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    And they are finished their groundbreaking workshops on De-Institutionalisation! 3 days, 6 workshops, over 200 participants and one very happy team...Thanks to everyone who attended. Here's to the future!
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    Enter this fantastic raffle to be in with a chance of winning some incredible prizes! All proceeds go to our Dublin Outreach Group to help these cuties.🎄🎁🎅 It's CHRISTMAS! 🎅🎁🎄
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    THANK🍴FULL for you! Tag someone you're thankful for today & everyday. #Thanksgiving
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    🚨Every 18 seconds, one person is diagnosed with HIV. But, we can change that. Join us & Durex and let’s #endAIDS! #HaveSexSaveLives
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    Feast & fight AIDS. 🍗🥧 #SHOPATHON Amazon.com/RED
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    Inside Development Gender equality Campaigns are not enough to end violence against women, UN experts say By Amy Lieberman // 26 November 2019 Democracy, Human Rights & Governance Social/Inclusive Development UN Women A scene from the UN Women-hosted commemoration of International Day for Elimination of Violence Against Women. Photo by: Evan Schneider / U.N. UNITED NATIONS — A flood of #orangetheworld social media posts — as well as orange-clad visitors to the United Nations — commemorated International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women on Monday, which aims to spread awareness about gender-based violence. But what’s actually needed is investment in gender inequality, which is the root cause of violence against women and girls, according to Kalliopi Mingeirou, head of the Ending Violence Against Women Section of UN Women. “We know evidence shows that campaigns are not enough and do not change the mentalities of people. They really do not work on their own. Now we know we have increasing evidence that violence against women is preventable, and we have some strategies that can work,” Mingeirou said in an interview with Devex. “Violence against women and girls happens in a continuum. It is part of the same violence that women and girls face in their everyday lives.” — Kalliopi Mingeirou, chief of Ending Violence Against Women Section, UN Women There is a need to increase work and funding related to prevention, Mingeirou said. Approximately 35% of women worldwide have experienced physical or sexual violence at some point in their lives, but some national studies also show that up to 70% of women have experienced physical or sexual violence from an intimate partner, according to U.N. Women. Mingeirou wants to see longer-term support for gender-based violence survivors, like housing and employment opportunities. U.N. Secretary-General António Guterres has supported a survivor-focused response to sexual violence, in part through a 3-year-old trust fund. So far, it has generated about $2 million and is operating in three countries. Another entity, the UN Trust Fund to End Violence Against Women, has a portfolio of about $50 million. But more could be done to direct support to women-led civil-society organizations that address gender inequality and policy at the country level, Mingeirou said. More reading: ► Opinion: Reaffirming our promise to end violence against women ► The woman who put gender-based violence data on the map “There is a lot of attention and awareness. We have commitments, but they do not always have adequate resources to be materialized,” she said. The UN Women-hosted commemoration on Monday focused on sexual violence in conflict — or what U.N. Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict Pramila Patten called “history’s greatest silence.” Ajna Jusić, president of the Forgotten Children of War Association, spoke Monday of her experiences as a child born of rape during the conflict in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Twenty-six years later, Jusić and her mother are still living with stigma, Jusić said. Her organization is advocating for measures to recognize children born of war as a vulnerable group with social protection services. Get development's most important headlines in your inbox every day. Subscribe “Immediately after the war, people and survivors were left alone without any support. A dark cloud of trauma came over our country … There was no systematic move from the state to respond. All the shame was left on the women survivors,” Jusić said. There’s a “big issue” with national laws on domestic and sexual violence, according to Mingeirou. Nearly 1 in 4 countries do not have laws on domestic violence, and only 41% of countries explicitly criminalize marital rape, Mingeirou explained. Enforcement remains a challenge. 