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Life Stands Still On New Orleans' Honeysuckle Lane

Listen Now [8 min 59 sec]
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John Brown, a retiree and avid golfer, is back in his duplex on Honeysuckle Lane. Two years ago, he said he wasn't coming back, but he changed his mind,and now he's "stayin' for good."

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Brown says that although he has rehabbed his side (right) of the duplex, his neighbor hasn't done anything. But Brown, who is a prostate cancer survivor,is more concerned about not having a hospital nearby.

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Ernie Vincent, a singer-songwriter, says people are not going to come back to the area around Honeysuckle if there aren't services, a hospital and stores.

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Jeane Wooten, who teaches at a charter school around the corner from Honeysuckle Lane, asks why the recovery is taking so long. "What's stopping theprogress?" she says.

All Things Considered, March 23, 2009 · After Hurricane Katrina raked New Orleans in 2005 and scattered its people, NPR began following the plight of those onHoneysuckle Lane. A 20-minute drive from the city center, it's a perfectly average place, with middle-income residents such as cops and school teachersliving in midsized homes.

The punishment Katrina inflicted on Honeysuckle Lane was average by comparison: some roof damage, mostly standing water. But the storm turned Honeysuckleinto something like a ghost town.

While most of the houses had a foot or less of floodwater, mold had claimed the drywall and the furniture. Every refrigerator was a coffin full of rottenfood and had to be replaced. The smells inside the homes were oppressive. Scavengers drove through and took what they pleased. When the water was turned backon, washing machines and dishwashers that had been dislodged in the flooding started spewing water.

A lot has changed since then.

'It's On Now, I'm Stayin' For Good'

NPR's Robert Siegel recently returned to Honeysuckle Lane - located in a part of the city called New Orleans East, which was undeveloped wetland untilthe '60s - to catch up with some of the people who live there, people like Gaye Hewitt.

"We started rebuilding, we started getting some of the house back together; at least we're back in the house, we're no longer in atrailer," says Hewitt, a former police officer who was doing medical transcription a few years ago. "Then [Hurricane] Gustav came, and we had tostart again. We're almost hopefully done with everything before the next storm comes. I hope that takes a while. I think we'll be ready for the nextone.

"We still have some damage with the fireplace and everything," she says. "But everything's pretty good. We got us another dog. We lostour first dog in Katrina, so we have another one. The kids are back in school, back in college. I have one son who's now in the police department - and inaddition, a 2-year-old granddaughter."

Outside the house, Hewitt pointed to the damage from Gustav. She says the storm tore the top off her shed.

"I'm hoping that they'll have someone who will come fix it up, because it's been a haven for animals and anyone else that's looking forshelter," she says.

Down the street, John Brown, a retiree and avid golfer, is back in his duplex. Two years ago, he said he wasn't coming back, but he changed hismind.

"House comin' along pretty good," he says, adding, "It's on now, I'm stayin' for good."

Sitting in front of Brown's fireplace is a Tiger Woods model golf bag that he won. And he lowered a ceiling to create a room upstairs for histrophies.

Nowadays, the homes on Honeysuckle are furnished with the brand new stuff everyone bought with the insurance money: stainless steel refrigerators, flatscreen TVs, newly installed cabinets and refinished breakfast bars. It's the type of stuff that people in New Orleans call "Katrinkets."

The duplex that's attached to Brown's home is a different story - his neighbor hasn't done anything with the space.

But Brown has a larger problem. He was diagnosed with prostate cancer several years ago, and although he's doing well, Methodist Hospital never reopenedafter the storm.

"One problem was when I had my prostate problem, I had a little setback. I had to go all the way to Houston, Texas, after I had my procedure,"Brown says. "The emergency room wait was eight or nine hours. There's just no hospital in the east part of New Orleans for sure."

Lack Of Hospitals, Stores

The lack of a hospital in New Orleans East was the biggest problem the people on Honeysuckle talked about. That and the lack of stores. The Wal-Mart isgone, and there's only one supermarket open.

Lionel Bazanac, a telephone company installer who lives across the street from Brown, says the area is "not quite back yet."

"Friends moved away, never come back," Bazanac says. "Schools never opened up again. So we're still waiting for that normalcy to comeback, but we don't know if we'll ever get it."

Honeysuckle Lane resident Ernest Vincent Williams, a singer-songwriter who performs and records as Ernie Vincent, agrees. "Everything is not complete,but at least you're back in New Orleans," he says. "It's a start, beginning, you know."

Ernie Vincent, 67, says a lot of older folks won't come back to New Orleans East until there are services, a hospital, big stores.

"They're not gonna come back if they don't have some type of facility," he says. "Then the other side of the coin is if they'renot back, then the people who put the facility up say there's not enough people."

What's Wrong With The Recovery Effort?

By a conservative estimate, there are 60,000 people in New Orleans East. That's a little more than half the pre-Katrina population.

Cynthia Townsend, a widow working two jobs as a nurse's assistant, says she's tempted to move nearer to her five grandchildren. She wants to knowwhat's wrong with the recovery effort.

They all remember one study that said to let New Orleans East revert to wetlands. That's not city policy, but the slowness of things makes Townsendwonder.

"We really need to know what their intentions are - are you all working on our behalf, or are you not?" she says. "If you're not going tobe able to do it, then tell us that we can't live here. Put us out."

Her friend and neighbor, Jeane Wooten, says pretty much the same thing.

"What's the master plan? What are they going to do to bring residents to this area? The residents have been back," Wooten says.

She's a fourth-grade science teacher who retired from the New Orleans public schools a few years ago. That was before they fired the whole teachingstaff. She now teaches at a charter school just around the block.

"Why is the recovery taking so long? What's stopping the progress?" Wooten says. "And it's usually money, and it's usually redtape, and it's usually politics."

source: npr

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Edge's blog by Regina O'Numb

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Deal aims to rebuild New Orleans' Lower 9th Ward
Partnership between redevelopment agency, Make It Right to help Lower 9th Ward in New Orleans
Becky Bohrer, Associated Press Writer
Tuesday March 24, 2009, 9:11 am EDT

NEW ORLEANS (AP) -- New Orleans' main redevelopment agency and Brad Pitt's Make It Right foundation are working to rebuild more than houses in thecity's Katrina-scarred Lower 9th Ward.

Under an agreement described by officials Monday, the New Orleans Redevelopment Authority would use the proceeds from the sale of up to 50 properties toMake It Right for neighborhood improvement projects. While no decision has been made on how to invest the money, a grocery store -- a need local residents haverepeatedly cited -- is near the top of the list.

"We're trying to create a win-win," said Ommeed Sathe, NORA's director of real estate and development.

The Lower 9th Ward was devastated by Hurricane Katrina and the levee breaches in August 2005; by one estimate, just 17 percent of the pre-storm populationhas returned. Derelict houses and warped, cracked streets dot the area. There's a school but few businesses or other amenities.

The agreement is unusual. Generally, developers pay appraised, fair-market value for properties, with NORA expected to reinvest the proceeds in such thingsas acquiring new properties or helping to make the homes built more affordable.

