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dmway

R.I.P. Thread

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9 hours ago, Manohlive said:

Fly By Night was the first guitar riff I ever learned.  Rush was my band when I was a kid.  I saw them dozens of times. Led Zep was too inaccessible.  Rush was always touring.  It cost eight dollars to see them for the Hemisphere's tour.   The Spirit of Radio tour was ten bucks, I think. Nobody sounded like Rush. They are phenomenal musicians-each in is his own right.  Live, they were like looking up and seeing a freight train running me down. I survived and wanted to do it again as soon as the show ended..

Neil Peart's lyrics encompass a lot of different subjects.  They are very intelligent.  I respectfully disagree with dmway above. You won't know some of their best music if you only listen to their later work.  I never noticed Geddy Lee's voice being better or worse.  It just was. (no offense, dmway-I understand, and agree what you were saying about his voice.)   

Very early music:   I suggest Fly By Night, Bastille Days and Working Man

2112 is epic.  You cannot understand Rush without 2112.  (assuming you want to do so)   It's a very important album in the history of rock and roll.  The 2112 suite (first half of the album) taught me how dangerous power, in the wrong hands, can be..It scared me. It's about a govenment, in the future, which takes away music, for the greater good of all.  It's only 20 minutes long. I'd listen as a history lesson, but that's just me. It's science fiction in rock and roll.  There are parts where I start to get a bit overwhlemed, however,  it's very dynamic and quickly changes tempo. Give a listen to Discovery (around the 7 minute mark)  I love Alex Lifeson's guitar expressing how a human being might discover a guitar for the first time, not know what it is, pick it up and try to discern truth..The 18:15 minute mark-turn it up as loud as possible and hold onto your seat.  They were pretty much told they'd be ruined if they released 2112.  It was not true.  Rush is now third, behind The Beatles and The Stones, for the most consecutive gold or platinum albums released by a rock band.

A Farewell To Kings album: Xanadu and Closer to the Heart are not to be missed.  Xanadu is my favorite Rush track.  It's based on the Coleridge poem.  It introduced me to poetry.  The beginning of A Farewell to Kings sparked my desire to study classical guitar.  I heard that tonality and was hooked.

Hemispheres-listen to The Trees.  Rush wrote original morality tales and made them kick ass with rock and roll.  This is a great example. La Villa Strangiata birthed my love of flamenco music.  (long instrumental I would not suggest to a new listener)  Alex Lifeson is a very underrated guitarist. 

Permanent Waves-The Spirit of Radio is the obvious choice.  Jacob's Ladder is often overlooked.  It's one of my favoirtes.  This is the album where they start to play with pop, punk and other sounds.  As dmway said, this migh be the point where you start to like their music the most.  Much is still progressive but more contained.  All four of these albums were released between 1976 and 1980.   

Neil Peart is one of our best drummers  He is so good that I don't feel a right to say that.   He also wrote profound lyrics.  Fans still debate their meaning. . He was, and shall continue to be loved.  😭

              And the men who hold high places                                                                                                                                                                                                      Must be the ones to start                                                                                                                                                                                                                      To mold a new reality                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Closer to the heart                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Closer to the heart.

Oh, I think you are accidentally overstating our supposed differences of opinion about Rush. My personal preferences are much more in line with yours; I was just offering advice above based on those who are U2 fans first and may be encountering Rush for the first time.

My first musical love (in terms of genre) is progressive rock, from the late 60s through the entirety of the 70s. Genesis, Yes, King Crimson, ELP, Jethro Tull, Pink Floyd, Rush, Kansas, Styx - those bands made the music I loved, and still love, the most. The true impressiveness of U2 is displayed by the fact that, despite being inspired by the punk movement that was supposed to be overthrowing these progressive bands, I like our band from Dublin every bit as much as the bands from this movement. That's quite an accomplishment (however, they deserve the love - they are just that good).

I also personally prefer early Rush. "A Farewell To Kings" is my favorite Rush album - I love every song. "Permanent Waves" is a co-favorite. I suppose my favorite era of Rush crosses the decade boundary - "2112" to "Grace Under Pressure" is my personal 'definitive' Rush. The debut album (which lacked Neil's input) up to and including "Caress Of Steel" was larval-stage Rush, IMHO - I am buoyed by the fact that the band members themselves also regard their first fully proper Rush album as "2112". Before that album, I like many songs (e.g., "Fly By Night" "By-Tor and the Snow Dog", "Working Man", etc.), but I don't love any of the three albums from start to finish - they just didn't fully gel for an entire album until "2112". However, from that point on, they were simply one of the best bands in rock, especially live.

I also metaphorically chafe at those who prefer 70s Rush who are (somewhat or very) dismissive of their music after the 70s - their 80s and 90s music is truly excellent. It's just not classically progressive anymore; however, that doesn't mean that is isn't still outstanding - it is.

Anyway...

The fact that Neil had joined the great rock band in heaven is sad for us still on Earth. Like you, I was always rooting for one final reunion. I wish they had charged less for tickets on their 40th anniversary tour (I was still living in England at the time) - had I known that it was the last time I could see them, I would have gone for certain. I just thought they would be around longer, especially when "Clockwork Angels" was so good. Oh well...

R.I.P., Neil.

