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Why the disinterest all of a sudden?


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achtungbabyxx wrote:

depressing that people my age don't have the mental capacity to listen to good music

 

That's a grim outlook to have! :P Surely your peers listen to good music from young bands as well. How old are you, if I may ask?

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achtungbabyxx wrote:

well ok yeah, there's coldplay and the killers, they're good new bands that some kids (me included) listen to. it's just my experience that most kids my age only like top 40 radio. oh and i'm 17.

WaT u MeAn U dOnT lYkE tHe Jo BrOs?? roll.gif

I felt the same way in high school...it's the lament of the teenage U2 fans! But upon entering the real world, I realized there are people of all ages wholike all kinds of music. Someone mentioned that U2 has a huge 25-50 fanbase. But there are many, many fans that are younger than that (and plenty that areolder than that, I'm sure).

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achtungbabyxx wrote:

it's just my experience that most kids my age only like top 40 radio..

 

That makes sense. Since Top 40 radio is by definition what's most popular it makes sense most kids would like Top 40 radio. Besides, Top 40 is gearedtowards the young. It's the target audience. Coldplay and The Killers are in the Top 40 of course.

 

But you see, young people also listen to non-Top 40 stuff. Try to find them! It's fun. How about Bloc Party, Arcade Fire, Spoon, Dirty Projectors, AnimalCollective, Feist, Broken Social Scene, The New Pornographers, Japandroids, Phoenix, Bjork and more. There's a big space of indie music out there that isMOSTLY powered by young people.

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Soda wrote:

achtungbabyxx wrote:

it's just my experience that most kids my age only like top 40 radio..

 

That makes sense. Since Top 40 radio is by definition what's most popular it makes sense most kids would like Top 40 radio. Besides, Top 40 is geared towards the young. It's the target audience. Coldplay and The Killers are in the Top 40 of course.

 

But you see, young people also listen to non-Top 40 stuff. Try to find them! It's fun. How about Bloc Party, Arcade Fire, Spoon, Dirty Projectors, Animal Collective, Feist, Broken Social Scene, The New Pornographers, Japandroids, Phoenix, Bjork and more. There's a big space of indie music out there that is MOSTLY powered by young people.
ok i'll be sure to look into those. and i believe you that some young people like good music, but i live in one of those wealthy towns filledwith annoying preps who only like rap and britney spears, but i'm sure if i went to other parts of the country/met different people, i'd encountersomething different.
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achtungbabyxx wrote:

Soda wrote:

achtungbabyxx wrote:

it's just my experience that most kids my age only like top 40 radio..

 

That makes sense. Since Top 40 radio is by definition what's most popular it makes sense most kids would like Top 40 radio. Besides, Top 40 is geared towards the young. It's the target audience. Coldplay and The Killers are in the Top 40 of course.

 

But you see, young people also listen to non-Top 40 stuff. Try to find them! It's fun. How about Bloc Party, Arcade Fire, Spoon, Dirty Projectors, Animal Collective, Feist, Broken Social Scene, The New Pornographers, Japandroids, Phoenix, Bjork and more. There's a big space of indie music out there that is MOSTLY powered by young people.
ok i'll be sure to look into those. and i believe you that some young people like good music, but i live in one of those wealthy towns filled with annoying preps who only like rap and britney spears, but i'm sure if i went to other parts of the country/met different people, i'd encounter something different.

 

 

I hear ya. Don't let the bastards drag you down.

 

Music lovers are everywhere. I for one, feel this decade was fantastic. It was the decade the majors shrank and the indie bands soared. Arcade Fire, Neko Case,and Spoon had top 10 albums! And let's not forget Radiohead. So there was crappy pop and crappy rap. So what? There's always been crappy music. The keyis to find the good stuff and it's never been easier to do. Just takes a little time. And time is what young people have in spades.

 

Lately I've been listening to a lot of stuff on lala.com. You get to listen to anything in their library once for free. It's a great way to sample newmusic. Entire albums in fact. If you like it and want to listen again you buy it. If not, you move on.

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Manohlive wrote:
Gary Sabo wrote:
a few things i'm thinking...

