Recommended Posts

...all in Vancouver I hear... rehearsals now underway... and so it begins...

Squeeee!!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

HAPPY DAYS. Let the show begin. Wouldn't have expected anything less from Adam. Japan to Vancouver....I'd do the same! :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

HAPPY DAYS. Let the show begin. Wouldn't have expected anything less from Adam. Japan to Vancouver....I'd do the same! :D

  Yeah, me too....Not sure about Vancouver but Japan .... WooooHoooo !!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bono and Edge were at " Murakami " don't know what it is but it sounds and looks Japanese and great....

Nice to see Bono in top shape !

Edited by pain_18_

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, mich40 said:

 

Wow. Beautiful photograph. Unique, too. (Sans sunglasses, but it looks like evening there.) Ah...how great to be where there are palm trees!

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/25/2017 at 1:08 PM, bigwave said:

...all in Vancouver I hear... rehearsals now underway... and so it begins...

 

If I've never said it b4, you've got one of the best U2 gifs around. I could watch it for 2 or 3 minutes straight if I had 2 or 3 minutes to spare, which I don't, Lol. (Set to the tune of 'It's a beautiful day') : It's a beautiful thing! (The heart is a bloom. Pushes up through the stony ground!...)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

MEET LARRY MULLEN, JR. FOR A GOOD CAUSE

 

@U2, June 14, 2017
By: Tassoula E. Kokkoris

 

Want to spend some time with Larry Mullen, Jr., one-to-one at one of the band's upcoming concerts? Now's your chance! The drummer is donating a personal meet-and-greet with the highest bidder via a just-announced Charity Buzz auction

Bidding starts at $1,000; the "prize" is estimated at $6,000 and also includes two tickets to one of the two sold-out Rome shows.

Proceeds from the auction benefit Facing Addiction, a "national non-profit organization dedicated to finding solutions to the addiction crisis by unifying the voice of the over 45 million Americans and their families directly impacted by addiction."

The bidding concludes June 29 (thanks to Vid for the tip).

 

Via Atu2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, tan_lejos_tan_cerca said:

MEET LARRY MULLEN, JR. FOR A GOOD CAUSE

 

@U2, June 14, 2017
By: Tassoula E. Kokkoris

 

Want to spend some time with Larry Mullen, Jr., one-to-one at one of the band's upcoming concerts? Now's your chance! The drummer is donating a personal meet-and-greet with the highest bidder via a just-announced Charity Buzz auction

Bidding starts at $1,000; the "prize" is estimated at $6,000 and also includes two tickets to one of the two sold-out Rome shows.

Proceeds from the auction benefit Facing Addiction, a "national non-profit organization dedicated to finding solutions to the addiction crisis by unifying the voice of the over 45 million Americans and their families directly impacted by addiction."

The bidding concludes June 29 (thanks to Vid for the tip).

 

Via Atu2

 WOW !!!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

U2’s The Edge talks up food as an anti-cancer weapon

 
 
 
By Laurie McGinley June 20 at 3:13 PM 
theedge13.jpg&w=1484
David Howell Evans, better known as The Edge of the rock band U2, in Washington. (Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post)

The lead guitarist of U2, the rock band playing at FedEx Field on Tuesday night, has more on his mind than music. In 2006, The Edge's 7-year-old daughter was diagnosed with leukemia, something that he says sent him “into a complete tailspin.” Sian recovered and is now 19.

The experience heightened the legendary musician's interest in health and cancer, and especially in angiogenesis, which focuses on the formation of blood vessels. In recent years, several anti-angiogenesis drugs have been developed to disrupt the blood supply that cancers need to grow.

Yet The Edge, whose real name is David Howell Evans, is convinced that certain foods can play a similar role, and he's pressing for more research. He's a board member of the Angiogenesis Foundation, a Cambridge, Mass.-based nonprofit group headed by physician William Li, an internist who studied under angiogenesis pioneer Judah Folkman.

Interest in using food as an anti-cancer weapon is intense among consumers looking to reduce their risks. But the idea that foods such as green tea or blueberries can starve tumors is controversial — “unsettled science,” as Otis Brawley, chief medical and scientific officer of the American Cancer Society, puts it.

The cancer society avoids saying that any particular food will ward off the disease, though it stresses that eating lots of fresh fruits and vegetables is linked to a reduced risk. Still, Brawley is enthusiastic about The Edge's emphasis on a healthy diet, saying the recommendations could help combat obesity, which itself is linked to an increased risk of cancer.

Similarly, National Institutes of Health Director Francis Collins praises The Edge's interest in angiogenesis. (Collins met Monday with Li and the guitarist and joined the latter in playing “Hallelujah” on their respective guitars.) He also notes, however, that “there's no definitive evidence” of certain foods being anti-angiogenic and more research is needed.

During his visit to Washington, The Edge and Li visited Capitol Hill on Monday to argue for more research on the issue. They also talked to The Washington Post. The following has been edited for length and clarity:

Q: How did your daughter's experience affect you?

The Edge: When my daughter was first diagnosed with leukemia, I was, I guess like any parent would be, sent into a complete tailspin. Coming out of that, part of what I was determined to do was to fully understand what this meant.

The good news is that chemotherapy protocols are very well understood and the success rate is high. So you don’t need to try anything different. As it happens, we were able to take advantage of [Li’s expertise] to provide dietary changes to offer additional support to combat the disease.

What I really felt acutely, having brought my daughter through this treatment, is we can do better than chemotherapy. It's brutal, it’s very crude; you basically are killing cancer cells at a slightly higher rate than you are killing normal cells. As a strategy, it seemed like a blunt instrument. I couldn’t imagine that we couldn’t do better.