607 people are talking about this Via Twitter. “We still have some gaps in the area of laws, for sure, but the most important gap right now is the enforcement of such legislation,” Mingeirou said. During her address at the U.N., Patten highlighted some areas of progress in addressing and preventing sexual violence in conflict, but also many of the lingering challenges, including those faced by U.N. peacekeeping forces. “Peacekeepers are now systematically trained to detect, to deter, sexual violence as part of their operational readiness standards. Sexual violence has become an integral part of criminal investigations,” Patten said. In November, judges at the International Criminal Court gave former Congolese rebel leader Bosco Ntaganda a historic 30-year sentence on 18 counts of war crimes, including rape and sexual slavery, Patten noted. But U.N. peacekeeping also remains a “male-dominated domain,” according to Patten, with marginal representation of women in police and military units. And sexual violence in conflict remains a tactic used by state and nonstate armed groups, such as the Islamic State group. “The international community has not yet adequately invested in the structural, root causes that perpetuate this violence, such as inequality. Women and girls are a critical agency for conflict prevention and peace building. Yet when former negotiations and transitional justice processes begin, they are too often marginalized and pushed out of the picture,” Patten said. Mingeirou emphasized the need to link sexual violence in conflict to the “same phenomenon that women face at community and in their homes.” “Violence against women and girls happens in a continuum. It is part of the same violence that women and girls face in their everyday lives,” she said. “We need to recognize that and work to prevent it.” About the author Amy Liebermanamylieberman Amy Lieberman is the New York Correspondent for Devex. She covers the United Nations and reports on global development and politics. Amy previously worked as a freelance reporter, covering the environment, human rights, immigration, and health across the U.S. and in more than 10 countries, including Colombia, Mexico, Nepal, and Cambodia. Her coverage has appeared in the Guardian, the Atlantic, Slate, and the Los Angeles Times. A native New Yorker, Amy received her master’s degree in politics and government from Columbia’s School of Journalism.
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    Our volunteers make us proud every day. 🙌🏼
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    0 MEMBERS IN ACTION Here’s how ONE activists helped the Global Fund break records 11 October 2019 4:27PM UTC | By: ONE JOIN Join the fight against extreme poverty EmailJoin Share on Facebook Save on Facebook Share on Twitter Share by Email The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria has secured US$14 billion in pledges for its life-saving work over the next three years — the largest replenishment of a multilateral health organisation in history. We’ve been campaigning in support of the Global Fund over the past year to make sure world leaders were committed to stepping up the fight ahead of the 2019 replenishment in Lyon. And thanks to these efforts, every market where we campaigned reached — or exceeded — their target pledges. Like every ONE campaign, we rely on our staff, volunteers and members, and every win we achieve is the result of a team effort among our activists. Here’s a look at our global efforts over the past year to secure US$14 billion to tackle three of the world’s deadliest diseases. France In replenishment host country France, our activists worked hard right up to the moment the US$14 billion was announced. Starting over the summer, our Youth Ambassadors raised awareness at five summer festivals, urging festival-goers to take our quiz to raise awareness for the three diseases, sign the petition, and write postcards to French President Emmanuel Macron. In the lead up to the replenishment in Lyon, French Youth Ambassadors attended three events in different French cities, where other NGOs also made their voices heard with a clear objective: gather as many petition signatures as possible. French Youth Ambassadors and ONE Champions from Nigeria and Mali took their voices to the streets of Lyon ahead of the replenishment conference. They visited (RED) street murals, and met (RED) ambassador and activist Connie Mudenda, who shared her