The idea behind this agreement is to help build up the neighborhood -- allow Make It Right, which many see as an innovator of green, sustainableconstruction, to focus on building. For NORA, it frees the agency to make new investments to revitalize the neighborhood to improve quality of life.

Sathe wouldn't say how much money the property sales to Make It Right would generate, but he said additional funds, secured by the city's recoveryoffice or other sources, likely would have to be rolled in to attract a business like a grocery store.

He said NORA has a year under the recently signed contract to invest the funds. If that doesn't occur, the funds would revert to NORA for other programuses, though the intent would still be to focus on the Lower 9th, he said.

Make It Right has set an initial goal of building 150 homes near the site of the catastrophic levee breaches, and has received more than 200 applications.So far, eight homes have been completed, six others are being constructed, and the work is having a "catalytic effect," causing other homeowners torebuild, said Make It Right's executive director, Tom Darden.

The organization hopes to purchase up to 50 properties from NORA, and Darden expects swift groundbreaking for a new round of homes. Many of the propertiesthe group is getting are on lots that are already cleared.

The properties are among the estimated 4,450 the state bought from homeowners in New Orleans after Katrina. NORA plans transfers to other developers,nonprofits and individuals in other parts of the Lower 9th Ward.

source: yahoo

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Edge's blog by Regina O'Numb

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Deal aims to rebuild New Orleans' Lower 9th Ward
Partnership between redevelopment agency, Make It Right to help Lower 9th Ward in New Orleans
Becky Bohrer, Associated Press Writer
Tuesday March 24, 2009, 9:11 am EDT

NEW ORLEANS (AP) -- New Orleans' main redevelopment agency and Brad Pitt's Make It Right foundation are working to rebuild more than houses in thecity's Katrina-scarred Lower 9th Ward.

Under an agreement described by officials Monday, the New Orleans Redevelopment Authority would use the proceeds from the sale of up to 50 properties toMake It Right for neighborhood improvement projects. While no decision has been made on how to invest the money, a grocery store -- a need local residents haverepeatedly cited -- is near the top of the list.

"We're trying to create a win-win," said Ommeed Sathe, NORA's director of real estate and development.

The Lower 9th Ward was devastated by Hurricane Katrina and the levee breaches in August 2005; by one estimate, just 17 percent of the pre-storm populationhas returned. Derelict houses and warped, cracked streets dot the area. There's a school but few businesses or other amenities.

The agreement is unusual. Generally, developers pay appraised, fair-market value for properties, with NORA expected to reinvest the proceeds in such thingsas acquiring new properties or helping to make the homes built more affordable.

The idea behind this agreement is to help build up the neighborhood -- allow Make It Right, which many see as an innovator of green, sustainableconstruction, to focus on building. For NORA, it frees the agency to make new investments to revitalize the neighborhood to improve quality of life.

Sathe wouldn't say how much money the property sales to Make It Right would generate, but he said additional funds, secured by the city's recoveryoffice or other sources, likely would have to be rolled in to attract a business like a grocery store.

He said NORA has a year under the recently signed contract to invest the funds. If that doesn't occur, the funds would revert to NORA for other programuses, though the intent would still be to focus on the Lower 9th, he said.

Make It Right has set an initial goal of building 150 homes near the site of the catastrophic levee breaches, and has received more than 200 applications.So far, eight homes have been completed, six others are being constructed, and the work is having a "catalytic effect," causing other homeowners torebuild, said Make It Right's executive director, Tom Darden.

The organization hopes to purchase up to 50 properties from NORA, and Darden expects swift groundbreaking for a new round of homes. Many of the propertiesthe group is getting are on lots that are already cleared.

The properties are among the estimated 4,450 the state bought from homeowners in New Orleans after Katrina. NORA plans transfers to other developers,nonprofits and individuals in other parts of the Lower 9th Ward.

source: yahoo

New Orleans' news here

Edge's blog by Regina O'Numb

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New Orleans hospital notes 3-fold increase in heart attacks after Katrina
By JANET McCONNAUGHEY , Associated Press

Last update: March 27, 2009 - 2:29 PM

NEW ORLEANS - Stress following Hurricane Katrina may still be causing heart attacks years after the storm slammed Louisiana, according to a new study.

Doctors at Tulane University Hospital and Clinic found there was a threefold increase in the rate of heart attacks treated at the hospital since the August2005 storm.

Dr. Anand Irimpen, the study's senior author, said the study is too small to prove the storm is behind the increase.

Even so, most cardiologists in the area believe there has been such an effect, said Dr. Carl "Chip" Lavie, medical director for cardiacrehabilitation and prevention at Ochsner Health System in suburban New Orleans.

"Everyone feels they've lived this," he said.

Many studies have documented increases in heart attacks after a major catastrophe. But this may be the first time anyone has found such an increase morethan two years later, Lavie said.

The report is to be presented Sunday at the American College of Cardiology meeting in Orlando, Fla.

In the two years before Katrina, the researchers found heart attacks accounted for 150 of the 21,229 patients admitted to the downtown hospital. In the twoyears since the hospital reopened in early 2006, there were 246 heart attacks out of 11,282 patients - a change from about 0.7 percent of admissions to nearly2.2 percent.

Post-Katrina heart attack patients also were more likely to need surgery or artery-opening procedures and less likely to have jobs or medical insurance thantheir pre-storm counterparts. They were more likely to smoke or to abuse drugs or alcohol, and less likely to be taking medicine prescribed to ward off strokesor heart attacks.

Because the study looked at a small number of patients at a single hospital, many questions remain open.

"Is Tulane seeing more heart attacks now because of Katrina, or are the heart attacks coming to Tulane that would have gone someplace else before thestorm?" asked Lavie.

The two hospitals nearest Tulane's are still shuttered.

Irimpen, a cardiologist, said he suggested the study because he was being called in much more often to treat heart attacks at Tulane. He said a contributingfactor may be the bad habits that increase under stress, such as smoking, substance abuse and failing to take prescribed medicines.

"We've seen patients who had quit smoking and started again, patients who were exercising and say they haven't exercised since Katrina,"Lavie said.

The research is one of the few multiyear studies of the heart and stress caused by war, terror or disaster, said Dr. Lori Mosca, director of preventivecardiology at New York Presbyterian Hospital

"It really underscores the long-term adverse effects of disasters and chronic stress on the heart," she said.

___

On the Net:

Tulane Medical Center: http://www.tuhc.com/

source: startribune

New Orleans' news here

Edge's blog by Regina O'Numb

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New Orleans hospital notes 3-fold increase in heart attacks after Katrina
By JANET McCONNAUGHEY , Associated Press

Last update: March 27, 2009 - 2:29 PM

NEW ORLEANS - Stress following Hurricane Katrina may still be causing heart attacks years after the storm slammed Louisiana, according to a new study.

Doctors at Tulane University Hospital and Clinic found there was a threefold increase in the rate of heart attacks treated at the hospital since the August2005 storm.

Dr. Anand Irimpen, the study's senior author, said the study is too small to prove the storm is behind the increase.

