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30/03/2018

‘Tuned In’ at Sligo International Chamber Music Festival, May Bank Holiday weekend 2018

‘Tuned In’ at Sligo International Chamber Music Festival, May Bank Holiday weekend 2018

Music Generation Sligo in partnership with the Sligo International Chamber Music Festival will present the third annual ‘Tuned In’ residential programme over three days this May Bank Holiday weekend. Curated by Professor James Cavanagh(RIAM), this short, intensive chamber music experience for young wind and strings ensembles and their tutors takes place at The Model, Sligo.

The programme, aimed at young musicians age 13+ from Sligo and throughout Ireland, incorporates masterclasses and performances and provides opportunities to develop skills in ensemble playing within the classical genre. The weekend also brings young musicians into the audience to experience live performances of an international standard, and enables participants to engage with high level artists in the nurturing environment of the Festival.

Masterclasses will be led by members of the Vogler Quartet and other Festival performers, and the three-day experience will culminate in a finale performance by the young musicians on Sunday 6 May, 5pm, at The Model.

‘The holistic experience of music that the weekend offered was quite incredible.  Thank you so much for giving us the opportunity to be part of it.’ (Tuned In 2017 participant)

Established in 2000, the Sligo International Chamber Music Festival takes place in St Columba’s Church Drumcliffe and The Model Sligo from 4 to 7 May 2018. Developed by Artistic Director Tim Vogler, the Festival programme features internationally acclaimed ensemble-in-residence, the Vogler Quartet, alongside artists including Christiane Oelze (soprano), Jonathan Ware (piano), Christopher Ellis (cello), Erlendis Guitar Quartet, Katherine Hunka (violin), Silver-Garburg Piano Duo and Dermot Dunne (accordion).

Early Bird ticket discounts are available for all Festival events if purchased before midnight, Wednesday 11 April 2018.

To book tickets and for more information about Tuned In and the full Festival progamme visit: www.sligochambermusic.ie

Tuned In is funded as a Music Generation National Partnership Project, in association with Music Generation Sligo. Sligo International Chamber Music Festival is produced by Sligo County Council Arts Office and Music Generation Sligo, funded by Sligo County Council, the Arts Council and Music Generation Sligo.

For further information about Tuned In and other Music Generation Sligo programmes contact:

Rhona McGrath, Coordinator / Emma Smith, Administrator
Music Generation Sligo, Mayo, Sligo & Leitrim Education and Training Board, Quay Street, Sligo

T: 071 9138306
E: MusicGenerationSligo@msletb.ie
musicgenerationsligo.com

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Today will see the return of special superhero volunteer team from a special four week aid delivery and Dental Mission!

Chernobyl Kilkenny Outreach Group leader, Jim Kavanagh, has lead a very special trip over Europe to Belarus where they delivered vital aid and tens of thousands of nappies! Jim and team were accompanied by our Dental Team, which waspioneered by the National Volunteers of the Year Mary and George Sugrue from Chernobyl Children International Dental Programme Tralee.

The team will traveled through nine European countries before arriving at its final destination in Belarus, spent weeks travelling through Belarus to deliver aid and treat 98 children, and returned over land for the past week.

Welcome home to these superhero volunteer team and thank you for all you do for the children of Chernobyl.

La imagen puede contener: 3 personas, personas sonriendo, personas de pie, exterior y texto

La imagen puede contener: 4 personas, personas de pie, cielo y exterior

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Nigerian Reporter Wins 2018 Michael Elliott Award for Excellence in African Storytelling

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    Toll of Terrorism: Abubakar Ibrahim reported on two women displaced by Boko Haram, struggling to find their loved ones.

Abubakar Ibrahim, a Nigerian reporter and editor whose work conveys the human toll of terrorism and displacement, has been named winner of the 2018 Michael Elliott Award for Excellence in African Storytelling. A distinguished jury selected him from among 238 applicants for this prize.