inspiring fight against AIDS and her story of how she raised her healthy daughter, with needed treatments, thanks to the Global Fund. Our activists gathered dozens people to form a giant human red ribbon, and they ran a booth with our superhero quiz in the Palais des Congrès, the location of the replenishment. The day before the replenishment, they attended a dinner where big companies were encouraged to increase their pledges for the Global Fund. And they led discussions with our co-founder Bono, philanthropist Bill Gates and President Macron to ask them to be ambitious in the fight against these three deadly diseases. Youth Ambassadors made their voices heard until the last minute in Lyon, handing in our global petition to the French Minister of Health Agnès Buzyn. And they were there to celebrate when our goal of raising US$14 billion was realised. — Anaïs Martinon, France Campaigns Coordinator Canada We kicked off campaigning earlier this year with postcards to Minister Maryam Monsef. Our members stepped up and sent THOUSANDS of postcards — followed with hundreds of emails to the minister, over 1,000 Canada Day emails to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, hundreds of tweets and dozens of letters to their local newspaper. We worked closely with Loyce Maturu from the Global Fund Advocates Network, whose op-ed in The Globe and Mail turned up the heat. ONE members in London, Abuja and Dakar all visited Canadian embassies to encourage Canada to step up the fight. The campaign reached a high point at Pride Montréal, where we worked with HIV/AIDS organizations from Québec to share the message that any investment less than CA$925 million was not enough. ONE volunteers from Montréal took advantage of Prime Minister Trudeau attending the parade to share thousands of rainbow-coloured stickers with a clear message that Canada can help end AIDS by 2030. Finally, after eight months of constant pressure, and less than a week after our activities in Montréal, Minister Monsef announced CA$930 million during an event in Toronto. In response, our members thanked Prime Minister Trudeau and Minister Monsef, and we continued the celebration at the pride parade in Ottawa. — Paul Galipeau, Canada Campaigns Manager Ireland Ireland delivered an early pledge, before our global campaign officially kicked off, and ONE Youth Ambassadors were quick to congratulate the government on Twitter. After hearing the good news, we reached out to our members and Youth Ambassadors to gather messages for a thank you card that was hand delivered to the government representative and Minister for Youth Affairs Katherine Zappone at the Youth Ambassador launch in Dublin. — Jasmine Wakeel, U.K. Campaigns Coordinator Africa Our campaign to support the Global Fund replenishment kick-started with the World Health Assembly in Geneva. We sent letters to the African health ministers chairing the Africa group to encourage them to discuss the global fund and make a statement of support to the replenishment. Following Nelson Mandela Day, we reached out to ONE members in Africa who had signed our petition and asked them to share the petition across Facebook, Twitter and WhatsApp. Our supporters across Africa tweeted at their respective health ministers, calling on them to make bold commitments to the Global Fund. Ahead of the African Union health ministers meeting, we lobbied the AU intensively to include the Global Fund replenishment on the agenda and mobilised our Africa members to take action by again tweeting at their health ministers, highlighting just how serious they were about their governments making formal commitments to the Global Fund replenishment. As a result, the ministers adopted a decision which urged Member States and partners to honour the commitments for the replenishment of the Global Fund in accordance with the AU Assembly Declaration of February 2019. — Edwin Ikhuoria, Africa Executive Director (interim) United Kingdom Following dedicated months of campaigning, we were delighted to receive a bold pledge from the U.K. government that will help save up to 2 million lives. We had so many exciting campaign activities from kick off until the pledge announcement, including handing our petition to No.10 Downing Street, a health heroes event in the House of Commons, lobby days in Parliament and community action. We even had support from a famous face: actor and advocate Michael Sheen helped us get even more crucial MP supporters on board with our Global Fund campaigning. — Jasmine Wakeel, U.K. Campaigns Coordinator Germany In the run-up to the G7 Summit in France, where Germany’s Global Fund pledge