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On 3/6/2018 at 1:37 PM, Mark Bentman said:

As soon as U2 goes this way, I won't be paying.

I will not either.  That is where I draw the line.  Luckily, they have not done this.  It would surprise me if they did.

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Personally I would be more than happy for them to go without this amazing, all singing , all dancing, super LED, etc, etc screen and just have the band and maybe a less technological screen or two and

The band are now putting their name to these Platinum tickets being sold by Ticketmaster (see image at the end of my post)  and it is making me sick to my core . Of all the bands out there and as a fa

They need to get back to sensible ticket pricing the positive PR they would get out of such a move would force other bands to reconsider their questionable ticketing practices . They should take a loo

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On 3/22/2018 at 6:38 AM, Manohlive said:

We have been enjoying this band for close to forty years now.  No, it's not like the old days.  What is? 

I don't know if anything is exactly like the old days - but I've been seeing other artists for the same amount of time as U2, more or less, who have kept their pricing more reasonable.

When I started seeing Dave Matthews Band in 1999, all tickets were $35.  Today, ticket prices for them range from $50-115.  When I started seeing Billy Joel in 1998, all tickets were $37.50.  Today, ticket prices range from $65-125.  When I started seeing Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band in 2000, all tickets were $67.50.  Today, ticket prices are $75-150.  When I started seeing U2 in 1997, all tickets were $49.50.  Today, ticket prices range from $50-330. 

So, you can see just looking at U2 and looking at other arena/stadium acts of a similar pedigree that have toured in the same time periods, everyone's price has gone up.  Everyone's has basically doubled from what was available in the late 1990s.  But of that group, only U2 have a ceiling that now taps out at $330. 

In addition to U2 having a higher ceiling than most acts, U2 are also charging the highest price level for more tickets than other comparable acts do.  For U2, the $330 price level could get you a good lower level near the main stage with a full view of the screen and b-stage... but it could also get you a high row of the upper deck far away from the main stage.  Many tickets which were priced at the $80-100 price levels on the 2015 tour have been reclassified as $175 and $330 seats for this 2018 tour.

And I think one of the biggest issues is how ticketing has become extremely difficult for fans, while it remains easy for members of other privileged groups.  For example, U2.com fan club members are limited to only two tickets for the entire tour.  U2.com members pay $50 a year for this privilege.  Meanwhile, people who have a Citibank credit card may use that card to purchase up to four tickets per show, for as many shows as they would like, and have often gotten a better selection of available inventory.  U2.com fan club members have been told that tickets are so scarce, which is why there needs to be a two ticket per tour limit, but they clearly cannot be that scarce if Citibank card holders may purchase four tickets for each and every show.  It's just that someone involved with LiveNation got a bigger payout from Citibank for this privilege than the U2.com fan club was willing to pay.

 

On 3/22/2018 at 6:38 AM, Manohlive said:

I have been watching tickets and they are slowly selling-this theory that people are not buying seats because they are so expensive is not true.

With respect, I strongly disagree - there is ample evidence that shows have not been selling as expected.  Pretty much every date in the U.S. (with the exception of two or three shows) was intended to be a multi-night stand, and most of those second shows have not been added due to lack of demand.  They have added new cities that were never intended to be on the itinerary because the demand never materialized for the planned second shows.  Even if you look at a city like New York - they're playing two at Madison Square Garden, going away for one at Newark, and then returning to the Garden for a third show the following week.  That's insanity as far as tour routing goes, and no one would do that if they didn't have to - the expense of unloading at the Garden (the most expensive arena in the world to perform in), loading into Newark, unloading Newark, and then loading back at the Garden is ridiculously high.  It seems obvious that the original plan was to add a second date in Newark.  However, the first show didn't sell out, so there was not demand to add a second show.  But the tour was booked with the idea that they would play X number of dates, so the third Garden show was added to try to make up for this. 

Look back to 2015, where U2 sold out eight shows at the Garden, almost instantly.  This tour, they have three slow selling shows, plus two shows in nearby cities (Newark, NJ and Uniondale, NY) that have not sold out - so five NYC-area shows that aren't selling as expected, vs. eight NYC-area shows that sold out instantly three years ago.  Call me crazy, but I don't think New York lost 50% of its U2 fans in that time.  But many of them were priced out this time.

