Jump to content

The best way to sell tickets.


u2zoo24
 Share

Recommended Posts

I've always thought of U2 as a replacement for the Stones. I can totally see them touring another decade or two. I mean the Stones have'nt releasedanything REALLY good since the seventies and thier still on top of the tour biz. U2 has huge current respect and is only growing as a band. They could flogthis horse for decades.

 

The 2025 U2 hologram tour,brought to you by Depends undergarments.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

u2zoo24 wrote:

The best way to sell concert tickets is the way it used to be done. If you loved the band you lined up for a day and a half. You got good tickets because you were first in line. Think about it. If you love a band you would camp out for them. If you don't then you can have the lower grade tickets.

 

The old system may have had people standing around on street corners but
it was fair
.

 

The best tickets went to the people who wanted them most. The die hard fans. I think most people would argue that they can't afford to be missing work to line up for tickets. The solution is simple. Tickets for large events always go on sale on a Sunday afternoon. That way you have all weekend to line up and get home on time for work monday morning. Two tickets per person. No more. I miss the old way. I got to hang out with like minded U2 fans smoke pot and get drunk on the sidewalk. Ahh Youth.

 

Who agrees that we should go back to the old way?

 

Oh Lord...let's not get all tingly with nostalgia for something that wasn't all that great--or fair--to begin with.

 

Don't know how old you are, but I'm old enough to recall the days before the likes of TicketMaster (and BASS, TicketTron, et al) took over theticketing biz.

 

It wasn't "fair." I lived in the Midwest in the 70s, and yes, fans who were determined to get a ticket had to line up at either the box office,or some local ticket vendor (usually a record shop in those days). The tickets were delivered to the stores in a box--sometimes nothing more secure than ashoebox or unlocked cash box!--by couriers for the venue/store/whoever. Which store got what allotment of tickets was a constant source of speculation, andyes, more than a few hands got hold of the best tickets long before those little boxes reached the record shops. First in line did not equal the"best" tickets--never has.

 

Oh yeah--I can only assume you live in a place with a moderate climate? I grew up in Michigan, and how'd you like to line up all day in the dead ofwinter?

 

The initial appeal of TicketTron, which I first saw on a trip to Los Angeles in 1972, was that it issued all tickets from a central source to multiple outlets. But back then, home computers were either rare or a hobbyist thing (and no Interweb thingy) , and I don't think there was much in the way of telephonesales, either (if nothing else, credit cards weren't as widespread in the 70s as in later years). Fact is, computerized ticketing, at its birth, wasmuch more "fair" than the old line-up and tough-it-out method. Of course, TicketTron and the like was initially only in a few majormarkets--TicketTron in Southern California, BASS up here in the Bay Area, and I forget where TicketMaster first spawned. So clever fans could get, say, theBASS phone numbers and order tickets for a show in Oakland, even if they lived in Seattle, but the show wouldn't be on the system that dominated ticketingin Seattle. Territory limited the number of people who were going to be competing for tickets.

 

Since that first encounter with TicketTron in 1972: Widespread use of credit cards, new telephone technology (redial functions, robo-dialers), theconsolidation of the ticketing systems (into one huge TicketBastard), and computers have all changed the way tickets get bought and sold (and scalped).

 

Sidebar: How many music fans who endorse the idea of "free" downloads and other forms of piracy, turn around and whine about how computers havef***ed up ticket buying?

 

Also:

 

--> Tickets for large events don't "always" go on sale on weekends. Example: the recent Leonard Cohen shows at the Paramount went on sale ona Monday morning (promptly sold out; third show added, and they didn't wait until Sunday afternoon to do so). How many times in my life have I tipped offfriends that a band they love had announced a surprise show and ticket go on sale at BASS or TM in, oh, 30 minutes, on a weekday? Weekend sales aretraditional, because it assumes most folks won't be working and thus sales will be maximized. But really hotshows do get dropped on, say, Monday at 10am, because it's a known sell-out. And since most folks buy by computer or phone, even work isn't a problem(unless your boss is an arsehole); I know a lot of folks who buy tickets online from their work computers).