 

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39 minutes ago, dmway said:

our supposed differences

I know you love progressive msuic.  I read the next concerts thread.  I look forward to yours. I share your passion for the bands you listed above. .2112 through Grace Under Pressure is my favorite Rush era as well.  I said disagree as in listen to our favorites first. Which approach for a potential new convert to take when listening to such an awesome band: Poraytoe or tomahtoe? .  😁

There was a terrible snowstorm the day and night of the Hemispheres show. Milwaukee was at least an hour dirve south through hilly terrain.  I was a new driver and wasn't going to be able to go..  My parents drove my buddy and me down and back.  My dad worked in MIlwaukee.  He got no sleep because he had to do ths same trip through the snow for a third time in the morning. 

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On 1/10/2020 at 8:57 PM, Manohlive said:

image.png.f4be51a863e6b51b34645e6ad3b41205.png

....what he said....

 

listen to Rush sometime and allow yourself to mostly hear his drumming. If you know drumming a bit, you will not be infrequently simply blown away...and, find yourself, religiously saying, ' wow, nuts...(smile widely ), un f cking real "

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Rest in Peace Christopher Tolkien. And thank you from all of us Middle-Earth nerds for helping to bring us so many of your father's stories that would probably otherwise have stayed locked in an archive somewhere. 

Funnily enough, I have "The Fall of Gondolin" on loan from the library at the moment. I may well read that next now. 

https://www.theonering.net/torwp/2020/01/16/107518-christopher-tolkien-passes-away-at-the-age-of-95/ 

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8 hours ago, padawanbeck84 said:

Rest in Peace Christopher Tolkien. And thank you from all of us Middle-Earth nerds for helping to bring us so many of your father's stories that would probably otherwise have stayed locked in an archive somewhere. 

Funnily enough, I have "The Fall of Gondolin" on loan from the library at the moment. I may well read that next now. 

https://www.theonering.net/torwp/2020/01/16/107518-christopher-tolkien-passes-away-at-the-age-of-95/ 

Nooooo! :( Always been a casual Tolkien fan but I only got stuck into some of the posthumous releases within the past decade (The Silmarillion, Unfinished Tales and Morgoth's Ring). I'm so indescribably grateful for all of Christopher's hard work to share that extra material with us! What a sad day.

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On 1/16/2020 at 2:08 PM, padawanbeck84 said:

Rest in Peace Christopher Tolkien. And thank you from all of us Middle-Earth nerds for helping to bring us so many of your father's stories that would probably otherwise have stayed locked in an archive somewhere. 

Funnily enough, I have "The Fall of Gondolin" on loan from the library at the moment. I may well read that next now. 

https://www.theonering.net/torwp/2020/01/16/107518-christopher-tolkien-passes-away-at-the-age-of-95/ 

 

On 1/16/2020 at 10:12 PM, Canadanne said:

Nooooo! :( Always been a casual Tolkien fan but I only got stuck into some of the posthumous releases within the past decade (The Silmarillion, Unfinished Tales and Morgoth's Ring). I'm so indescribably grateful for all of Christopher's hard work to share that extra material with us! What a sad day.

I forgot to respond to this earlier in the week. Yes, thank goodness we had Christopher to continue his father's legacy. (As a side-note, Tolkien was one of my favorite films of 2019 - I'm glad that film was made; he deserved such a cinematic memoir.)

Tolkien's work is still interesting to read. I'm glad that Christopher found so much that had yet to see the light of day and brought it there. R.I.P., Christopher.

 

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R.I.P., Terry Jones.

He was one of the 5 main comedians of “Monty Python’s Flying Circus”. That show made me laugh more than anything in my youth - and still to this day. Terry was the one who directed their three feature films too (“Monty Python and the Holy Grail”, “The Life of Brian”, and “The Meaning of Life”).

The wonderful Monty Python boxset, which has every MP episode cleaned up as much as humanly possible (both the audio and the video, including the animations) was just released on BluRay this past November. Now, I can watch Terry and the rest of the troupe in pristine quality forever, the way they are meant to be seen and remembered.

R.I.P., Terry.

 

Edited by dmway

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Yes, very sad news about Terry Jones. But at least his work will live on and keep entertaining us for as long as footage and memories survive. 

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10 years ago, I hated Rush. I thought the lyrics to “Fly By Night” were cheesy, I thought Geddy was a girl and was not 1 iota more fond of him when I found out he was a guy (I called him “Geddy Spaghetti”), and I couldn’t stand their 8-minute songs. 
 

But I had to a lot of Rush songs often because my dad liked them and my brother loved them.

 

 I started to change my mind about Rush when I heard the song “Roll the Bones.” It was so catchy that I couldn’t resist it despite still disliking Geddy’s voice.

 

Over time, I found more songs that I liked, and I eventually even learned to like Geddy’s voice (I have to agree with @dmway that his voice improved when it mellowed and deepened just a touch in the 80s). 
 

Now I have a lot of fun singing along with Geddy to my favorite Rush songs, and Neil is one of my favorite songwriters. His sophisticated lyrics were one of the biggest reasons I changed my mind about Rush (I still don’t love “Fly By Night,” but it’s better than I originally gave it credit for).

 

The news of Neil’s death was devastating. I sadly never got to see Rush and realized that I probably never would, but it was still good to know that Neil Peart was living happily and peacefully in retirement for at least some time before his final illness.

 Thanks for your music and inspiration, Neil.

44DC74E7-202C-43A7-A959-15BAD2048B58.jpeg

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