Even so, most cardiologists in the area believe there has been such an effect, said Dr. Carl "Chip" Lavie, medical director for cardiacrehabilitation and prevention at Ochsner Health System in suburban New Orleans.

"Everyone feels they've lived this," he said.

Many studies have documented increases in heart attacks after a major catastrophe. But this may be the first time anyone has found such an increase morethan two years later, Lavie said.

The report is to be presented Sunday at the American College of Cardiology meeting in Orlando, Fla.

In the two years before Katrina, the researchers found heart attacks accounted for 150 of the 21,229 patients admitted to the downtown hospital. In the twoyears since the hospital reopened in early 2006, there were 246 heart attacks out of 11,282 patients - a change from about 0.7 percent of admissions to nearly2.2 percent.

Post-Katrina heart attack patients also were more likely to need surgery or artery-opening procedures and less likely to have jobs or medical insurance thantheir pre-storm counterparts. They were more likely to smoke or to abuse drugs or alcohol, and less likely to be taking medicine prescribed to ward off strokesor heart attacks.

Because the study looked at a small number of patients at a single hospital, many questions remain open.

"Is Tulane seeing more heart attacks now because of Katrina, or are the heart attacks coming to Tulane that would have gone someplace else before thestorm?" asked Lavie.

The two hospitals nearest Tulane's are still shuttered.

Irimpen, a cardiologist, said he suggested the study because he was being called in much more often to treat heart attacks at Tulane. He said a contributingfactor may be the bad habits that increase under stress, such as smoking, substance abuse and failing to take prescribed medicines.

"We've seen patients who had quit smoking and started again, patients who were exercising and say they haven't exercised since Katrina,"Lavie said.

The research is one of the few multiyear studies of the heart and stress caused by war, terror or disaster, said Dr. Lori Mosca, director of preventivecardiology at New York Presbyterian Hospital

"It really underscores the long-term adverse effects of disasters and chronic stress on the heart," she said.

___

On the Net:

Tulane Medical Center: http://www.tuhc.com/

source: startribune

New Orleans' news here

Edge's blog by Regina O'Numb

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Wire creator turns his camera on New Orleans
STACEY PLAISANCE

Associated Press

March 27, 2009

NEW ORLEANS -- David Simon, creator of the critically acclaimed television shows The Wire and Homicide: Life on the Street is in New Orleans working on hisnext project.

Named after the Creole neighbourhood known for its rich musical history, Treme (pronounced "truh-MAY:) is a prospective TV series possibly for HBO thataims to capture New Orleans' heritage and traditions as residents struggle to recover from Hurricane Katrina.

However, Simon is quick to say it's not just another Katrina project. "This is an American story," he said in an interview from outside a jazzclub where the hour-long pilot was being filmed this week. "This is about an American city trying to pick itself up and doing it without a great deal ofhelp."

To tell the story, Simon abandons almost all the backdrops New Orleans is best known for - the French Quarter and Garden District included - and gets intogrittier, lesser-known neighbourhoods he says have been "under-chronicled."

"We had to get inside New Orleans traditions," he said. "You can't do that from the French Quarter."

He said it was important to capture the city's dysfunction as well as its grace.

"New Orleans is not the most efficient, best-run metropolis in America. It never has been," he said. "But it's a city with an ornate andessential culture and musical tradition that is maybe one of the most original things America ever invented."

He said the story should resonate with Americans considering the recent economic downturn. He compared Americans' faith and reliance on the nation'seconomic structure to New Orleans' faith and reliance in the city's levee system, both of which have proven to be "more fragile than anyone everassumed."

"It's a metaphor for where we are in America right now," he said, standing outside Vaughan's Lounge, a music club near one of thecity's hardest-hit neighbourhoods. The pilot will keep the name of the club. Simon even employed the lounge's regular doorman to play one in theshow.

Simon said he had been wanting to tell a story in New Orleans for more than a decade before Katrina, which hit in August 2005, but "couldn't find ahook."

Much of his Treme writing team is from New Orleans. It includes resident Tom Piazza, author of the nonfiction Why New Orleans Matters and the novel City ofRefuge, and Lolis Eric Elie, a reporter for The Times-Picayune newspaper.

Other writers include George Pelecanos, a crime-novelist and writer for The Wire, and David Mills, a screenwriter for Homicide and The Wire.

The cast includes Steve Zahn, Clarke Peters from The Wire and Kim Dickens from HBO's Deadwood.

Simon and company have been in New Orleans for several weeks filming. The hope is Treme will be picked up by HBO, which has asked to see the pilot and ahandful of scripts to judge before going on with a full first season.

If picked up, it will be the second time in three years a major television network has put New Orleans and Katrina in the spotlight. Fox's post-Katrinadetective drama K-Ville aired during the 2007-08 season but was cancelled due to low ratings and the writers strike.

source:theglobeandmail

New Orleans' news here

Edge's blog by Regina O'Numb

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Wire creator turns his camera on New Orleans
STACEY PLAISANCE

Associated Press

March 27, 2009

NEW ORLEANS -- David Simon, creator of the critically acclaimed television shows The Wire and Homicide: Life on the Street is in New Orleans working on hisnext project.

Named after the Creole neighbourhood known for its rich musical history, Treme (pronounced "truh-MAY:) is a prospective TV series possibly for HBO thataims to capture New Orleans' heritage and traditions as residents struggle to recover from Hurricane Katrina.

However, Simon is quick to say it's not just another Katrina project. "This is an American story," he said in an interview from outside a jazzclub where the hour-long pilot was being filmed this week. "This is about an American city trying to pick itself up and doing it without a great deal ofhelp."

To tell the story, Simon abandons almost all the backdrops New Orleans is best known for - the French Quarter and Garden District included - and gets intogrittier, lesser-known neighbourhoods he says have been "under-chronicled."

"We had to get inside New Orleans traditions," he said. "You can't do that from the French Quarter."

He said it was important to capture the city's dysfunction as well as its grace.

"New Orleans is not the most efficient, best-run metropolis in America. It never has been," he said. "But it's a city with an ornate andessential culture and musical tradition that is maybe one of the most original things America ever invented."

He said the story should resonate with Americans considering the recent economic downturn. He compared Americans' faith and reliance on the nation'seconomic structure to New Orleans' faith and reliance in the city's levee system, both of which have proven to be "more fragile than anyone everassumed."

"It's a metaphor for where we are in America right now," he said, standing outside Vaughan's Lounge, a music club near one of thecity's hardest-hit neighbourhoods. The pilot will keep the name of the club. Simon even employed the lounge's regular doorman to play one in theshow.

Simon said he had been wanting to tell a story in New Orleans for more than a decade before Katrina, which hit in August 2005, but "couldn't find ahook."

Much of his Treme writing team is from New Orleans. It includes resident Tom Piazza, author of the nonfiction Why New Orleans Matters and the novel City ofRefuge, and Lolis Eric Elie, a reporter for The Times-Picayune newspaper.

Other writers include George Pelecanos, a crime-novelist and writer for The Wire, and David Mills, a screenwriter for Homicide and The Wire.