 

--> Most of us don't have trust funds or other sources of work-free income that would allow us to stand around on sidewalks for days on end, just toget what will be (in this computerized age) a crap awful nosebleed ticket for U2. Some of us have jobs that (gasp!) require us to work on weekends,holidays, odd shifts--you know, not all music fans work M-F 9-5 at desk jobs! Other fans have families and need to buy food and run errands and, if they wereto camp out, would need to have someone come hold their spot while they go find a bathroom (unless you're all nostalgic for pissing on the sidewalk whileyou wait, in which case, you're assuming all ticket buyers are male).

 

--> Most venues and retail outlets just won't allow long-term line-ups for tickets, and haven't for years. They don't want to deal with theliability hassles, the costs, etc. And a lot of places will do line-number lotteries if the line grows too long. Also, as others have pointed out, scalperswill pay shills to stand in line to buy multiple tickets. And even if you luck out and get a line that doesn't get lotterized or gamed by the scalpers? Once you get to the counter, all the tickets will have gone pfffft already anyways--because countless phones andcomputers have also been tearing into those tickets, buying them in the few minutes it took the guy in front of you to place his order.

 

Actually, U2 did have in place a very good system for making sure their die-hard fans got tickets. It was called Propaganda. It was a rare opportunity tonot only get good tickets for U2 shows, but you would feel happy--grateful, even--at the fact that you could do so. Which, of course, means that the wholething had to be torn down and mashed to bits, by U2 themselves, in some sort of sacrifice to the greater gods of the music industry.

 

Nice one, guys.

 

-- eaplatt

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have, as they say-camped out- many times for tickets over the years and I must admit it's not always the best way. One problem is the bands/artists andradio stations all would hold the front rows so you could be first in line and say get row 12 floor. also the scalpers flooded the lines and always got whatthey wanted often with an inside person ,on the take , hooking them up.[this is 100%fact}.and some may remember this system the past 5-7 years moved to arandom bracelet # system thus some could sleepover get a bad # and the last person who came at 9am may get tix but not the people up front. Our [my friends]U2system we used was have a person about every 50 feet in line and -pray-...we at times were early wasted many hours and still got shut out..EVEN UPFRONT.....thus we yes...found the scalper.$$$$ paid the man and left.....the problem here is TICKETBASTARD...they you know....what..*******-****!

 

and while I am at it The PROPAGANDA SYSTEM worked but the band? outgrew? it ...and so it goes.......

Link to comment
Share on other sites

eaplatt wrote:

u2zoo24 wrote:

The best way to sell concert tickets is the way it used to be done. If you loved the band you lined up for a day and a half. You got good tickets because you were first in line. Think about it. If you love a band you would camp out for them. If you don't then you can have the lower grade tickets.

 

The old system may have had people standing around on street corners but
it was fair
.

 

The best tickets went to the people who wanted them most. The die hard fans. I think most people would argue that they can't afford to be missing work to line up for tickets. The solution is simple. Tickets for large events always go on sale on a Sunday afternoon. That way you have all weekend to line up and get home on time for work monday morning. Two tickets per person. No more. I miss the old way. I got to hang out with like minded U2 fans smoke pot and get drunk on the sidewalk. Ahh Youth.

 

Who agrees that we should go back to the old way?

 

Oh Lord...let's not get all tingly with nostalgia for something that wasn't all that great--or fair--to begin with.

 

Don't know how old you are, but I'm old enough to recall the days before the likes of TicketMaster (and BASS, TicketTron, et al) took over the ticketing biz.

 

It wasn't "fair." I lived in the Midwest in the 70s, and yes, fans who were determined to get a ticket had to line up at either the box office, or some local ticket vendor (usually a record shop in those days). The tickets were delivered to the stores in a box--sometimes nothing more secure than a shoebox or unlocked cash box!--by couriers for the venue/store/whoever. Which store got what allotment of tickets was a constant source of speculation, and yes, more than a few hands got hold of the best tickets long before those little boxes reached the record shops. First in line did not equal the "best" tickets--never has.

 

Oh yeah--I can only assume you live in a place with a moderate climate? I grew up in Michigan, and how'd you like to line up all day in the dead of winter?