was officially announced, we started a petition to convince German politicians to engage in the fight against AIDS. To back up this action, our supporters wrote letters to German Minister for Development Gerd Müller. Our amazing Youth Ambassadors even went to his constituency to deliver the letter personally and to talk to locals about the action. Our Youth Ambassador Janice met Mr. Müller to hand over the petition and discuss the importance of the Global Fund. After hearing the good news about Germany’s commitment to the Global Fund, we are sending thank you messages to Prime Minister Angela Merkel, who made the announcement in Biarritz. — ONE’s team in Germany United States U.S. volunteers spent the past year campaigning to secure a strong pledge to meet the United States’ historic one-third commitment to the Global Fund. Volunteers started by gathering 4,800 postcards to Secretary of State Mike Pompeo last fall to try to influence the Trump administration’s budget request. Then in February, volunteers traveled to Capitol Hill for more than 200 meetings with Congress, urging them to step up the fight. U.S. volunteers spent the rest of 2019 rallying their communities — everywhere from small gatherings in coffee shops and churches, to huge music festivals like Bonnaroo and Lollapalooza. They got creative with (RED), taking action with a Truff hot sauce challenge twist, got mindful and limber with some Yoga activism at Wanderlust festivals, and helped paint the world (RED) through street art to draw attention to the fight against AIDS. U.S. volunteers even became human billboards in support of the Global Fund at the Congressional Softball and Baseball games in Washington, DC. After tens of thousands of advocacy actions — including handwritten letters, tweets, emails, media published in local papers, and local engagements with congressional members — we saw over half of the U.S. Congress (285 representatives and senators) go on the record publicly in support of the Global Fund, sending a strong signal to the rest of the world ahead of the replenishment conference in Lyon. — Charlie Harris, Associate Director, Membership Mobilization Italy Despite a government crisis in Italy, our Italian Youth Ambassadors and members continued the fight to secure a pledge for the Global Fund. We mass-tweeted at Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte while he was on his way to the G7 Summit with a simple message: Italy’s leadership in the fight against three of the deadliest diseases is key. And those efforts were crucial to securing a pledge from Italy. Prime Minister Conte received hundreds of emails and tweets, Youth Ambassadors delivered 400+ handwritten postcards to the international development minister, and there were over 100 media mentions of the Youth Ambassadors’ awareness-raising activities in their communities. — Caterina Scuderi, Italy Campaigns Coordinator EU We also worked hard to make sure the European Union was committed to the Global Fund. Félicitas, a medical student and German Youth Ambassador in Belgium, wrote a letter to European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker, with other YAs in Europe also co-signing the letter. Félicitas attended the Friends of Global Fund Meeting and pushed European Commissioner for Development Neven Mimica to make an early commitment to the fund. Youth Ambassadors then took to Twitter to ask Juncker to take Felicita’s letter into account, and our members urged Juncker to act against AIDS. To put some final pressure during the summer, our YAs sent handwritten postcards to Mr. Juncker and EU Council President Donald Tusk about the importance of investing €580 million to the Global Fund. During the G7 Summit, they also dressed up as superheroes and sent several tweets and messages urging them to make concrete commitments. — Guadalupe de la Casas, Media Manager A Global Success The new funding will help to save 16 million lives and move forward the fight to end the AIDS, TB and malaria epidemics by 2030. This record-breaking replenishment saw the biggest ever investment from private sector donors and renewed pledges from the U.S., U.K., Canada, Germany, the EU and Italy — which all increased their commitment by over 15% — and from France, which increased its contribution by more than 20%. Want to take part in our campaigns fighting to change the world? Join us and become a ONE Member now.
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    We can (and WILL) have a good world if we all work together. ❤️
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    Pray for PEACE in our world, especially the Middle East.