The prestigious award is given by the International Center for Journalists (ICFJ) in partnership with ONE and the Elliott family. It was established in 2016 in honor of Michael Elliott, an outstanding editor and philanthropist whose life was a testament to the power of storytelling to bear witness to and improve the human condition. The prize aims to advance the work of an emerging journalist covering Africa who strives to strengthen people’s voices and improve their well-being. The inaugural winner was Kenyan health reporter Mercy Juma.

Ibrahim works as a news editor at the Daily Trust in Abuja, Nigeria. His story All That Was Familiar, published in Granta magazine in May 2017 puts a human face on a story often expressed in numbers: More than 2 million people from northeastern Nigeria, northern Cameroon and southern Niger have been internally displaced since Boko Haram began its insurgency. Ibrahim tells about the struggle of two women, one from Cameroon and one from Nigeria, to find their loved ones and return home.

“Mike would be thrilled by the breadth and depth of talent displayed by the entrants for this year’s award,” said Emma Oxford, Elliott’s widow. “The Elliott family, along with ONE, ICFJ and many generous supporters, is proud to help support the development of quality journalism in Africa. I am hugely grateful to the staff of ICFJ and my fellow judges for their thoughtful review of the broad range of entries.”

The winning story “exemplifies outstanding storytelling on a difficult and important topic. Abubakar’s fearless reporting and powerful writing brought home to me the hardships faced by women, in particular, displaced by the scourge of Boko Haram,” Oxford said.

Two broadcast journalists were commended as finalists for the award: Lindile Yolisa Mpanza of South Africa’s SABC Digital news, for her report on sexual abuse of widows; and Ridwan Karim Dini-Osman of Ghana’s GHOne, for his coverage of a community in crisis because its drinking water is contaminated.

Ibrahim will receive the award and a cash prize at a reception in New York on May 24. He also will spend time in U.S. newsrooms to learn new skills and share knowledge in an intensive, customized program run by ICFJ. The goal is to help to deepen future reporting that engages and empowers Africans. The international panel that selected Ibrahim was chaired by Norman Pearlstine, chief information architect, Money.net and former vice chairman of Time Inc., and included:

  • Lionel Barber, editor, Financial Times
  • Joyce Barnathan, president, International Center for Journalists
  • Matthew Bishop, managing director, Bellagio Center, The Rockefeller Foundation
  • Joachim Buwembo, former ICFJ Knight Fellow based in Uganda
  • Erik Charas, founder, @Verdade newspaper based in Mozambique and member of ONE's Africa Policy Advisory Board
  • Kate Critchley, interim executive director, Europe department, ONE
  • Nic Dawes, deputy executive director for media, Human Rights Watch, and member of ONE's Africa Policy Advisory Board
  • Jamie Drummond, co-founder and executive director, global strategy, ONE
  • Jerri Eddings, senior program director, ICFJ
  • Daniel Franklin, executive editor, The Economist
  • Mercy Juma, reporter, BBC Kenya and inaugural award winner
  • Rik Kirkland, partner, Global Publishing, McKinsey & Company and ICFJ Director
  • Chika Oduah, freelance journalist based in Senegal
  • Declan Okpalaeke, former ICFJ Knight Fellow based in Nigeria
  • Emma Oxford, author, “At Least We Lived”

Elliott served as a top editor at The Economist, Newsweek and Time before becoming CEO of ONE. A passionate writer and editor with a gift for unraveling complex issues, he shone a light on global development issues and the people at their center.

A longtime board member of ICFJ, Elliott championed great journalism as a tool for empowerment. As ONE’s CEO, he lobbied to improve the lives of all Africans. Shortly before his untimely death in 2016, he spoke of his dream to establish an award that would bring together his belief in great journalism with his commitment to progress in Africa.