The cast includes Steve Zahn, Clarke Peters from The Wire and Kim Dickens from HBO's Deadwood.

Simon and company have been in New Orleans for several weeks filming. The hope is Treme will be picked up by HBO, which has asked to see the pilot and ahandful of scripts to judge before going on with a full first season.

If picked up, it will be the second time in three years a major television network has put New Orleans and Katrina in the spotlight. Fox's post-Katrinadetective drama K-Ville aired during the 2007-08 season but was cancelled due to low ratings and the writers strike.

source:theglobeandmail

New Orleans' news here

Edge's blog by Regina O'Numb

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Batt on a Hot Tin Roof to Benefit New Orleans Theatre
By Andrew Gans
26 Mar 2009

bryanbatt.jpg

Broadway actor and "Mad Men" star Bryan Batt will offer a performance of his one-man show to benefit the New Orleans theatre Le Petit ThéâtreduVieux Carré.

Entitled Batt on a Hot Tin Roof, the April 11 fundraiser will be held at that Louisiana venue. Show time is 7 PM.

In a statement Batt said, "Le Petit Theatre introduced me to my love of the theatre. I will do whatever is in my power to save this 93-year-oldlandmark that sits on the corner of Jackson Square."

New Orleans resident Bryan Batt - most recently on Broadway in the revival of La Cage aux Folles - has also been seen on The Great White Way as Lumiere inBeauty and the Beast; Monty, the disco DJ, in Saturday Night Fever; the Cat in the Hat in Seussical the Musical; and Sir Percy in Frank Wildhorn's TheScarlet Pimpernel. He also had principal roles in Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, Starlight Express and Cats. The actor-singer-dancer also playedJoe Gillis opposite Betty Buckley's Norma Desmond in Sunset Boulevard and has appeared Off-Broadway in Forbidden Broadway and Jeffrey.

A special post-concert party hosted by Batt will be available to those who purchase tickets at the $100 level.

The 93-year-old Le Petit Théâtre is located at 616 St. Peter Street on the corner of Jackson Square in New Orleans. For tickets, priced $20-$100, call (504)522-2081 or visit www.LePetitTheatre.com.

source: playbill

New Orleans' news here

Edge's blog by Regina O'Numb

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Batt on a Hot Tin Roof to Benefit New Orleans Theatre
By Andrew Gans
26 Mar 2009

bryanbatt.jpg

Broadway actor and "Mad Men" star Bryan Batt will offer a performance of his one-man show to benefit the New Orleans theatre Le Petit ThéâtreduVieux Carré.

Entitled Batt on a Hot Tin Roof, the April 11 fundraiser will be held at that Louisiana venue. Show time is 7 PM.

In a statement Batt said, "Le Petit Theatre introduced me to my love of the theatre. I will do whatever is in my power to save this 93-year-oldlandmark that sits on the corner of Jackson Square."

New Orleans resident Bryan Batt - most recently on Broadway in the revival of La Cage aux Folles - has also been seen on The Great White Way as Lumiere inBeauty and the Beast; Monty, the disco DJ, in Saturday Night Fever; the Cat in the Hat in Seussical the Musical; and Sir Percy in Frank Wildhorn's TheScarlet Pimpernel. He also had principal roles in Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, Starlight Express and Cats. The actor-singer-dancer also playedJoe Gillis opposite Betty Buckley's Norma Desmond in Sunset Boulevard and has appeared Off-Broadway in Forbidden Broadway and Jeffrey.

A special post-concert party hosted by Batt will be available to those who purchase tickets at the $100 level.

The 93-year-old Le Petit Théâtre is located at 616 St. Peter Street on the corner of Jackson Square in New Orleans. For tickets, priced $20-$100, call (504)522-2081 or visit www.LePetitTheatre.com.

source: playbill

New Orleans' news here

Edge's blog by Regina O'Numb

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New Orleans submits bid to host 2013 Super Bowl

Posted: Friday March 27, 2009 7:13PM; Updated: Friday March 27, 2009 11:47PM

NEW ORLEANS (AP) -- Less than four years after Hurricane Katrina tore up the Louisiana Superdome and cast doubt on the future of major professional sportsin New Orleans, the city is formally pronouncing itself ready to bring back the Super Bowl.

The New Orleans Saints and the Greater New Orleans Sports Foundation on Friday submitted a bid to host the NFL's championship game in 2013, which wouldbe the city's 10th Super Bowl and first since the New England Patriots' last-second victory over the St. Louis Rams in 2002.

"With 18,000 downtown hotel rooms, the Superdome, the convention center and French Quarter all within walking distance of each other, New Orleans isstill very well-suited to host this event,'' said Jay Cicero, the sports foundation's president. "The renovated Superdome is very impressiveand with planned improvements the dome will be even better for events like this.''

The Louisiana Superdome got a new roof and major interior renovations - including rebuilt suites, club lounges and new scoreboards - after Katrina andreopened for the 2006 season. The Saints have sold out all three seasons since moving back into the iconic, downtown stadium, which has hosted six SuperBowls.

The state also is preparing to move forward with additional improvements to the dome once the Saints have agreed to a proposed lease extension through 2025.Those enhancements would include reconfigured field-level stands that would result in more premium seats, wider concourses, more concession stands and morebathrooms. Another proposal would increase the number of suites by building new ones where the current press box sits between the dome's second and thirddecks and moving the media up higher in the third deck.

An agreement on a lease extension could prove critical to the success of New Orleans' bid.

The Saints' current lease calls for escalating annual cash subsidies to be paid by the state to the team through the 2010 season, with final paymentsrising to $23.5 million a year beginning this June. After the 2010 season, the subsidies end and Saints can terminate the lease by paying a $15 millionpenalty.

The state is looking to lock the Saints in for at least an additional 15 years by offering a combination of stadium enhancements and continued, but lowered,annual cash subsidies. The current formula for subsidies was based on faulty projections of revenues generated by New Orleans-area hotel and motel taxes. Forseveral years, those revenues have been insufficient to pay the Saints, so the state has been forced to dip into general funds.

Saints spokesmen Greg Bensel said Friday that team owner Tom Benson is "positive about a return of the Super Bowl to New Orleans.''

"Clearly a long term (Superdome) agreement is an important element,'' Bensel continued. "We are anxious to get that componentfinalized.''

Cicero noted there is a precedent for the NFL awarding Super Bowls contingent upon stadium matters being resolved at a later date.

The 2010 Super Bowl originally was awarded to New York on the condition that a new stadium be built in Manhattan. The stadium, which also was part of thecity's unsuccessful Olympic bid, failed to win government approval and the NFL later awarded the game to Miami.

If the state and Saints have yet to reach a new lease agreement by May, but both sides agree they are very close, Benson and his granddaughter, part-ownerRita Benson LeBlanc, still could press fellow NFL owners to approve New Orleans' bid. Phoenix and Miami also are bidding for the game that year.

"The NFL could certainly award it to us contingent upon the (lease extension) being finalized,'' Cicero said. "We're going to have tohave a very competitive bid and Mr. Benson and Rita Benson LeBlanc play a huge role in getting the owners to vote for New Orleans.''