 

The initial appeal of TicketTron, which I first saw on a trip to Los Angeles in 1972, was that it issued all tickets from a central source to multiple outlets. But back then, home computers were either rare or a hobbyist thing (and no Interweb thingy) , and I don't think there was much in the way of telephone sales, either (if nothing else, credit cards weren't as widespread in the 70s as in later years). Fact is, computerized ticketing, at its birth, was much more "fair" than the old line-up and tough-it-out method. Of course, TicketTron and the like was initially only in a few major markets--TicketTron in Southern California, BASS up here in the Bay Area, and I forget where TicketMaster first spawned. So clever fans could get, say, the BASS phone numbers and order tickets for a show in Oakland, even if they lived in Seattle, but the show wouldn't be on the system that dominated ticketing in Seattle. Territory limited the number of people who were going to be competing for tickets.

 

Since that first encounter with TicketTron in 1972: Widespread use of credit cards, new telephone technology (redial functions, robo-dialers), the consolidation of the ticketing systems (into one huge TicketBastard), and computers have all changed the way tickets get bought and sold (and scalped).

 

Sidebar: How many music fans who endorse the idea of "free" downloads and other forms of piracy, turn around and whine about how computers have f***ed up ticket buying?

 

Also:

 

--> Tickets for large events don't "always" go on sale on weekends. Example: the recent Leonard Cohen shows at the Paramount went on sale on a Monday morning (promptly sold out; third show added, and they didn't wait until Sunday afternoon to do so). How many times in my life have I tipped off friends that a band they love had announced a surprise show and ticket go on sale at BASS or TM in, oh, 30 minutes, on a weekday? Weekend sales are traditional, because it assumes most folks won't be working and thus sales will be maximized. But
really
hot shows do get dropped on, say, Monday at 10am, because it's a known sell-out. And since most folks buy by computer or phone, even work isn't a problem (unless your boss is an arsehole); I know a lot of folks who buy tickets online from their work computers).

 

--> Most of us don't have trust funds or other sources of work-free income that would allow us to stand around on sidewalks for days on end, just to get what will be (in this computerized age) a crap awful nosebleed ticket for U2. Some of us have jobs that (gasp!) require us to work on weekends, holidays, odd shifts--you know, not all music fans work M-F 9-5 at desk jobs! Other fans have families and need to buy food and run errands and, if they were to camp out, would need to have someone come hold their spot while they go find a bathroom (unless you're all nostalgic for pissing on the sidewalk while you wait, in which case, you're assuming all ticket buyers are male).

 

--> Most venues and retail outlets just won't allow long-term line-ups for tickets, and haven't for years. They don't want to deal with the liability hassles, the costs, etc. And a lot of places will do line-number lotteries if the line grows too long. Also, as others have pointed out, scalpers will pay shills to stand in line to buy multiple tickets. And even if you luck out and get a line that doesn't get lotterized or gamed by the scalpers? Once you get to the counter, all the tickets will have gone
pfffft
already anyways--because countless phones and computers have also been tearing into those tickets, buying them in the few minutes it took the guy in front of you to place his order.

 

Actually, U2 did have in place a very good system for making sure their die-hard fans got tickets. It was called Propaganda. It was a rare opportunity to not only get good tickets for U2 shows, but you would feel happy--grateful, even--at the fact that you could do so. Which, of course, means that the whole thing had to be torn down and mashed to bits, by U2 themselves, in some sort of sacrifice to the greater gods of the music industry.

 

Nice one, guys.

 

-- eaplatt

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wooo

 

That's quite the rant. First of all i never said the old system was perfect (it was flawed in a few ways) but i have always attained good tickets whenlining up for a day and a half at a window in the old days. Secondly i never said tickets go on sale always on weekends. I said if we used the old system theySHOULD go on sale on Sundays. I pointed out that people probably don't want to line up and miss work. The fact of the matter is MOST people DO work m-f9-5. Can't please everyone.Try reading the whole thread before writing such a loud response. Try comprehending what people write before you criticize nexttime.

 

I assumed when people read my thread they would be smart enough to realize i did'nt mean to go back to the exact way it used to be done. Obviously somechanges would need to be made.

 

"Sidebar: How many music fans who endorse the idea of "free" downloads and other forms of piracy, turn around and whine about how computers havef***ed up ticket buying?"

 

When have i ever endorsed downloading of illegal material? In my threads and posts i have stated that the only media that should be downloadable for free istelevision. I pay for it 3 times, therfore i believe it should be availible via the internet. (read my post on the 'bono speaks out against piracy'thread than you will truly know where i stand on dling). Many of the networks already offer full episodes of thier progrmas online.