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5 ethically made Mother’s Day gifts for empowered women
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CULTURE

5 ethically made Mother’s Day gifts for empowered women

May 4 2018 | By: MICAELA IVESON

 

 

 

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Join the fight against extreme poverty

 
  

Mother’s Day is right around the corner! Whether you’re shopping for your mother, grandmother, wife, or aunt, the ONE Store is stocked with thoughtful gifts that are the perfect fit for the important women in your life. PLUS, these gifts contribute to economic empowerment for women throughout Africa! We hand-picked a few of our favorites below:

1. ABLE scarves

ABLE-scarf.jpg

When a woman earns a living wage, she is able to invest in herself, her family, and her community. Our friends at ABLE, the ethical lifestyle brand that brought us these scarves, were so inspired by that idea that they created this beautiful, unique scarf. Made from 100% Ethiopian cotton, it’s hand-crafted by female artisans who receive fair wages for their work, and screen printed with their powerful messages about how opportunity transformed their lives.

2. Daphne bracelets

Daphne-bracelets.jpg

We love items that are more than what they seem. That’s why these 31Bits bracelets — with beads are made from recycled paper! — caught our eyes immediately. Not only are they made from unexpected materials, but the skilled artisans who craft them earn more than just a living wage — they also have access to micro-financing and mentorship opportunities.

3. ‘None of us are equal’ t-shirt

None-of-us-are-equal-tshirt.jpg

Nowhere on earth do women have as many opportunities as men — nowhere. But the gender gap is wider for women living in extreme poverty. ONE created the Poverty is Sexist campaign to draw attention to that injustice — and to inspire our members with the fact that, truly, none of us are equal until all of us are equal. Grab this soft cotton tee for a powerful woman in your life — and maybe one for yourself, too!

4. ONE Moleskine notebook

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Your mother can put pen to paper on her ambitious, game-changing ideas with our exclusive Moleskine notebook! Featuring our signature “Actions Speak Louder” slogan and ONE logo, this notebook will inspire her every times she uses it. It comes with a built-in bookmark and collapsable inner pocket.

 

5. ONE x Camfed beaded bracelets

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A quality education is the foundation of a successful career. That’s why we teamed up with Relate and Camfed to make these exclusive beaded bracelets. Sales from each and every one benefit Camfed, an organization dedicated to tackling poverty and inequality by supporting marginalised girls to go to school and succeed and by empowering young women to step up as leaders of change.

Bonus: The inspi(RED) t-shirt!

RED-shirt.jpg

If these gifts left you feeling inspired, you’re not alone! That’s why we wanted to give a shoutout to this exclusive tee, brought to us by (RED). A portion of each purchase supports (RED)’s effort to fight HIV/AIDS through the Global Fund — a program that has saved 22 million lives to date! Grab one for your mother (or for yourself!) and keep inspiring the change you wish to see in the world.

 

Mother’s Day is a special time to celebrate the brilliant, badass women in your life. And by purchasing a gift from the ONE Store, you can also make an impact in the lives of skilled female artisans and entrepreneurs throughout Africa. Shop now!

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MICAELA IVESON
May 4 2018

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MAY 10, 2018

 

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GIRLS & WOMEN

Palestine Is the Latest Middle Eastern State to Repeal ‘Marry-Your-Rapist’ Law

It joins Jordan, Lebanon, Tunisia, and others.

Calling it a “good first step,” international organization Human Rights Watch (HRW) praised Palestine on Thursday for repealing a law allowing rapists to marry their victims.  

Although the law, which dates back to 1960, was officially repealed in March, HRW called on Palestine and other countries in the region to do more to stem violence against women. 

“The Palestinian Authority has finally closed disturbing colonial-era and other loopholes that could allow rapists to escape punishment if they married their victims, and to treat murders of women as a lesser crime than murders of men,” Rothna Begum, HRW’s Middle East women’s rights researcher, said in a statement

Begum called on other countries in the region, such as Algeria, Bahrain, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, and Syria, to also repeal similar laws. 

Take Action: Sexist Laws Have No Place in 2018

Take Action: Email Now

 
 
 
 
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Palestine joins a handful of other Middle Eastern states that have recently repealed “marry-your-rapist” laws, including Jordan, Lebanon, and Tunisia

The law represents a step in the right direction for a state with high levels of violence against women. According to statistics from UN Women, nearly one in three married women in the West Bank and half of women in the Gaza Strip have experienced domestic violence.  