When I discovered the angiogenesis approach, I thought: “This is part of the future. It might not be the whole future, but it's part of it.”

Q: How are you trying to promote that approach?

The Edge: We’re communicating with scientists from other fields, talking to government officials about what we know and where we see the future and also doing public outreach. … We’re just trying to encourage greater interest in this area.

The emphasis surely has to be on focusing more on prevention, and angiogenesis and diet is an obvious place to look.

Li: We want to use the tools of biotechnology to ask questions about how foods actually work in the body. This is almost a redefinition or reconceptualization of nutrition itself, away from macro- and micronutrients to ask, “What happens to foods when they encounter human cells?”

We are really at the beginning of this era of research to begin understanding how whole foods, combinations of whole foods, and even how they are prepared and even the variations between the different varieties of food can make a difference.

Q: It’s hard to prove that any particular food can prevent cancer. What is the evidence that the specific foods might actually protect people from the disease? 

The Edge: Some of it is in the state of being a very good theory, a theory that has a lot of evidence around it, population studies, there are actually laboratory tests that the foundation has funded where you literally grow human cells in a petri dish and see what happens when certain foods are added.

Of course, that wouldn’t pass muster as hard, scientific, FDA-approved proof. But it’s really compelling when you start to see in petri dish that these foods are really having an effect which in some cases rivals pharmacology. What we really need is for the government to step in and fund this research … the system is set up for Big Pharma developing drugs with big profit margins. We don’t want them to stop, but what isn’t being done right now is a lot of funding of greater understanding of these molecules in food.

Li: It’s tempting for all of us in biomedicine to want the magic bullet, the one thing to make everything else go away, but the body of research has shown that both health and disease are much more complicated. We think that food is one of the pieces of the puzzle of life that deserves the kind of modern scientific approach that has taken biotech to where it is today. And when you marry together all the tools that are available with what we put on our plate and the choices we make in the grocery store and the market, we think there is literally an undiscovered country that can contribute to the health of society.

What we’re really trying to do is develop a platform of understanding not just one food but many foods and combinations of foods. One of our first priorities is to systematically study whole, unprocessed foods using laboratory assays that have been used traditionally for drug discovery.

Q: What do you eat?

The Edge: I actually do eat berries every day, different ones, and whole food as much as I can. I eat foods with antiangiogenic properties.

Read more:

Teen tobacco use hits record low, with sharp drop in e-cigarettes 

This cancer doctor is running for Congress. Here's why.

Cancer drugs are so high that doctors will test cutting doses

 
pixel?mid=00bb70a80ee8f020d9011cbcef307fe64d

Via Atu2

Edited by tan_lejos_tan_cerca

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

WOW......... Healthy food is a luxury nowadays......The simplest things are the hardest to achieve.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BONO MULTITASKING ON CAPITOL HILL TODAY

 

@U2, June 21, 2017
By: Tassoula E. Kokkoris

 

As several tweets sprung to life showing Bono walking through the U.S. Capitol, many wondered what he was up to as he didn't have time to stop for photos or autographs.

USA Today solved the mystery, reporting that he was there to meet with House Speaker Paul Ryan and visit with the staff of Rep. Steve Scalise, who was shot last week at a congressional baseball practice.

He's using this time in Washington, D.C. to lobby both sides of the political aisle for international affairs funding in the coming year.

Read the full story here.

Via Atu2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

These posts make my heart adore U2 as humans even more...lovely...thanks to all who are posting on this thread!!!!

:JT_Logo_03:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Adam Clayton credits rock friends for helping him kick alcoholism

Updated / Tuesday, 27 Jun 2017 14:12
1

Adam Clayton says rocker friends helped him stop drinking

Adam Clayton says rocker friends helped him stop drinking

Adam Clayton has credited guitarist Eric Clapton, The Who's Pete Townshend and his U2 bandmates for helping him kick alcoholism.

The bassist thanked the legendary rockers, as well as his fellow U2 stars, for advising him to stop drinking and helping him along the recovery process as he received an award on Monday in New York by MusiCares, a foundation he supports that helps musicians get treatment for addiction.

 
View image on Twitter

 

 
 

Taking to the stage, the 57-year-old U2 star joked: "I'm not used to achieving anything on my own."

His speech quickly became heartfelt and frank. "I'm an alcoholic, addict, but in some ways that devastating disease is what drove me towards this wonderful life I now have", he said. "It's just that I couldn't take my friend alcohol. At some point I had to leave it behind and claim my full potential."

Clayton said he thought his life as a rock star would be over if he gave up drinking as so much of their careers revolve around the  night.

"But two heroes of mine were there for me and it meant a great deal that they would try to convince me otherwise," he said.

"After two particularly destructive benders Eric Clapton was there on the end of the phone. He didn't sugar-coat it, he told me that I needed to change my life and that I wouldn't regret it.

"He gave me the name of a treatment centre and the power to make a call to them. And whilst I was going through that five-week programme, Pete Townshend visited me and again put steel on my back."

Clayton added: "I was lucky because I had three friends who could see what was going on and who loved me enough to take up the slack of my failings.

"Bono, The Edge and Larry (Mullen Jr) truly supported me before and after I entered recovery and I am unreservedly grateful for their friendship, understanding and support."

U2 played three songs at the event, Stuck in a Moment You Can't Get Out Of, Vertigo and I Will Follow.

 

View image on Twitter
 
The event also featured performances by rapper Michael Franti, Jack Garratt, reggae singer Chronixx, Macy Gray, and The Lumineers, who are currently appearing with U2 on their Joshua Tree tour.

 

Via U2 Vision Over Visibility

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.