Secondary line will not receive
a numbered wristband and will be escorted to the field after the first 1,000 wristbanded guests.

Edited by afg

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8 hours ago, afg said:

If it was enforced I think it would be great if tour management took over the lineup procedure.  I was looking at Bruce Springsteen's GA procedure for last year's show at MetLife(see below).  I like it.  If anyone attended I would be interested to hear how that worked out.

 2:00 p.m. – Parking Lots and Box Office Open.
 2:30 p.m. – Approximately 1,000 sequentially numbered wristbands will be distributed. Guests must be present and have
a ticket to receive wristband. Guests cannot reserve/pick-up wristbands for other guests. Once you receive a wristband,
you do not need to stay in line at the MetLife Gate; however, you must return to the MetLife Gate for the random number
selection at 4:15 p.m. These wristbands will also serve as your floor access wristbands so they should not be removed until
after the show.
 4:30 p.m. – A starting number will be randomly picked by a fan, announced and displayed on a placard at the MetLife Gate.
All fans with GA tickets and numbered wristbands should begin lining-up in numerical order in the lane labeled with their
range of numbers (i.e. 1-99, 100-199, etc.). When beginning the screening process, the fan holding the wristband that
matches the starting number will be the first in line (i.e. if #’s 1-1000 were distributed and number 818 is drawn, the line 
would start with 818, then 819, 820, 821 through 1000 then 1-817). When the starting number is announced the line
within that range will shift accordingly.
 If you arrive after the wristbands have been distributed or after 4:30 p.m., you will line-up in a secondary line that is firstcome,
first-served at the MetLife Gate. There is no place-holding (“saving spots”) in this line. One person = one spot. If you
want to enter the field with a group, you will need to be together when joining the line. The Secondary line will not receive
a numbered wristband and will be escorted to the field after the first 1,000 wristbanded guests.


I attended all three shows he did at MetLife last summer, and I loved this procedure.

For the first and third nights, the procedure was followed exactly as described above, with one minor change.  The "pit" area holds more than 1000 fans, so while only the first 1000 arrivals were able to participate in the lottery, about 2500 people fit inside the pit (out of about 10,000 people total on the floor).  They gave out additional wristbands after the first 1000 that still guaranteed pit admission, so you knew before entering the venue whether or not you'd make it in the front area.  So more than 1000 wristbands were given out in the end, but only 1000 of those went towards the lottery.

Each night, I showed up around 4pm.  The 1000 numbered wristbands had already been claimed by that time each night, but I was able to get the secondary wristband which guaranteed pit admission.  When they let people in, I was far closer than I could have imagined - maybe ten people back?  For how huge a place like MetLife is, it seemed ridiculously close.  I had an amazing view of both the band and the giant screens onstage behind them.  It was a very orderly process.  Once you got a wristband, you were free to leave the line and hang out in the parking lot with other tailgaters - you'd lose your spot in the line but still have pit access.  I did that one of the nights and wandered onto the floor shortly before Bruce came out,and still was incredibly close - just being guaranteed to be in the "pit" area was close enough for me.

This also has the advantage of changing up who's in the front row.  Whenever there's a general admission floor for popular bands, it seems that a small minority of so-called fans with entitlement issues alway try to game the system and cut the line.  It happened with the Elevation tour with U2 in 2001, which is why U2 had the random ellipse entry policy for the Vertigo tour in 2005.  It happened with Springsteen during his 2002-2003 tour which was GA.  That really ends up being unpleasant for most people in the end.  The group that cheats usually resorts to tactics like stopping by the parking lot five days ahead of time and taping up a sign saying "line starts here" that's not authorized by the venue or artist, and then check in for five minutes once a day to "hold" their spot.  Then, fans start showing up the day of the show, are actually the first people waiting around, and then this group shows up and says they were there first and cuts the line and intimidates other people into letting them.  I'm all for making waiting on line as pleasant experience as possible - by all means, step away for a moment to grab takeout or use the bathroom.  But if you're sleeping in your own bed or a hotel room the night before, you are not "in line" during that time.  Springsteen got sick of seeing the same faces down there, who would harass fans all day long, and then turn on Bruce when he played songs he was known for like Born To Run instead of a show entirely made of obscurities.  It creates a bad vibe for the majority of fans on the floor who the cheaters have been pissing off all day, and it creates a bad vibe for the band that sees the same faces night after night who look unsatisfied and displeased for the majority of the set because it's not all obscure songs.  Once Bruce started the random entry on the floor, the whole vibe changed - you had longtime fans who had never gotten anywhere near the stage now having a chance to get close, and the atmosphere during the afternoon in the line was unbelievable (it was like everyone was about to win a million dollar jackpot).  And it also had the result of pushing the lining up time later across the board, so now you could show up at 4pm, 5pm, 6pm, even 7pm and actually have a decent spot.  Ever since Springsteen switched to this system, I've been closer than ever, waited less time than ever, been surrounded by friendlier fans than ever, and seen better shows than ever.

I wish U2 would do something similar.  I am so sick of seeing the same line cutters with their imaginary "I've been on line for three days even though I just got here an hour before the doors open" fake rules making the experience so unpleasant for everyone else.  These people act like they own the band.  They're miserable to be around during the day before the show, and they're unbearable during the concert.  Like, if you can't deal with hearing With Or Without You or Elevation or One without having a temper tantrum, maybe don't go to every show?

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