But Begum cautioned the Palestinian Authority could still do more to stem violence against women. 

“A comprehensive domestic violence law and reforms to personal status laws are essential for demonstrating a commitment to women’s equality and protection,” she said. 

 

Read More: Lebanese Women Dressed in Bloody Bridal Gowns Protest Rape Law

Ending gender violence will require more than just changing laws, other activists say. 

Antonia Kirkland, legal equality program manager at women’s rights organization Equality Now, told HuffPost last year that the key to ending gender violence is “changing...social norms that say a woman or a girl isn’t as valuable as a man or a boy.” 

Global Citizen campaigns on the Global Goals for Sustainable Development, and gender equality is goal number five. You can join us and take action on this issue here

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Music Generation
 

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What we want to do is really simple. We just want to make sure that everyone, whatever their background, gets access to music tuition. That’s the idea.
- Bono

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10/05/2018

My Music Generation Story: Ciarán Somers

My Music Generation Story: Ciarán Somers

Ciarán Somers is a Music Education Partnership Member of Music Generation Carlow and one of the Directors of ‘Reelig’. Originally from Muine Bheag, County Carlow, Ciarán has been instrumental in the development of the annual ‘Music at Mount Leinster’ festival, the fourth edition of which took place in February 2018 at Borris Vocational School.

Tell us about your background in music
I am a traditional musician and I play flutes and Uilleann pipes. I studied music in Waterford IT — BA in music and in DIT —MA in Music Technology.

I have worked as a musician and as a music teacher in Ireland and internationally and I have been teaching music and history at post primary level at Borris Vocational School for the past fifteen years, in which time I have seen the music department grow from a very marginalised subject in a leaky portacabin to a fully integrated and thriving subject area in a busy school.

I am also an associate for the new Junior Cycle for Teachers in the music area. I am looking forward to engaging with the new specification that puts the student at the centre of the learning.

How did you get involved in Music Generation?
I was a member of the original Music Education Partnership that made the application for funding for Carlow back in 2010 and had a significant hand in the planning of post-primary musical activity. ‘Reelig’ subsequently formed as a countywide ensemble for post-primary traditional musicians. Auditions are held each year and the group has performed at a number of local and National events. In 2016, the group entertained the then Taoiseach Enda Kenny and US vice president Joe Biden in collaboration with Music Generation Laois. In addition, for the past two years the group has performed at the Creative Connexions festival near Barcelona in Catalonia.



What does the Music Generation programme look like in your school?
I have been fortunate to work closely with the Music Generation Carlow Coordinator on a number of high quality programmes in the school including fourth year composition projects that saw contemporary composers Linda Buckley and Glenn Austin working with the students on a composition and performance. We have also had a choral programme in the school that have taken part in the end of year Music Generation concerts and in our own school shows and Christmas Carol services. These have enriched the musical landscape of the school and have stimulated further interest in the subject and in Music Generation's work in the county.

In addition, the students from the school and the wider hinterland attend the HUB lessons each week. There is a real buzz about the place on Thursday evenings and you can walk out of your classroom and into a huddle of fiddle players getting in some last minute practice before their lessons. It is honestly transformative for the school and for the community at large.

What do you like most about Music Generation?
Each Music Generation has its own unique and bespoke approach to addressing the gaps in the provision of performance music education. There is no curriculum or overarching template. It is highly rewarding to see children and young people progress into programmes in years three, four and five and especially to see them getting involved in initiatives and ensembles outside of their genres and comfort zones.

Ciaran_Somers_3_560_x_373_560_373_75.jpg

What music are you listening to at the moment?
I play Irish traditional music in two or three ensembles and still enjoy local sessions. I have just completed a collaborative recording project in Brittany, France where I spend a good deal of time and have been hugely influenced. I am listening to a lot of different music from this region at the moment. There is a lot of new music coming out of Brittany.

I also did a small tour in Japan over the Christmas break and will be travelling to Europe over the summer months to perform some of the material connected to that album with the group COEFF 4.