 

I DO NOT endorse the downloading of Music,movies or software.

 

Making comments about having a job "gasp" on weekends and trustfunds and so on is just childish. For someone at least in thier fifty's, a littleimmature. I have a job and NO i dont grow weed on the side! I earn every god dammed cent i have.

 

The old system was not perfect but the new one is even more flawed. By the way i lined up in toronto overnight in november for u2 tickets once. So ya i knowwhat it is to freeze your ass off all night.

 

I also know what it is to be wrong and how to admit a mistake. Read my recent interactions with ONE01.

 

My only concern is that the best tickets go to the die hard fans. The old system was'nt perfect but in my eyes and experience it was much more fair thanwhats going on today with scalpers and after market ticket vendors.

 

We're just talking about ticket sales here not abortion. Take it easy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

u2zoo24 wrote:

eaplatt wrote:

u2zoo24 wrote:

The old system may have had people standing around on street corners but
it was fair
.

 

The best tickets went to the people who wanted them most. The die hard fans. I think most people would argue that they can't afford to be missing work to line up for tickets. The solution is simple. Tickets for large events always go on sale on a Sunday afternoon. That way you have all weekend to line up and get home on time for work monday morning. Two tickets per person. No more. I miss the old way. I got to hang out with like minded U2 fans smoke pot and get drunk on the sidewalk. Ahh Youth.

 

Who agrees that we should go back to the old way?

 

Wooo

 

That's quite the rant. First of all i never said the old system was perfect (it was flawed in a few ways) but i have always attained good tickets when lining up for a day and a half at a window in the old days.

 

Secondly i never said tickets go on sale always on weekends. I said if we used the old system they SHOULD go on sale on Sundays. I pointed out that people probably don't want to line up and miss work. The fact of the matter is MOST people DO work m-f 9-5. Can't please everyone.Try reading the whole thread before writing such a loud response. Try comprehending what people write before you criticize next time.

 

I assumed when people read my thread they would be smart enough to realize i did'nt mean to go back to the exact way it used to be done. Obviously some changes would need to be made.

 

"Sidebar: How many music fans who endorse the idea of "free" downloads and other forms of piracy, turn around and whine about how computers have f***ed up ticket buying?"

 

When have i ever endorsed downloading of illegal material? In my threads and posts i have stated that the only media that should be downloadable for free is television. I pay for it 3 times, therfore i believe it should be availible via the internet. (read my post on the 'bono speaks out against piracy' thread than you will truly know where i stand on dling). Many of the networks already offer full episodes of thier progrmas online.

 

I DO NOT endorse the downloading of Music,movies or software.

 

Making comments about having a job "gasp" on weekends and trustfunds and so on is just childish. For someone at least in thier fifty's, a little immature. I have a job and NO i dont grow weed on the side! I earn every god dammed cent i have.

 

The old system was not perfect but the new one is even more flawed. By the way i lined up in toronto overnight in november for u2 tickets once. So ya i know what it is to freeze your ass off all night.

 

I also know what it is to be wrong and how to admit a mistake. Read my recent interactions with ONE01.

 

My only concern is that the best tickets go to the die hard fans. The old system was'nt perfect but in my eyes and experience it was much more fair than whats going on today with scalpers and after market ticket vendors.

 

We're just talking about ticket sales here not abortion. Take it easy.

You very clearly stated in your original post that "[t]ickets for large events always go on sale on a Sunday afternoon." Not a suggestion or hint orrecommendation; you stated this as a fact. Where was that "should" until you flamed back at me? I don't recall you offering any criticisms ofthe "old" system either. Now that you agree with me that it was all very imperfect, how about telling us what you see as its shortcomings? I canonly guess you were having problems with your phrasing, and I may have been rolling my eyes too much to play editor here.

 

So you got good tickets a few times by standing in line. Fair play to you. But a majority of people don't, the odds are just against them. (Betterodds to shoot for production tickets at the box office, afternoon of the first show, etc. Forget the damned ticket outlets!) You're also refusing to dealwith the likelihood of someone mandating that all tickets go on sale on a set day/time (!), and the fact that (again) most stores/venues won't toleratelineups at all these days. So, sorry, but the idea that some changes would improve the old line-up-and-pray way to get tickets just doesn't strike me asbeing feasible.