For every previous U2 tour, the idea behind having a large production and big screens was to make every seat a good seat, and to bring a good show to the cheap seats.  For this current tour, that philosophy has changed.  The screen is now being used to justify price increases across the board.  We see this not only in the escalation of face value pricing from the 2015 tour to 2018, but also in what seats are classified at what price level.  Seats that were $80 and $100 on the 2015 tour are now $175 and $330.  Literally the exact same seats.  For the 2015 tour, there was plenty of seating available at the $100 level or lower that featured a full view of the screen.  For the 2018 tour, if you would like a full view of the screen, those tickets start at $175.  High prices like that are extremely demoralizing to fans.  While it's true that there is a limited selection of tickets available for under $100, if you're a big fan who can't afford to spend $330 a ticket, it can be pretty disheartening to know even before tickets go onsale that you have no chance of getting a good seat.  In the past, a fan could still take comfort in knowing that there'd be an awesome production to watch even if the band was far away.  Now, even if you're in a seat far away from the band, that's no consolation because they've raised the prices substantially on seats that have a poor view of the stage but a full view of the production.

People are understandably upset about this.  There's little doubt that when the concerts actually happen, that they will be good shows, but that's besides the point.  U2's stated philosophy throughout the duration of their touring career has been that they care about their fans and put great effort into ensuring that all fans can have the opportunity to see the band live.  "Live is where we live" is something Bono was fond of saying.  But when an upper level seat is being priced at $330, it doesn't feel like the band is looking after their fans.  When the band claims to be strongly against scalping, yet embraces a ticketing platform that allows for scalping of tickets, it doesn't feel like the band is looking after their fans.  When paid members of the U2.com fan club are told there is such a limited supply of tickets that members can only get two tickets for the entire tour, but people who hold Citibank credit cards can buy four tickets to each and every show of the tour, it doesn't feel like the band is looking after their fans.  And ultimately, all of that would be fine (or at least, feel a lot less hypocritical), if they'd stop claiming that they're looking out for fans.  Just own it.  But don't pat yourself on the back for being fan friendly at the same time you're making it harder than ever for fans to access tickets.

 

 

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12 hours ago, vertigojds said:

I don't know if anything is exactly like the old days - but I've been seeing other artists for the same amount of time as U2, more or less, who have kept their pricing more reasonable.

When I started seeing Dave Matthews Band in 1999, all tickets were $35.  Today, ticket prices for them range from $50-115.  When I started seeing Billy Joel in 1998, all tickets were $37.50.  Today, ticket prices range from $65-125.  When I started seeing Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band in 2000, all tickets were $67.50.  Today, ticket prices are $75-150.  When I started seeing U2 in 1997, all tickets were $49.50.  Today, ticket prices range from $50-330. 

So, you can see just looking at U2 and looking at other arena/stadium acts of a similar pedigree that have toured in the same time periods, everyone's price has gone up.  Everyone's has basically doubled from what was available in the late 1990s.  But of that group, only U2 have a ceiling that now taps out at $330. 

In addition to U2 having a higher ceiling than most acts, U2 are also charging the highest price level for more tickets than other comparable acts do.  For U2, the $330 price level could get you a good lower level near the main stage with a full view of the screen and b-stage... but it could also get you a high row of the upper deck far away from the main stage.  Many tickets which were priced at the $80-100 price levels on the 2015 tour have been reclassified as $175 and $330 seats for this 2018 tour.

And I think one of the biggest issues is how ticketing has become extremely difficult for fans, while it remains easy for members of other privileged groups.  For example, U2.com fan club members are limited to only two tickets for the entire tour.  U2.com members pay $50 a year for this privilege.  Meanwhile, people who have a Citibank credit card may use that card to purchase up to four tickets per show, for as many shows as they would like, and have often gotten a better selection of available inventory.  U2.com fan club members have been told that tickets are so scarce, which is why there needs to be a two ticket per tour limit, but they clearly cannot be that scarce if Citibank card holders may purchase four tickets for each and every show.  It's just that someone involved with LiveNation got a bigger payout from Citibank for this privilege than the U2.com fan club was willing to pay.

 

With respect, I strongly disagree - there is ample evidence that shows have not been selling as expected.  Pretty much every date in the U.S. (with the exception of two or three shows) was intended to be a multi-night stand, and most of those second shows have not been added due to lack of demand.  They have added new cities that were never intended to be on the itinerary because the demand never materialized for the planned second shows.  Even if you look at a city like New York - they're playing two at Madison Square Garden, going away for one at Newark, and then returning to the Garden for a third show the following week.  That's insanity as far as tour routing goes, and no one would do that if they didn't have to - the expense of unloading at the Garden (the most expensive arena in the world to perform in), loading into Newark, unloading Newark, and then loading back at the Garden is ridiculously high.  It seems obvious that the original plan was to add a second date in Newark.  However, the first show didn't sell out, so there was not demand to add a second show.  But the tour was booked with the idea that they would play X number of dates, so the third Garden show was added to try to make up for this. 