How important is music education in Ireland today?
It is extremely important that all music educators working with young people in Ireland today are advocates for the subject outside of our own immediate circle. Every child should have access to music in their lives.

Music can get sidelined and, sometimes, viewed as a mere window dressing in an educational context. We should all expect more. As a subject music contributes to the intellectual development of the child. Creative thinking and problem solving will be essential for the next generation and within the workforce; these skills can be fostered through music and music education.

What advice would you give to someone thinking about getting involved in Music Generation?
I actively encourage all parents of young children to find out what is happening in their area or school. Music Generation programmes offer a progression route from early years all the way to the end of post-primary.



For more information about programmes and initiatives at Music Generation Carlow contact:
Paula Phelan, Programme Director
Music Generation Carlow, Kilkenny and Carlow Education and Training Board, Athy Road, Carlow

t: 059 9138583
e: pphelan@kcetb.ie
musicgenerationcarlow.ie

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Related Posts

Reelig’s spectacular international performance, complete with beats from dancing feet

REELIG’S SPECTACULAR INTERNATIONAL PERFORMANCE, COMPLETE WITH BEATS FROM DANCING FEET

13 extraordinary young musicians from Carlow represented Music Generation, their county and their country in Sitges last Saturday 28 October as part of the Creative Connexions Festival of Irish and Catalan Culture.

more details →

My Music Generation Story: Karl Burthom

MY MUSIC GENERATION STORY: KARL BURTHOM

The first of the Music Generation tutors to be featured in the series is Karl Burthom, who shares with us his work with the young musicians of Music Generation Sligo and what music means to him as a tutor, performer and composer. 

more details →

My Music Generation Story: Ruairí Callaghan

MY MUSIC GENERATION STORY: RUAIRÍ CALLAGHAN

Next up to tell his Music Generation Story is young musician Ruairí from Sligo. Here Ruairí tells us about his love of the keyboard and why learning music with your family is fun!

more details →

Ireland's National Music Education Programme. A Music Network Initiative, co-funded by U2, The Ireland Funds,The Department of Education and Skills and Local Music Education Partnerships

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© Music Generation DAC. All Rights Reserved. Registered in Ireland No. 491331. Charity Reg. No. CHY 19679.
NCH Building, Earlsfort Terrace, Dublin 2. Telephone: +353 1 4758454

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Older people, disabled people and their unpaid carers are missing important medical appointments because of our broken care system. 

This has gone on for far too long and the Government needs to properly address a system which is failing people everyday. This is not only wasting money for our NHS but putting people through unnecessary suffering. 

Please sign and share this letter to the Minister today: careandsupportalliance.com/letter

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NEWS: 26 Apr 2018

TERMINALLY ILL ‘GRANDDAUGHTER OF CHERNOBYL’ IS SUPPORTED IN THE LOVING COMFORT OF HER FAMILY HOME, FOR HER FINAL JOURNEY IN LIFE

26 Apr 2018

 

 “Excuse my appearance, I’m very tired today,” Lena says as she opens to door to her apartment in Gomel, Belarus.  “I have to wake up every hour at night to make sure Sasha’s oxygen is working.” 

2-year-old Sasha Vlasova has a rare condition that affects the body, but not the brain.  Her prognosis is extremely poor – 95% of stricken children do not live to see 2 years old.  Sasha cannot move or speak, but she is fully alert.  Her eyes follow her mother’s every move and her sharp mind is demonstrated by her ability to communicate with Lena through blinking.

Sasha and her family are supported by Irish charity, Chernobyl Children International (CCI), and their Hospice and Palliative Care Programme.    Through this programme, CCI supports families with children who have profound and often life-limiting disabilities and conditions.  Multi-disciplinary outreach teams deliver medical, therapeutic and personal services in the children’s homes so that they can have high-standard care in the comfort of their loving family homes.  Daily and weekly therapeutic and nursing visits, monitoring and social supports make it possible for these high-risk families to stay together as a unit rather than having the children enter faceless, grim institutions.