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    0 MEMBERS IN ACTION Here’s how ONE activists helped the Global Fund break records 11 October 2019 4:27PM UTC | By: ONE JOIN Join the fight against extreme poverty EmailJoin Share on Facebook Save on Facebook Share on Twitter Share by Email The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria has secured US$14 billion in pledges for its life-saving work over the next three years — the largest replenishment of a multilateral health organisation in history. We’ve been campaigning in support of the Global Fund over the past year to make sure world leaders were committed to stepping up the fight ahead of the 2019 replenishment in Lyon. And thanks to these efforts, every market where we campaigned reached — or exceeded — their target pledges. Like every ONE campaign, we rely on our staff, volunteers and members, and every win we achieve is the result of a team effort among our activists. Here’s a look at our global efforts over the past year to secure US$14 billion to tackle three of the world’s deadliest diseases. France In replenishment host country France, our activists worked hard right up to the moment the US$14 billion was announced. Starting over the summer, our Youth Ambassadors raised awareness at five summer festivals, urging festival-goers to take our quiz to raise awareness for the three diseases, sign the petition, and write postcards to French President Emmanuel Macron. In the lead up to the replenishment in Lyon, French Youth Ambassadors attended three events in different French cities, where other NGOs also made their voices heard with a clear objective: gather as many petition signatures as possible. French Youth Ambassadors and ONE Champions from Nigeria and Mali took their voices to the streets of Lyon ahead of the replenishment conference. They visited (RED) street murals, and met (RED) ambassador and activist Connie Mudenda, who shared her inspiring fight against AIDS and her story of how she raised her healthy daughter, with needed treatments, thanks to the Global Fund. Our activists gathered dozens people to form a giant human red ribbon, and they ran a booth with our superhero quiz in the Palais des Congrès, the location of the replenishment. The day before the replenishment, they attended a dinner where big companies were encouraged to increase their pledges for the Global Fund. And they led discussions with our co-founder Bono, philanthropist Bill Gates and President Macron to ask them to be ambitious in the fight against these three deadly diseases. Youth Ambassadors made their voices heard until the last minute in Lyon, handing in our global petition to the French Minister of Health Agnès Buzyn. And they were there to celebrate when our goal of raising US$14 billion was realised. — Anaïs Martinon, France Campaigns Coordinator Canada We kicked off campaigning earlier this year with postcards to Minister Maryam Monsef. Our members stepped up and sent THOUSANDS of postcards — followed with hundreds of emails to the minister, over 1,000 Canada Day emails to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, hundreds of tweets and dozens of letters to their local newspaper. We worked closely with Loyce Maturu from the Global Fund Advocates Network, whose op-ed in The Globe and Mail turned up the heat. ONE members in London, Abuja and Dakar all visited Canadian embassies to encourage Canada to step up the fight. The campaign reached a high point at Pride Montréal, where we worked with HIV/AIDS organizations from Québec to share the message that any investment less than CA$925 million was not enough. ONE volunteers from Montréal took advantage of Prime Minister Trudeau attending the parade to share thousands of rainbow-coloured stickers with a clear message that Canada can help end AIDS by 2030. Finally, after eight months of constant pressure, and less than a week after our activities in Montréal, Minister Monsef announced CA$930 million during an event in Toronto. In response, our members thanked Prime Minister Trudeau and Minister Monsef, and we continued the celebration at the pride parade in Ottawa. — Paul Galipeau, Canada Campaigns Manager Ireland Ireland delivered an early pledge, before our global campaign officially kicked off, and ONE Youth Ambassadors were quick to congratulate the government on Twitter. After hearing the good news, we reached out to our members and Youth Ambassadors to gather messages for a thank you card that was hand delivered to the government representative and Minister for Youth Affairs Katherine Zappone at the Youth Ambassador launch in Dublin. — Jasmine Wakeel, U.K. Campaigns Coordinator Africa Our campaign to support the Global Fund replenishment kick-started with the World Health Assembly in Geneva. We sent letters to the African health ministers chairing the Africa group to encourage them to discuss the global fund and make a statement of support to the replenishment. Following Nelson Mandela Day, we reached out to ONE members in Africa who had signed our petition and asked them to share the petition across Facebook, Twitter and WhatsApp. Our supporters across Africa tweeted at their respective health ministers, calling on them to make bold commitments to the Global Fund. Ahead of the African Union health ministers meeting, we lobbied the AU intensively to include the Global Fund replenishment on the agenda and mobilised our Africa members to take action by again tweeting at their health ministers, highlighting