 

Besides, the irony of it all: A super-hot ticket (U2) will sell out so fast these days--due mostly to the technological changes that I sketched out--that eventhe most legislated, regulated and tolerated line-up still won't give a fan a snowball's chance of getting anything other than a total bleeder in theback of the venue. The last two U2 tours, ticket didn't so much sell out as vaporize. The terminals choked up. Second shows were added minutes after the first show went on sale, and then the second show was called as "sold out" before even a single pair oftickets could be sold! Just as an example. Unless telephone and internet purchase of tickets get banned, buying a hot hot ticket in person is futile--nomatter what day, when, or how long you stand in line.

 

Speaking of irony, the "sidebar" remark was just that: A sidebar. In other words, not directed at you--itwas just an observation that came up while I was doing that technology/history/industry outline. Your personal pro/con over music DL's wasn't theissue (nor were any accusations made). Just the observation that while (too) many people have written endlessly about how technology has changed therecording biz, I see few well-reasoned articles on how technology has changed the live music scene. Like making in-person ticket sales obsolete! (And surelyyou've heard plenty of "music should be free" folks turn around and bitch about "TicketBastard" and online scalpers, etc.?)

 

Oh, and I'm not in my "fifties" yet--still waiting for that one. There'll be cake.

 

No, taking a swat at someone's superfan reveries isn't "childish," just practical. Hence the snark about work. Having come of age duringthe punk era, I've always taken a dim view of the "rock and roll lifestyle" that all but required fans carry on as if they never had to work aday in their life: Camp out for tickets! Stay out until the bars close! Consume many mind-altering substances, even if it's only Tuesday! Then mash inthe superfan ethos, where one has to constantly prove their fan-worship by doing stuff like...lining up for days toget in the front of the GA line, or lining up for days to get those GA tickets, and so on. Most of us are too poor and too practical to get suckered intoall that.

 

Oh, and you're the only one here who keeps referencing the 420... wink.gif

 

You want the best tickets to go to the die-hard fans, as do I--but who decides just who's "die-hard" enough to qualify? You seem to feel thatthis should be some sort of endurance test, sort of a "hands-on hard body" contest, like the stunts where people had to stand around a prize truckfor days, always keeping their hands on the truck, and the last contestant standing wins the truck. (Or when radio stations do stunts like, "What wouldyou do for U2 tickets?" and get fans to humiliate themselves on air--the folks who played "Sunday Bloody Sunday" on the accordian while naked deserve a mention here. ) But would endurance contests (or naked accordian playing) be the fairest way to judgewho's suitably die-hard?

 

As I said, U2 did have a very fair ticketing operation run by Propaganda.

 

Also, do U2 even really give a damn about their hardcore fans any more? Can't help but feel a twinge of pain when I hear other fans get misty about therare auld times, when the U2 of today (post-PopMart) is quite a different thing from the U2 I first came to know and love. Why suffer through some sort ofendurance contest for a band that looks more kindly on the thousands of other casual fans who fill the football stadiums?

 

-- eaplatt

Link to comment
Share on other sites

" I think most people would argue that they can't afford to be missing work to line up for tickets. The solution is simple. Tickets for large eventsalways go on sale on a Sunday afternoon. "

 

Do you get it now? Do you see how i never said that all tickets go on sale on Sunday but rather SHOULD go on sale on Sunday, if we used the old line up system.Internet communication is very one dimensional. You really have to pay attention to what somebody writes.

 

Addintionally i dont hear you offering any solutions to the current scalping/aftermarket ticket issues. While you may think modern tech is wonderful. Many ofus can see how it has changed things. How it has given scalpers/am ticket vendors MORE opportunities to get tickets into thier greedy hands and sell them to usfans for stupid prices.

 

I don't really give a hoot to be honest. I live in a relativily small market compared to most people. The stadium i will see them in is one of the largestin N america. Getting tix will not be problem for me personally and i don't have to buy some stupid pre sale code or any if the aftermarket b.s.

 

I find it sad that people who have bought piles of U2 merchandise over the years and supported thier tours are locked out in the fu#$%g cold nowadays. Becauselike you said they are at a different level of popularity since pop.

 

But it's all those pre-pop fans (like me) who got them where they are today.

 

We should be getting the choichest tickets. End of Discussion.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...