Look back to 2015, where U2 sold out eight shows at the Garden, almost instantly.  This tour, they have three slow selling shows, plus two shows in nearby cities (Newark, NJ and Uniondale, NY) that have not sold out - so five NYC-area shows that aren't selling as expected, vs. eight NYC-area shows that sold out instantly three years ago.  Call me crazy, but I don't think New York lost 50% of its U2 fans in that time.  But many of them were priced out this time.

For every previous U2 tour, the idea behind having a large production and big screens was to make every seat a good seat, and to bring a good show to the cheap seats.  For this current tour, that philosophy has changed.  The screen is now being used to justify price increases across the board.  We see this not only in the escalation of face value pricing from the 2015 tour to 2018, but also in what seats are classified at what price level.  Seats that were $80 and $100 on the 2015 tour are now $175 and $330.  Literally the exact same seats.  For the 2015 tour, there was plenty of seating available at the $100 level or lower that featured a full view of the screen.  For the 2018 tour, if you would like a full view of the screen, those tickets start at $175.  High prices like that are extremely demoralizing to fans.  While it's true that there is a limited selection of tickets available for under $100, if you're a big fan who can't afford to spend $330 a ticket, it can be pretty disheartening to know even before tickets go onsale that you have no chance of getting a good seat.  In the past, a fan could still take comfort in knowing that there'd be an awesome production to watch even if the band was far away.  Now, even if you're in a seat far away from the band, that's no consolation because they've raised the prices substantially on seats that have a poor view of the stage but a full view of the production.

People are understandably upset about this.  There's little doubt that when the concerts actually happen, that they will be good shows, but that's besides the point.  U2's stated philosophy throughout the duration of their touring career has been that they care about their fans and put great effort into ensuring that all fans can have the opportunity to see the band live.  "Live is where we live" is something Bono was fond of saying.  But when an upper level seat is being priced at $330, it doesn't feel like the band is looking after their fans.  When the band claims to be strongly against scalping, yet embraces a ticketing platform that allows for scalping of tickets, it doesn't feel like the band is looking after their fans.  When paid members of the U2.com fan club are told there is such a limited supply of tickets that members can only get two tickets for the entire tour, but people who hold Citibank credit cards can buy four tickets to each and every show of the tour, it doesn't feel like the band is looking after their fans.  And ultimately, all of that would be fine (or at least, feel a lot less hypocritical), if they'd stop claiming that they're looking out for fans.  Just own it.  But don't pat yourself on the back for being fan friendly at the same time you're making it harder than ever for fans to access tickets.

 

 

Great Post mate unfortunately i feel all of this is falling on deaf ears 

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completely agree only 2 nights in London this tour. (Only 4 shows in the whole of the mainland uk) suggest demand has been low for the way overpriced platinum seats. Most casual fans aren’t going to pay 2-300 pounds for 2-3 hrs of entertainment.

I’m going twice once in London(used my presale code to take a friend who is a U2 nut and disabled), and fluked 2 GAs for Manchester 2 with album presale.

these tickets were reasonably priced, but the ‘platinum seats’ are silly money and still available.

 

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On 3/23/2018 at 3:01 PM, vertigojds said:

I don't know if anything is exactly like the old days - but I've been seeing other artists for the same amount of time as U2, more or less, who have kept their pricing more reasonable.

When I started seeing Dave Matthews Band in 1999, all tickets were $35.  Today, ticket prices for them range from $50-115.  When I started seeing Billy Joel in 1998, all tickets were $37.50.  Today, ticket prices range from $65-125.  When I started seeing Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band in 2000, all tickets were $67.50.  Today, ticket prices are $75-150.  When I started seeing U2 in 1997, all tickets were $49.50.  Today, ticket prices range from $50-330. 

So, you can see just looking at U2 and looking at other arena/stadium acts of a similar pedigree that have toured in the same time periods, everyone's price has gone up.  Everyone's has basically doubled from what was available in the late 1990s.  But of that group, only U2 have a ceiling that now taps out at $330. 

In addition to U2 having a higher ceiling than most acts, U2 are also charging the highest price level for more tickets than other comparable acts do.  For U2, the $330 price level could get you a good lower level near the main stage with a full view of the screen and b-stage... but it could also get you a high row of the upper deck far away from the main stage.  Many tickets which were priced at the $80-100 price levels on the 2015 tour have been reclassified as $175 and $330 seats for this 2018 tour.

And I think one of the biggest issues is how ticketing has become extremely difficult for fans, while it remains easy for members of other privileged groups.  For example, U2.com fan club members are limited to only two tickets for the entire tour.  U2.com members pay $50 a year for this privilege.  Meanwhile, people who have a Citibank credit card may use that card to purchase up to four tickets per show, for as many shows as they would like, and have often gotten a better selection of available inventory.  U2.com fan club members have been told that tickets are so scarce, which is why there needs to be a two ticket per tour limit, but they clearly cannot be that scarce if Citibank card holders may purchase four tickets for each and every show.  It's just that someone involved with LiveNation got a bigger payout from Citibank for this privilege than the U2.com fan club was willing to pay.