Cicero added that the plan was to offer a bid that compares favorably to those of competing cities and not rely on any sympathy related to the city'songoing recovery from Katrina. New Orleans already has successfully hosted an NBA All-Star game and BCS national championship since Katrina, and is scheduledto host college basketball's men's Final Four in 2012.

"We tell this to all the event owners that are out there,'' Cicero said, "We can still do your event better than anybody else in thecountry, but we also need your event more than anybody else in the country.''

source: cnn

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New Orleans submits bid to host 2013 Super Bowl

Posted: Friday March 27, 2009 7:13PM; Updated: Friday March 27, 2009 11:47PM

NEW ORLEANS (AP) -- Less than four years after Hurricane Katrina tore up the Louisiana Superdome and cast doubt on the future of major professional sportsin New Orleans, the city is formally pronouncing itself ready to bring back the Super Bowl.

The New Orleans Saints and the Greater New Orleans Sports Foundation on Friday submitted a bid to host the NFL's championship game in 2013, which wouldbe the city's 10th Super Bowl and first since the New England Patriots' last-second victory over the St. Louis Rams in 2002.

"With 18,000 downtown hotel rooms, the Superdome, the convention center and French Quarter all within walking distance of each other, New Orleans isstill very well-suited to host this event,'' said Jay Cicero, the sports foundation's president. "The renovated Superdome is very impressiveand with planned improvements the dome will be even better for events like this.''

The Louisiana Superdome got a new roof and major interior renovations - including rebuilt suites, club lounges and new scoreboards - after Katrina andreopened for the 2006 season. The Saints have sold out all three seasons since moving back into the iconic, downtown stadium, which has hosted six SuperBowls.

The state also is preparing to move forward with additional improvements to the dome once the Saints have agreed to a proposed lease extension through 2025.Those enhancements would include reconfigured field-level stands that would result in more premium seats, wider concourses, more concession stands and morebathrooms. Another proposal would increase the number of suites by building new ones where the current press box sits between the dome's second and thirddecks and moving the media up higher in the third deck.

An agreement on a lease extension could prove critical to the success of New Orleans' bid.

The Saints' current lease calls for escalating annual cash subsidies to be paid by the state to the team through the 2010 season, with final paymentsrising to $23.5 million a year beginning this June. After the 2010 season, the subsidies end and Saints can terminate the lease by paying a $15 millionpenalty.

The state is looking to lock the Saints in for at least an additional 15 years by offering a combination of stadium enhancements and continued, but lowered,annual cash subsidies. The current formula for subsidies was based on faulty projections of revenues generated by New Orleans-area hotel and motel taxes. Forseveral years, those revenues have been insufficient to pay the Saints, so the state has been forced to dip into general funds.

Saints spokesmen Greg Bensel said Friday that team owner Tom Benson is "positive about a return of the Super Bowl to New Orleans.''

"Clearly a long term (Superdome) agreement is an important element,'' Bensel continued. "We are anxious to get that componentfinalized.''

Cicero noted there is a precedent for the NFL awarding Super Bowls contingent upon stadium matters being resolved at a later date.

The 2010 Super Bowl originally was awarded to New York on the condition that a new stadium be built in Manhattan. The stadium, which also was part of thecity's unsuccessful Olympic bid, failed to win government approval and the NFL later awarded the game to Miami.

If the state and Saints have yet to reach a new lease agreement by May, but both sides agree they are very close, Benson and his granddaughter, part-ownerRita Benson LeBlanc, still could press fellow NFL owners to approve New Orleans' bid. Phoenix and Miami also are bidding for the game that year.

"The NFL could certainly award it to us contingent upon the (lease extension) being finalized,'' Cicero said. "We're going to have tohave a very competitive bid and Mr. Benson and Rita Benson LeBlanc play a huge role in getting the owners to vote for New Orleans.''

Cicero added that the plan was to offer a bid that compares favorably to those of competing cities and not rely on any sympathy related to the city'songoing recovery from Katrina. New Orleans already has successfully hosted an NBA All-Star game and BCS national championship since Katrina, and is scheduledto host college basketball's men's Final Four in 2012.

"We tell this to all the event owners that are out there,'' Cicero said, "We can still do your event better than anybody else in thecountry, but we also need your event more than anybody else in the country.''

source: cnn

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New Orleans rally draws thousands to protest violence
by Katy Reckdahl, The Times-Picayune
Saturday March 28, 2009, 9:38 PM

large_29rally2.JPG
MATTHEW HINTON / THE TIMES-PICAYUNE
As she speaks about her mother's murder, Ashley Johnson, right, has her tears wiped away by Catherine Raphael, wife of Rev. John Raphael of New HopeBaptist Church, during the Yes We Care rally organized by Rev. Raphael and other clergy to awaken the African-American community to the violence in its midstSaturday in Armstrong Park.

The small black mourning ribbons pinned to their lapels symbolized their losses. But their T-shirts got more to the point: "We are hurtingmothers because of violence," read the big blue capital letters.

Saye Ricard and a group of other mothers joined a crowd of thousands at Armstrong Park this morning for the "Yes We Care" rally organized byAfrican-American churches and community groups that walked from all parts of town, accompanied by brass bands and members of social aid and pleasure clubs.

"A part of me left this earth because of violence," Ricard said, her voice shaking with grief. Ricard's 18-year-old son, Kenneth Davis, Jr., waskilled in January, one of more than 100 killed so far this year in New Orleans.

Many in the crowd were church members, urged to the rally by their pastors.

Denise Evans, 48, attends New Hope Baptist Baptist Church, headed by the Rev. John Raphael, a longtime voice against violence and a leader of today'seffort. She came to the rally with two teenage cousins and said she believes the event could give the black community a sense of "fellowship"again.

Evans remembered the feeling from growing up in the Lower 9th Ward, where all parents used to look out for all children.

With Ricard was Kathy Miller, who wore a black ribbon for her son, Paul Miller, Jr., 23, murdered on June 29, 2005. She stood next to Cheryl Howard, therefor her son Larry Golden, 21, killed on Sept. 11, 2007, and Katherine Keeler, who mourned two sons, Tarik Sparks, 18, and Traydell Keeler, 17, killed a monthapart in 2006.

Keeler said that she lies awake at night, seeing images of her children lying lifeless on hospital beds. The others nodded their heads. They were here atthe rally to try to stop the senseless loss of lives with the hope that no other mothers ever have to endure the unceasing pain they have felt since theyburied their sons.

As Gerald Belonga of the Original Four Social Aid and Pleasure Club walked in behind member of the Hot 8 Brass Band, he spoke of the strength that acommunity has when it stands as one.

"We want that togetherness again," he said.

Norris Henderson, who grew up in Central City and now runs the police and prison watchdog group Safe Streets, said that none of his group's goals couldbe realized without a more tightly knit community.