1, if you remember the ATYCLB sales were really good cause people was expecting an album like that... after what happened with POP (in my opinion a GREAT album) and the album had a very good first single Beautiful Day

2, HTDAAB (in my opinion a better album than ATYCLB) had a great first single Vertigo (commercially speaking) it was played everywhere and i do mean EVERYWHERE smokin.gif

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I agree that radio stations likely wouldn't stop playing songs by certain artists, even if they weren't pleased about the artists wanting royalties.

 

I remember listening to an interview with a station's music director once, and he said that he's played songs that he doesn't particularly care forsimply because of the volume of requests that the station received for them.

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Here is an interesting little editorial from a little paper in Florida--home of theUniversity of Florida--regarding alleged strong-arming by the recordcompanies.

 

Danger Mouse keeps silent on CD, Bono banned from radio

By Bill Dean

Gainesville Sun entertainment editor

 

Published: Thursday, June 18, 2009 at 6:01 a.m.

 

The financial system has slid down the slush-tubes of septic-tank insecurity and General Motors is in the doghouse of bankruptcy. So ... how's the ol'record industry doing?

 

If you were concocting a Kafka-esque compendium of crazy scenarios that illustrate just how bad things have gotten, you might not imagine that it would come tothe point that CDs could be released without music, or that an artist the stature of Bono could be banned from radio. But those are just among the latest ofreports and allegations swirling around the world of big-time (and big-lawsuit) music.

 

Danger Mouse's latest CD, "Dark Night of the Soul," has a companion video by David Lynch on YouTube and an album set to be released with a bookof 50 photographs by the famous director. All's fine except for one little detail: The CD will be blank, with an accompanying sticker that says "Forlegal reasons, enclosed CD-R contains no music. Use it as you will," The New York Times reported last week.

 

On Danger Mouse's Web site, www.dnots.com, an explanation says: "Due to an ongoing dispute with EMI, Danger Mouse is unable to release the recordedmusic for 'Dark Night of the Soul' without fear of being sued by EMI."

 

It's bad enough that the major labels have steam rolled iTunes into raising the price of top-tier songs, and that they continue to fiddle over theirbloated take of the pie as the Rome-like state of music burns. But now one of them has gone the extra step of trying to strangle the goose that lays the goldenegg - in this case, stifling what's sure to be a best-selling platter by a musician who's one-half of the incredibly popular (and successful) duo,Gnarls Barkley. How's that for doing everything you can to raise your company's bottom line when the record business has all but bottomed out?

 

But wait, it's even worse than we thought: Because of efforts by musicians to ask for compensation when their songs are played on the radio, some of themare finding their music essentially black-listed by certain radio stations. Chief among them appear to be U2, according to the Associated Press, which obtaineda complaint filed with the Federal Communications Commission.

 

U2 singer Bono has gone on the record through musicFIRST, a group advocating that musicians be compensated for the airplay of their music, asking that theyreceive royalties in a similar way that songwriters do now. Because of their outspokeness on the topic, certain artists have been dropped from playlists oncertain stations, the AP reported.

 

The issue of paying musicians for airplay rights is a topic that's at least worthy of discussion and debate in a free country. And though it's easy tosee which side radio conglomerates might fall on the matter, it's asinine and idiotic for them to resort to defacto extortion to get their point across. Iftit demands tat to break the impasse, perhaps U2 and other artists in the same position should withhold airplay permission for all of their music as well.

 

You'd think that corporate radio might remember the times we're in before considering such strong-arming - and before engaging in tactics likely toblow up on their own bean-counting bottom line.

 

As Bono says in a statement on musicfirstcoalition.org, "The music business is in a state of freefall." That's absolutely, you-know-what right,to paraphrase Martin Sheen's incredulous character in "Apocalypse Now." Maybe we need to set up screenings for radio and record-companyexecutives.

 

 

http://www.gainesville.com/article/20090618/COLUMNISTS/906181035/1026/ENTERTAINMENT?Title=Danger-Mouse-keeps-silent-on-CD-Bono-banned-from-radio

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