“Sasha needs to be watched 24 hours a day.  I’m alone — Sasha’s care is very expensive, so my husband Alexei had to go Russia where he can get paid enough to support Sasha’s care.  CCI sends us physical and massage therapists, it helps her relax and minimizes her discomfort. An Irish company donated breathing tubes, enough to last us for a year.”  Lena continues.

“Without CCI’s help, Sasha would have to go live in an institution — it’s hard, but we are so grateful to have our family together.”

Voluntary CEO of Chernobyl Children International, Adi Roche, explains how Sasha’s situation is due to an inherited legacy from the fallout of the devastating Nuclear accident of 1986;

“We call Sasha the ‘Granddaughter of Chernobyl’ because both of her parents were also children deeply affected by Chernobyl.  Her Mama, Lena, has had her Thyroid gland removed, which was cancerous, and she continues to suffer from further cancers.”

“Sasha is an extraordinary girl, but tragically, she is an example of Chernobyl Lineage…passing the effects of Chernobyl from generation to generation.”

Research carried out by eminent Belarusian scientist Professor Yuri Bandazhevsky has shown that radioactive elements crosses the placental barrier during pregnancy, proving that the fallout from Chernobyl has become a cross-generational problem.  Professor Bandazhevsky was the first scientist in Belarus to establish an institute to study the health of people and in particular children in the aftermath of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster.  Bandazhevsky’s research revealed that even relatively small doses of radioactive particles of radioactive element Caesium 137 can disrupt the functioning of vital systems in the body.

26 April marks the 32 Anniversary of the Chernobyl Disaster as well as the second annual United Nations Chernobyl Disaster Remembrance Day, which was ratified by the United Nations following Adi Roche’s passionate plea to the General Assembly on the 30th Anniversary of the devastating accident at Chernobyl.

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ENVIRONMENT

Climate Change May Be Making Your Seasonal Allergies Worse

Itchy eyes and sneezing? You might be suffering from climate change.

If you’re feeling like allergy season keeps getting worse each year, you’re not wrong. It actually is — and the reason may surprise you: climate change. 

That’s according to a new study from the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (AAAAI), which found that climate change may have exacerbated this year’s “allergy explosion,” NBC reports.

“Some research has suggested that the warming trend that we have in our environment is causing the pollen seasons to start a little bit earlier, and extend a little bit longer," Stanley Fineman, former president of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology, told NBC. "Consequently, patients are suffering because they're exposed to pollen, for longer periods of time.”

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According to the study, allergy season is lasting nearly a full month longer than it did in past years because certain allergens thrive in warmer, wetter climates, NBC reports. 

Rising temperatures have also led to greater amounts of pollen and spores circulating in the air, according to AAAAI’s website

“Climate change, globalization, air pollution, and over-sanitization of the environment in the early years of life are just a few of the causes that, taken together, have introduced new allergens into our environment causing needless suffering," allergist Dr. Clifford Bassett said

sneeze-allergies.jpgImage: Tina Franklin/Flickr

Read More: This ‘Pollution-Free’ City in the Philippines Is the Future We Need

Increased levels of carbon dioxide in the air are particularly dangerous for people who suffer from asthma, and can have a greater effect on “susceptible populations, such as children or the elderly,” according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Global Citizen campaigns on the Global Goals for Sustainable Development, and climate action is goal number 13. You can join us and take action here

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GIRLS & WOMEN

10 Powerful Quotes on Motherhood From Famous Moms

They’re musicians, athletes, activists, and incredible mothers. What can’t these ladies do?

These women are breaking barriers across the board as amazing performers, politicians, athletes, and philanthropists. But there is something they all have in common: motherhood.

While they may spend their days winning Grammys, smashing athletic records, and trying to change the world, one of their most important roles is simply being Mom.

Take Action: Help change the unjust laws that discriminate against girls and women

Take Action: Take The Pledge

 
 
 
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Beyond just being celebrities and mothers, these ladies are Global Citizens who inspire us through their commitment to supporting many amazing causes. They tackle issues like gender equalityeducation, and international development, all while smashing glass ceilings of their own.