just how serious they were about their governments making formal commitments to the Global Fund replenishment. As a result, the ministers adopted a decision which urged Member States and partners to honour the commitments for the replenishment of the Global Fund in accordance with the AU Assembly Declaration of February 2019. — Edwin Ikhuoria, Africa Executive Director (interim) United Kingdom Following dedicated months of campaigning, we were delighted to receive a bold pledge from the U.K. government that will help save up to 2 million lives. We had so many exciting campaign activities from kick off until the pledge announcement, including handing our petition to No.10 Downing Street, a health heroes event in the House of Commons, lobby days in Parliament and community action. We even had support from a famous face: actor and advocate Michael Sheen helped us get even more crucial MP supporters on board with our Global Fund campaigning. — Jasmine Wakeel, U.K. Campaigns Coordinator Germany In the run-up to the G7 Summit in France, where Germany’s Global Fund pledge was officially announced, we started a petition to convince German politicians to engage in the fight against AIDS. To back up this action, our supporters wrote letters to German Minister for Development Gerd Müller. Our amazing Youth Ambassadors even went to his constituency to deliver the letter personally and to talk to locals about the action. Our Youth Ambassador Janice met Mr. Müller to hand over the petition and discuss the importance of the Global Fund. After hearing the good news about Germany’s commitment to the Global Fund, we are sending thank you messages to Prime Minister Angela Merkel, who made the announcement in Biarritz. — ONE’s team in Germany United States U.S. volunteers spent the past year campaigning to secure a strong pledge to meet the United States’ historic one-third commitment to the Global Fund. Volunteers started by gathering 4,800 postcards to Secretary of State Mike Pompeo last fall to try to influence the Trump administration’s budget request. Then in February, volunteers traveled to Capitol Hill for more than 200 meetings with Congress, urging them to step up the fight. U.S. volunteers spent the rest of 2019 rallying their communities — everywhere from small gatherings in coffee shops and churches, to huge music festivals like Bonnaroo and Lollapalooza. They got creative with (RED), taking action with a Truff hot sauce challenge twist, got mindful and limber with some Yoga activism at Wanderlust festivals, and helped paint the world (RED) through street art to draw attention to the fight against AIDS. U.S. volunteers even became human billboards in support of the Global Fund at the Congressional Softball and Baseball games in Washington, DC. After tens of thousands of advocacy actions — including handwritten letters, tweets, emails, media published in local papers, and local engagements with congressional members — we saw over half of the U.S. Congress (285 representatives and senators) go on the record publicly in support of the Global Fund, sending a strong signal to the rest of the world ahead of the replenishment conference in Lyon. — Charlie Harris, Associate Director, Membership Mobilization Italy Despite a government crisis in Italy, our Italian Youth Ambassadors and members continued the fight to secure a pledge for the Global Fund. We mass-tweeted at Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte while he was on his way to the G7 Summit with a simple message: Italy’s leadership in the fight against three of the deadliest diseases is key. And those efforts were crucial to securing a pledge from Italy. Prime Minister Conte received hundreds of emails and tweets, Youth Ambassadors delivered 400+ handwritten postcards to the international development minister, and there were over 100 media mentions of the Youth Ambassadors’ awareness-raising activities in their communities. — Caterina Scuderi, Italy Campaigns Coordinator EU We also worked hard to make sure the European Union was committed to the Global Fund. Félicitas, a medical student and German Youth Ambassador in Belgium, wrote a letter to European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker, with other YAs in Europe also co-signing the letter. Félicitas attended the Friends of Global Fund Meeting and pushed European Commissioner for Development Neven Mimica to make an early commitment to the fund. Youth Ambassadors then took to Twitter to ask Juncker to take Felicita’s letter into account, and our members urged Juncker to act against AIDS. To put some final pressure during the summer, our YAs sent handwritten postcards to Mr. Juncker and EU Council President Donald Tusk about the importance of investing €580 million to the Global Fund. During the G7 Summit, they also dressed up as superheroes and sent several tweets and messages urging them to make concrete commitments. — Guadalupe de la Casas, Media Manager A Global Success The new funding will help to save 16 million lives and move forward the fight to end the AIDS, TB and malaria epidemics by 2030. This record-breaking replenishment saw the biggest ever investment from private sector donors and renewed pledges from the U.S., U.K., Canada, Germany, the EU and Italy — which all increased their commitment by over 15% — and from France, which increased its contribution by more than 20%. Want to take part in our campaigns fighting to change the world? Join us and become a ONE Member now.