 

With respect, I strongly disagree - there is ample evidence that shows have not been selling as expected.  Pretty much every date in the U.S. (with the exception of two or three shows) was intended to be a multi-night stand, and most of those second shows have not been added due to lack of demand.  They have added new cities that were never intended to be on the itinerary because the demand never materialized for the planned second shows.  Even if you look at a city like New York - they're playing two at Madison Square Garden, going away for one at Newark, and then returning to the Garden for a third show the following week.  That's insanity as far as tour routing goes, and no one would do that if they didn't have to - the expense of unloading at the Garden (the most expensive arena in the world to perform in), loading into Newark, unloading Newark, and then loading back at the Garden is ridiculously high.  It seems obvious that the original plan was to add a second date in Newark.  However, the first show didn't sell out, so there was not demand to add a second show.  But the tour was booked with the idea that they would play X number of dates, so the third Garden show was added to try to make up for this. 

Look back to 2015, where U2 sold out eight shows at the Garden, almost instantly.  This tour, they have three slow selling shows, plus two shows in nearby cities (Newark, NJ and Uniondale, NY) that have not sold out - so five NYC-area shows that aren't selling as expected, vs. eight NYC-area shows that sold out instantly three years ago.  Call me crazy, but I don't think New York lost 50% of its U2 fans in that time.  But many of them were priced out this time.

For every previous U2 tour, the idea behind having a large production and big screens was to make every seat a good seat, and to bring a good show to the cheap seats.  For this current tour, that philosophy has changed.  The screen is now being used to justify price increases across the board.  We see this not only in the escalation of face value pricing from the 2015 tour to 2018, but also in what seats are classified at what price level.  Seats that were $80 and $100 on the 2015 tour are now $175 and $330.  Literally the exact same seats.  For the 2015 tour, there was plenty of seating available at the $100 level or lower that featured a full view of the screen.  For the 2018 tour, if you would like a full view of the screen, those tickets start at $175.  High prices like that are extremely demoralizing to fans.  While it's true that there is a limited selection of tickets available for under $100, if you're a big fan who can't afford to spend $330 a ticket, it can be pretty disheartening to know even before tickets go onsale that you have no chance of getting a good seat.  In the past, a fan could still take comfort in knowing that there'd be an awesome production to watch even if the band was far away.  Now, even if you're in a seat far away from the band, that's no consolation because they've raised the prices substantially on seats that have a poor view of the stage but a full view of the production.

People are understandably upset about this.  There's little doubt that when the concerts actually happen, that they will be good shows, but that's besides the point.  U2's stated philosophy throughout the duration of their touring career has been that they care about their fans and put great effort into ensuring that all fans can have the opportunity to see the band live.  "Live is where we live" is something Bono was fond of saying.  But when an upper level seat is being priced at $330, it doesn't feel like the band is looking after their fans.  When the band claims to be strongly against scalping, yet embraces a ticketing platform that allows for scalping of tickets, it doesn't feel like the band is looking after their fans.  When paid members of the U2.com fan club are told there is such a limited supply of tickets that members can only get two tickets for the entire tour, but people who hold Citibank credit cards can buy four tickets to each and every show of the tour, it doesn't feel like the band is looking after their fans.  And ultimately, all of that would be fine (or at least, feel a lot less hypocritical), if they'd stop claiming that they're looking out for fans.  Just own it.  But don't pat yourself on the back for being fan friendly at the same time you're making it harder than ever for fans to access tickets.

 

 

I reacted very poorly to being quoted in this post. I took this gentleman's disagreeing with my comments personally.  I wrote something which I have since hidden. I want to apologize to Vertigojds for calling him out on how he quoted me.  I love this site because we can all say what we feel and not be judged. I mistook his feelings as a personal attack. I'm impatient  for the negativity which has invaded U2.com to dissipate. We should have gotten every single GA ticket before anyone and ESPECIALLY before slimeball scalpers.  The current system sucks. The 2017 vinyls got delayed and LN's customer service via U2.com sucked yet again. I regret what I said and how I said it. I wish to apologize to the U2.com community.  I value what I write.  I value, even more, what others write. If anyone else read my reply before I could hide it-I was being a jerk without knowing it.  I needed to defend the band and fumbled at it.  Vertigojds pmd me and apoligzed.  I apologized as well.  We discussed that Zootopians are in different places with trying to heal from being disrespected fans no matter how long we've subscribed or have not subscribed but now do.  I hope all of us can soon feel 100% good about the tour without the sting of LiveNation's business practices.  

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