From Beyoncé to Melinda Gates, these famous women have spent their lives in the limelight, and they’re using their platforms to speak openly and candidly about what it means to be a mother.

Global Citizen is bringing you 10 powerful quotes on motherhood from famous moms who are changing the world:

1. Beyoncé

"I have so much admiration for women who are mothers, who balance family and work." Cosmopolitan UK interview, April 2011

Beyonce-Festival.jpgImage: Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for Global Citizen

2. Michelle Obama 

"For me, being Mom-in-Chief is, and always will be, job number one." Commencement Address at Tuskegee University, 2015

MichelleObama.pngImage: Official White House Photo by Amanda Lucidon

3. Angelina Jolie

"With my family, I'm trying to raise them to have respect for all people ... and really live a truly global life." Interview with Front Row Features, 2012

Angelina-Jolie-UNHCR-Syria.jpgImage: Ivor Prickett/UNHCR

4. Reese Witherspoon

"No one’s really doing it perfectly. I just think you love your kids with your whole heart, and you do the best you possibly can." Elle Decor article, 2018

 

5. Chrissy Teigen

"I've never had more appreciation for anyone in my entire life until I became a mom." Interview with ET, 2017

 

6. Hillary Clinton

"If you want to know how strong a country's health system is, look at the well-being of its mothers." Global Health Summit, 2012

hillary clinton whiteImage: Photo by Jack Gruber-Pool/Getty Images

7. Serena Williams

"I'm so glad I had a daughter. I want to teach her that there are no limits." Interview with Vogue, February 2018

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8. Pink

"The most important jewels that will ever be wrapped around your neck are the arms of your children." Pink’s Twitter

 

9. Salma Hayek

"A mother is willing and capable of doing anything for her children." Movies Online Interview, 2012

salma-hayek-visits-serian-refugees-b4.jpgImage: Chime for Change: Sebastian Rich

10. Melinda Gates

"If we don't empower women, we don't allow them to unlock the potential of themselves and their children." Girls in Tech article, 2015

melinda gates world bank flickr.jpgImage: Flickr: Simone D. McCourtie / World Bank

 

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MEDIO AMBIENTE

El nuevo presidente de Costa Rica acaba de prohibir los combustibles fósiles

"Tenemos la tarea titánica y hermosa de abolir el uso de combustibles fósiles".

El nuevo presidente de Costa Rica, Carlos Alvarado, anunció el miércoles la prohibición de los combustibles fósiles, estableciendo al pequeño país como un pionero en la lucha mundial contra el cambio climático, según informóTelesur TV.

 

Más de 2,000 personas llenaron la Plaza de la Democracia en la capital San José para presenciar el anuncio histórico. Alvarado, quien oficialmenteasumió el cargo el martes, subrayó su compromiso tras llegar en un autobús impulsado por hidrógeno.

 

"La descarbonización es la gran tarea de nuestra generación y Costa Rica debe ser uno de los primeros países en el mundo en lograrlo, si no el primero", dijo Alvarado durante el evento.

 

"Tenemos la tarea titánica y hermosa de abolir el uso de combustibles fósiles en nuestra economía para dar paso al uso de energías limpias y renovables", agregó.
 

 

Aún no se han dado a conocer detalles específicos del plan, pero Costa Rica se ha comprometido desde hace mucho tiempo a eliminar gradualmente los combustibles fósiles, informa The Independent .

 

Actualmente, el país obtiene más del 99% de su electricidad a partir de energía renovable y el año pasado estuvo 300 días sin usar combustibles fósiles para la electricidad.

 

Hay algunas razones para el éxito de Costa Rica en el desarrollo de fuentes de energía renovables. La geografía del país le permite obtener el 78.26% de su energía de la energía hidroeléctrica, su población relativamente pequeña no requiere mucha energía, y su liderazgo ha reconocido desde hace tiempo la importancia de luchar contra el cambio climático.

 

Años antes de que el acuerdo climático de París obligue a los países a considerar objetivos neutrales en relación con el carbono, Costa Rica había establecido uno en 2011 para 2021 .