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    GIRLS & WOMEN This Nigerian Woman Transforms Tires Into Cool Recycled Furniture The popular entrepreneur is inspiring a new career path for women in her country. Why Global Citizens Should Care Incinerating tires can negatively impact the environment through polluted air, water, and soil. Finding creative uses for giving old rubber tires a second life is an important conservation effort. You can join us in taking action on this issue and the rest of the Global Goals here. A female entrepreneur is turning discarded rubber tires into thoughtful home decor. Olabanke Banjo, founder and CEO of Cyrus45 Factory, recycles and transforms used tires into interior design — setting a new example for many women in her community in Nigeria, reports the BBC. Take Action: Call on Governments and Business Leaders to Say No to Single-Use Plastics Brought to you by: UN Convention to Combat Desertification Tweet Now: Show Your Support for a Great Green Wall Across Africa! PASA A LA ACCIÓN Más información "When women see what I do they are inspired to do something similar,” Banjo told the BBC in an interview — “go into carpentry … or something that’s seen as a male-dominated field.” To those who might have the desire but lack the courage, Banjo implores them to search for inner strength. “Do not let fear of striking out keep you from exploring your talents and creativity,” she said, according to an earlier report in the Guardian. “I once read a woman should be two things: who and what she wants to be.” A former writer and digital strategist, Banjo graduated from the Obafemi Awolowo University in Ile-Ife Osun State. Read More: Indian Fishermen Are Using Ocean Trash to Build New Roads But having expressed an interest in literature and fine arts from an early age, it wasn’t entirely surprising when Banjo quit her job in May to pursue a new entrepreneurial venture that combined her sense of creativity with an affinity for the environment. “I have always been art inclined,” Banjo told The African Woman (TAW). I recall starting a jewelry and greeting cards-making business in my 200 level at the university. I also learnt how to make handbags during my NYSC. Art has always been an innate part of me, and it’s one of my first true loves.” The idea for Cyrus45 emerged organically while spending time with family, according to the report. “It all started last year while I was living with my elder sister in Lagos,” Banjo told TAW. “She had about a pile of 20 used tires in her compound, which her neighbours wanted to dispose. But being a lover of revamping old items, I asked them to give the tires to me instead and the rest is what you see today.” Read More: This UK Store Will Buy Back Old Clothes to Cut Down on Waste Banjo now upcycles tires sourced from refuse centers, incinerators, and individuals looking to replace the ones on their vehicle, as well as those found on the side of the road. From there, the entrepreneur creates “artsy and ultra-modern” pieces of furniture, including chairs, rockers, and ottomans that happen to be sustainable and earth-friendly. “If I don’t do something for my environment, who will?” said Banjo in the interview with the BBC. “With recycling and upcycling, the possibilities are endless.” TOPICSEnvironmentGender EqualityWomen & GirlsSustainabilityInnovationGirls & WomenNigeriaSocial Entrepreneurship COMMENTS
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    It was a problem on all of their recent tours. A small group commandeers the front of the line, sets up their own lists and check-ins and pushes out the locals. Their feeling is that they follow the band, so they are entitled to the front row. It breeds resentment among those who cannot spend the time or money traveling around following U2 and only go to see them when they visit their hometown (I live in NYC, so they are here on every tour - I've seen them multiple times in the last 5 years without having to go more than about 30 miles from home). When you are seeing them in your hometown, your regular life (jobs, school, family) gets in the way of random hour check-ins and/or sitting in line for days. I've said it before, I'll say it again. They need to put in the system that Springsteen uses. Depending on the size of the venue and the GA, X amount of numbered bracelets are distributed X hours before a show starts. A public lottery is held to determine which number becomes the front of the line and everyone falls in behind that person. The more often you go, the better your odds of being in the first group at least once on a tour. The locals have just as much chance of being in front as the tour followers. Done.
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