"This is the first step in a 1,000-mile journey," Henderson said.

large_Care.jpg
Matthew Hinton/The Times-Picayune
Marchers head Saturday morning to the "Yes We Care" rally in downtown New Orleans. The event aimed to give public voice to the grief of relatives ofyoung black men gunned down in the city and to combat future violence.

source: nola

New Orleans' news here

Edge's blog by Regina O'Numb

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New Orleans rally draws thousands to protest violence
by Katy Reckdahl, The Times-Picayune
Saturday March 28, 2009, 9:38 PM

large_29rally2.JPG
MATTHEW HINTON / THE TIMES-PICAYUNE
As she speaks about her mother's murder, Ashley Johnson, right, has her tears wiped away by Catherine Raphael, wife of Rev. John Raphael of New HopeBaptist Church, during the Yes We Care rally organized by Rev. Raphael and other clergy to awaken the African-American community to the violence in its midstSaturday in Armstrong Park.

The small black mourning ribbons pinned to their lapels symbolized their losses. But their T-shirts got more to the point: "We are hurtingmothers because of violence," read the big blue capital letters.

Saye Ricard and a group of other mothers joined a crowd of thousands at Armstrong Park this morning for the "Yes We Care" rally organized byAfrican-American churches and community groups that walked from all parts of town, accompanied by brass bands and members of social aid and pleasure clubs.

"A part of me left this earth because of violence," Ricard said, her voice shaking with grief. Ricard's 18-year-old son, Kenneth Davis, Jr., waskilled in January, one of more than 100 killed so far this year in New Orleans.

Many in the crowd were church members, urged to the rally by their pastors.

Denise Evans, 48, attends New Hope Baptist Baptist Church, headed by the Rev. John Raphael, a longtime voice against violence and a leader of today'seffort. She came to the rally with two teenage cousins and said she believes the event could give the black community a sense of "fellowship"again.

Evans remembered the feeling from growing up in the Lower 9th Ward, where all parents used to look out for all children.

With Ricard was Kathy Miller, who wore a black ribbon for her son, Paul Miller, Jr., 23, murdered on June 29, 2005. She stood next to Cheryl Howard, therefor her son Larry Golden, 21, killed on Sept. 11, 2007, and Katherine Keeler, who mourned two sons, Tarik Sparks, 18, and Traydell Keeler, 17, killed a monthapart in 2006.

Keeler said that she lies awake at night, seeing images of her children lying lifeless on hospital beds. The others nodded their heads. They were here atthe rally to try to stop the senseless loss of lives with the hope that no other mothers ever have to endure the unceasing pain they have felt since theyburied their sons.

As Gerald Belonga of the Original Four Social Aid and Pleasure Club walked in behind member of the Hot 8 Brass Band, he spoke of the strength that acommunity has when it stands as one.

"We want that togetherness again," he said.

Norris Henderson, who grew up in Central City and now runs the police and prison watchdog group Safe Streets, said that none of his group's goals couldbe realized without a more tightly knit community.

"This is the first step in a 1,000-mile journey," Henderson said.

large_Care.jpg
Matthew Hinton/The Times-Picayune
Marchers head Saturday morning to the "Yes We Care" rally in downtown New Orleans. The event aimed to give public voice to the grief of relatives ofyoung black men gunned down in the city and to combat future violence.

source: nola

New Orleans' news here

Edge's blog by Regina O'Numb

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Jazz in New Orleans: A 2009 Status Report
Published: March 30, 2009


By Wade Luquet

It is difficult, if not impossible, to destroy a culture. Hurricane Katrina tried to do so in New Orleans, but New Orleans is proving too strong to be takendown by the flooding that soaked eighty percent of the city. While hundreds of the city's musicians lost their instruments and music collections, many ofthose same musicians returned within a few weeks to open up venues such as Rock n' Bowl, Preservation Hall, and Donna's. Street musicians returned andplayed for the recovery workers as they cleared out the old refrigerators, cars, and home debris that littered the city. And while it took over a year fortourists to return in significant numbers to the city, they have done so and the French Quarter is again active and quite clean, thanks to a new sanitationcontract that calls for "Disney-like" cleaning services.. And I am pleased to report that the jazz scene is as active as ever in New Orleans.

In most cities, jazz is a destination-clubs in various parts of the city that one must intentionally seek out to listen to the music they long to hear. InNew Orleans, jazz is its soundtrack. It would be impossible to walk through the French Quarter and not hear jazz flowing from a street musician or a club. Allof the city's children grow up hearing this musical form flowing through its streets. Some schools even begin their day with its students singing classicNew Orleans tunes such as "Iko Iko" or "Little Liza Jane." Young musicians learn by playing with older musicians on front porches inneighborhoods throughout the city. Katrina was only a temporary setback for Jazz in New Orleans.


It is difficult to separate the venue from the musicians in New Orleans. There are numerous places where great jazz is heard, and each venue lends itspersonality to the music being played. Preservation Hall, Donna's, Fritzel's, The Palm Court, Maison Bourbon, Snug Harbor, dba, The Spotted Cat, andRay's Boom Boom Room are all within a short walk of each other. Vaughn's, Tippitinas, Rock 'n Bowl, The Maple Leaf, Sweet Loraine's, andBullet's are all a short drive from the French Quarter. Each has music seven nights a week playing traditional jazz, New Orleans funk, or Zydeco, and allare drawing sizable crowds of locals and tourists.

"I am often asked how someone can help New Orleans. The best way to help is to visit. Come to the city, enjoy it, let it change you... and leavetips."

The musicians in New Orleans continue to be first rate. Ben Jaffe still draws great traditional bands to Preservation Hall-a venue his parents founded in 1962.Many of the groups playing there are third and fourth generation musicians including the Paulin Brothers. Music director and bassist Brad Truby has drawn greattalent to Fritzel's on Bourbon Street including clarinetists Tim Laughlin and Tom Fischer, pianists John Royen, Steve Pastorius, and Richard Scott,coronetist Connie Jones, and singer Banu Gibson. Donna and Charlie Sims host brass bands nightly that often include drummers Herlin Riley and Shannon Powell.Tuesday nights at the Maple Leaf are reserved for the funk brass of the Rebirth Brass Band while Thursdays at Vaughn's features trumpeter and localpersonality Kermit Ruffin, who also opened his own club, Sydney's Saloon, just outside the French Quarter. Rock 'n Bowl's John Blancher has found awinning combination of bowling, music, and dancing that includes a Wednesday swing night, Thursday Zydeco, and Friday New Orleans jazz lineup. And Tippitinascontinues to feature the best of the new sounds of New Orleans. Snug Harbor brings Ellis Marsalis to the club most Fridays while its neighbors, The Spotted Catand dba, feature old jazz and swing played by groups like The New Orleans Jazz Vipers and The Palmetto Bug Stompers.


There is no lack of places to go to find great music. And interestingly, new clubs are opening up. Chickie Wah Wah on Canal Boulevard is quickly becoming a hotspot with good music in a funky atmosphere. While only two jazz clubs remain on Bourbon Street, a new club was opened at the Royal Sonesta Hotel by thetalented and very busy trumpeter Irvin Mayfield. Mayfield's Jazz Playhouse will feature acts that range from jazz to burlesque and cabaret in a venue thathe hopes will allow its patrons to connect with the music and its makers.


Some of the best musicians can be found playing on the streets of New Orleans for tips. The Quarters' charm and beauty invite strolling and looking forthese important members of the musical ambiance of New Orleans. Visitors often start their mornings at Café du Monde listening to trumpeter and singer HackBartholomew, or have the pleasure of spending the afternoon listening to the guitar and violin duo of Tanya and Dorice. Grandpa Elliot can be found at thecorner of Royal and Toulouse most afternoons singing with his beautiful voice and playing some of the sweetest harmonica ever played. Grandpa Elliot is a trueNew Orleans gem, and many videos exist of him on youtube, including an amazing multi-street musician version of "Stand by Me" produced by theorganization Playing for Change. Royal Street is often closed to vehicle traffic, where clarinetist Doreen Ketchens will set up shop with her band, or brassgroups like Loose Change will slide a piano out of an alley and play for locals, tourists, and dancers who will look for this group so they can practice theirCharlestons and Lindys in the middle of the street. In front of the Cabildo in Jackson Square, brass bands can be found often fronted by members of the Hot 8Brass Band and trombonist Glen David Andrews.


New Orleans is alive with music, and jazz tourists will not be disappointed if they do a little planning and follow their ears. Music listings with times andvenues can be found at Offbeat and are searchable by date. Additional information can be found at the web site of the local public music station WWOZ. Inaddition, there is a live music feed from the station, playing mostly New Orleans music groups. As much fun as planning your week is the unexpected andserendipitous-stumbling upon a new find on the streets and in the small clubs. New Orleans is full of surprises that way-just make sure to use your ears andtake a moment to enjoy your find.


Sadly, there are large parts of the city that are still damaged and abandoned from the flooding, yet the New Orleans music scene has recovered nicely. What itneeds most is avid jazz fans to give witness to its recovery. I am often asked how someone can help New Orleans. The best way to help is to visit. Come to thecity, enjoy it, let it change you... and leave tips. When tourists leave a tip to a musician or a waiter, they are giving direct relief to someone who surelyneeds it. Many of these musicians lost everything in the flood, yet they were some of the first to return to bring the character back to New Orleans. Many ofthe people who returned in the first few months after Katrina noticed how quiet the city was with the music silenced. The music is back. Make your plans now toenjoy this city and the music it has to offer.

Related Video


source: allaboutjazz

New Orleans' news here

Edge's blog by Regina O'Numb

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Jazz in New Orleans: A 2009 Status Report
Published: March 30, 2009


By Wade Luquet

It is difficult, if not impossible, to destroy a culture. Hurricane Katrina tried to do so in New Orleans, but New Orleans is proving too strong to be takendown by the flooding that soaked eighty percent of the city. While hundreds of the city's musicians lost their instruments and music collections, many ofthose same musicians returned within a few weeks to open up venues such as Rock n' Bowl, Preservation Hall, and Donna's. Street musicians returned andplayed for the recovery workers as they cleared out the old refrigerators, cars, and home debris that littered the city. And while it took over a year fortourists to return in significant numbers to the city, they have done so and the French Quarter is again active and quite clean, thanks to a new sanitationcontract that calls for "Disney-like" cleaning services.. And I am pleased to report that the jazz scene is as active as ever in New Orleans.

In most cities, jazz is a destination-clubs in various parts of the city that one must intentionally seek out to listen to the music they long to hear. InNew Orleans, jazz is its soundtrack. It would be impossible to walk through the French Quarter and not hear jazz flowing from a street musician or a club. Allof the city's children grow up hearing this musical form flowing through its streets. Some schools even begin their day with its students singing classicNew Orleans tunes such as "Iko Iko" or "Little Liza Jane." Young musicians learn by playing with older musicians on front porches inneighborhoods throughout the city. Katrina was only a temporary setback for Jazz in New Orleans.


It is difficult to separate the venue from the musicians in New Orleans. There are numerous places where great jazz is heard, and each venue lends itspersonality to the music being played. Preservation Hall, Donna's, Fritzel's, The Palm Court, Maison Bourbon, Snug Harbor, dba, The Spotted Cat, andRay's Boom Boom Room are all within a short walk of each other. Vaughn's, Tippitinas, Rock 'n Bowl, The Maple Leaf, Sweet Loraine's, andBullet's are all a short drive from the French Quarter. Each has music seven nights a week playing traditional jazz, New Orleans funk, or Zydeco, and allare drawing sizable crowds of locals and tourists.

"I am often asked how someone can help New Orleans. The best way to help is to visit. Come to the city, enjoy it, let it change you... and leavetips."

The musicians in New Orleans continue to be first rate. Ben Jaffe still draws great traditional bands to Preservation Hall-a venue his parents founded in 1962.Many of the groups playing there are third and fourth generation musicians including the Paulin Brothers. Music director and bassist Brad Truby has drawn greattalent to Fritzel's on Bourbon Street including clarinetists Tim Laughlin and Tom Fischer, pianists John Royen, Steve Pastorius, and Richard Scott,coronetist Connie Jones, and singer Banu Gibson. Donna and Charlie Sims host brass bands nightly that often include drummers Herlin Riley and Shannon Powell.Tuesday nights at the Maple Leaf are reserved for the funk brass of the Rebirth Brass Band while Thursdays at Vaughn's features trumpeter and localpersonality Kermit Ruffin, who also opened his own club, Sydney's Saloon, just outside the French Quarter. Rock 'n Bowl's John Blancher has found awinning combination of bowling, music, and dancing that includes a Wednesday swing night, Thursday Zydeco, and Friday New Orleans jazz lineup. And Tippitinascontinues to feature the best of the new sounds of New Orleans. Snug Harbor brings Ellis Marsalis to the club most Fridays while its neighbors, The Spotted Catand dba, feature old jazz and swing played by groups like The New Orleans Jazz Vipers and The Palmetto Bug Stompers.


There is no lack of places to go to find great music. And interestingly, new clubs are opening up. Chickie Wah Wah on Canal Boulevard is quickly becoming a hotspot with good music in a funky atmosphere. While only two jazz clubs remain on Bourbon Street, a new club was opened at the Royal Sonesta Hotel by thetalented and very busy trumpeter Irvin Mayfield. Mayfield's Jazz Playhouse will feature acts that range from jazz to burlesque and cabaret in a venue thathe hopes will allow its patrons to connect with the music and its makers.


Some of the best musicians can be found playing on the streets of New Orleans for tips. The Quarters' charm and beauty invite strolling and looking forthese important members of the musical ambiance of New Orleans. Visitors often start their mornings at Café du Monde listening to trumpeter and singer HackBartholomew, or have the pleasure of spending the afternoon listening to the guitar and violin duo of Tanya and Dorice. Grandpa Elliot can be found at thecorner of Royal and Toulouse most afternoons singing with his beautiful voice and playing some of the sweetest harmonica ever played. Grandpa Elliot is a trueNew Orleans gem, and many videos exist of him on youtube, including an amazing multi-street musician version of "Stand by Me" produced by theorganization Playing for Change. Royal Street is often closed to vehicle traffic, where clarinetist Doreen Ketchens will set up shop with her band, or brassgroups like Loose Change will slide a piano out of an alley and play for locals, tourists, and dancers who will look for this group so they can practice theirCharlestons and Lindys in the middle of the street. In front of the Cabildo in Jackson Square, brass bands can be found often fronted by members of the Hot 8Brass Band and trombonist Glen David Andrews.


New Orleans is alive with music, and jazz tourists will not be disappointed if they do a little planning and follow their ears. Music listings with times andvenues can be found at Offbeat and are searchable by date. Additional information can be found at the web site of the local public music station WWOZ. Inaddition, there is a live music feed from the station, playing mostly New Orleans music groups. As much fun as planning your week is the unexpected andserendipitous-stumbling upon a new find on the streets and in the small clubs. New Orleans is full of surprises that way-just make sure to use your ears andtake a moment to enjoy your find.


Sadly, there are large parts of the city that are still damaged and abandoned from the flooding, yet the New Orleans music scene has recovered nicely. What itneeds most is avid jazz fans to give witness to its recovery. I am often asked how someone can help New Orleans. The best way to help is to visit. Come to thecity, enjoy it, let it change you... and leave tips. When tourists leave a tip to a musician or a waiter, they are giving direct relief to someone who surelyneeds it. Many of these musicians lost everything in the flood, yet they were some of the first to return to bring the character back to New Orleans. Many ofthe people who returned in the first few months after Katrina noticed how quiet the city was with the music silenced. The music is back. Make your plans now toenjoy this city and the music it has to offer.

Related Video


source: allaboutjazz

New Orleans' news here

Edge's blog by Regina O'Numb

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sad to see him go. i photographed a wedding last year that he played at since he knew the bride and groom. my wife used to walk with him to work when we firstmoved here 15 yrs ago and lived on esplanade ave.

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Don't forget about Fr Qtr Fest, just as good as Jazzfest IMHO. Less heat :)

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Nawlins wrote:

Don't forget about Fr Qtr Fest, just as good as Jazzfest IMHO. Less heat
:)

Absolutely true - I am usually working a booth for Fr Q Fest - but unfortunately have to be of of town that weekend. Everybody else, come down April 17 - 19and ENJOY!!!

 

French Quarter Festivals

 

 

French Quarter Festivals, Inc.

400 North Peters Street • Suite 205 New Orleans, LA 70130 • (504) 522-5730 • (800) 673-5725 • Fax (504) 522-5711 • Email

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Benefit helps New Orleans

April 3, 2009

bilde?Site=DO&Date=20090403&Category=ENTERTAINMENT09&ArtNo=904030311&Ref=AR&Profile=1005&MaxW=180&Border=0

bilde?Site=DO&Date=20090403&Category=ENTERTAINMENT09&ArtNo=904030311&Ref=V2&Profile=1005&MaxW=180&Border=0

Little Richard and Chuck Berry are dusting off the songbook of a New Orleans legend to raise money for the city's parks and schools.

They're part of a May 30 concert at the New Orleans Arena called "The Domino Effect" because they'll be performing songs popularized byNew Orleans native and Rock and Roll Hall of Fame artist Fats Domino.

The concert is a fundraising event for a charity run by New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees called "Operation Kids," which has raised morethan $1.5 million since 2007.

Domino, who is 81, has been invited to attend the concert but will not perform. He lives in suburban New Orleans.

Brees says he's thrilled about the lineup, which includes Keb Mo, Junior Brown and Taj Mahal

source: news-leader

New Orleans' news here

Edge's blog by Regina O'Numb

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Benefit helps New Orleans

April 3, 2009

bilde?Site=DO&Date=20090403&Category=ENTERTAINMENT09&ArtNo=904030311&Ref=AR&Profile=1005&MaxW=180&Border=0

bilde?Site=DO&Date=20090403&Category=ENTERTAINMENT09&ArtNo=904030311&Ref=V2&Profile=1005&MaxW=180&Border=0

Little Richard and Chuck Berry are dusting off the songbook of a New Orleans legend to raise money for the city's parks and schools.

They're part of a May 30 concert at the New Orleans Arena called "The Domino Effect" because they'll be performing songs popularized byNew Orleans native and Rock and Roll Hall of Fame artist Fats Domino.

The concert is a fundraising event for a charity run by New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees called "Operation Kids," which has raised morethan $1.5 million since 2007.

Domino, who is 81, has been invited to attend the concert but will not perform. He lives in suburban New Orleans.

Brees says he's thrilled about the lineup, which includes Keb Mo, Junior Brown and Taj Mahal

source: news-leader

New Orleans' news here

Edge's blog by Regina O'Numb

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Vicksburg native's film to debut in New Orleans Sunday
By Manivanh Chanprasith
Published:
Saturday, April 4, 2009 4:54 PM CDT

doc49d65b318df5a769107750.jpg

On Sunday, a 1995 Vicksburg High School graduate will premier her debut documentary, "No Cross, No Crown," at the sixth annual New OrleansInternational Human Rights Film Festival.

A.M. ("Amy") Peters' film about post-Hurricane Katrina New Orleans will be shown at 9 p.m. at the Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary ArtsCenter.

"Katrina exposed what outsiders don't see," said Peters. "I saw New Orleans before Katrina, and I saw the racism, the bad schools - andthen I saw the good parts, too."

Peters has a bachelor's degree in environmental biology from the University of Southern Mississippi. While in college, she was interested inenvironmental racism. Upon graduation, she went to work for ACORN - the Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now - a community-based advocateorganization for low- and moderate-income families.

In "No Cross, No Crown," Peters includes local musicians' and artists' points-of-view of the aftermath of Katrina. The two-year project ofdocumenting the music and culture of New Orleans, post-Katrina, came after Peters began speaking with native musicians who were displaced to New York Cityafter the hurricane.

The documentary features music with origins in New Orleans including DJ Soul Sister, Kermit Ruffins, author Tom Piazza and Mardi Gras Indian Chief AlfredDoucette.

"I wanted people to feel and see all the different voices because New Orleans is a patchwork," said Peters.

In the documentary, Peters wanted to not only show the physical damage of Katrina, but wanted to also capture the damage to the spirit of the New Orleansculture.

"I did not want it to be angry, political or partisan," she said.

"No Cross, No Crown" is Peters' first feature film, but she has dabbled in animation and shorts. While growing up in Vicksburg, she enjoyedhearing local bands play.

"I think Vicksburg is the kind of town you want to grow up in," Peters said. "They accept a lot of people."

Peters is the daughter of John and Bonnie Peters of Vicksburg. She resides in Staten Island, N.Y.

She hopes the people of New Orleans like her work and aims to "take the film all the way. It says what I wanted to say. I got a lot of experience fromit."

Peters' next project is a sequel to her animated short film, "Jack Quack (The Path)."

Contact Manivanh Chanprasith at mchanprasith@vicksburgpost.com.
source: vicksburgpost

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Edge's blog by Regina O'Numb

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