 

El nuevo anuncio de Alvarado aumenta el compromiso anterior. Convertirse en carbono neutral y eliminar los combustibles fósiles parecen objetivos similares, pero en última instancia son muy diferentes.

Convertirse en carbono neutral significaría que Costa Rica pueda reducir sus emisiones netas a cero invirtiendo en esfuerzos de eliminación de carbono: plantar árboles, expandir los humedales y desarrollar tecnologías de absorción de carbono que almacenen carbono. Prohibir los combustibles fósiles significa que Costa Rica quiere eliminar las emisiones de carbono por completo, un objetivo mucho más difícil de alcanzar.

Para alcanzarlo, el país tendría que prohibir los automóviles, autobuses y barcos a gasolina, una hazaña que ningún otro país ha logrado.

 

Países como China, India, Francia, el Reino Unido y Noruega han anunciado planes para prohibir la venta de automóviles propulsados por gasolina, pero ningún otro país ha prometido sacar de la carretera a los vehículos que emiten carbono.

 

Aunque el objetivo de Costa Rica es radical en comparación con lo que otros países están haciendo, el acuerdo climático de París , que incluye a todos los países del mundo, excepto EE. UU. , básicamente requiere que las emisiones de carbono se eliminen rápidamente si las temperaturas mundiales suben menos de 2 grados Celsius por arriba de los niveles pre-industriales.

 

La llegada de Alvarado en un autobús impulsado por hidrógeno el miércoles muestra que está ansioso por tomar la iniciativa en este tema. En abril, prometió eliminar el transporte con gasolina y diesel para 2021, el año 200 de la independencia de Costa Rica, según informó Reuters .

 

"Cuando alcancemos los 200 años de vida independiente llevaremos a Costa Rica adelante y celebraremos que hemos eliminado la gasolina y el diesel de nuestro transporte", dijo durante un discurso de victoria, según The Independent.

 

Global Citizen realiza campañas para que los países mitiguen el cambio climático. Puedes tomar medidas al respecto aquí.

 

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CITIZENSHIP

14 Photos of Tragedy and Resilience From Around the World This Week

These powerful images show both struggle and strength.

A daring sea rescue saved the lives of more than 100 refugees and migrants off the coast of Libya. Hawaii residents watched molten lava overtake their cars and homes. And flooding in Kenya killed more than 40 people. Meanwhile, signs of hope popped up in Iraq, India, and Turkey, as people celebrated the return of nice weather. 

Global Citizen is bringing you these photos, and more, from around the world this week.  


Libya-Europe-Migrants-Rescue.jpgImage: Felipe Dana/AP

1. Migrant Crisis: Refugees and migrants were rescued by members of the Spanish NGO Proactiva Open Arms on May 6, after leaving Libya trying to reach European soil aboard an overcrowded rubber boat. In total, 105 refugees and migrants from various countries — including Bangladesh, Egypt, Nigeria, Morocco, Ghana, Pakistan, Sudan, Libya, Eritrea, and Senegal — were rescued north of the Libyan coast.

Hawaii-Volcano-Eruption.jpgImage: US Geological Survey/AP

2. Hawaii Volcano: This photo, provided by the U.S. Geological Survey, shows a lava lake at the summit of Kilauea near Pahoa, Hawaii, on May 6. Hawaii's erupting Kilauea volcano has destroyed homes and forced the evacuations of more than 1,000 people.

 

3. Iraq: An Iraqi boy, who lost his leg in the government offensive to retake the city of Mosul from the Islamic State group, plays football in Arbil, the capital of the Kurdish autonomous region in northern Iraq, during an event sponsored by the Kuwaiti government on May 7.

4. UNESCO Site in Japan: A Japanese tourist wearing an ancient kimono walks past prayer flags at the Kumano Hongu Grand Shrine in Tanabe city, Wakayama prefecture, Japan, on May 6. This year marks the 2,050th year anniversary since the founding of the Shinto shrine. The Kumano Hong Grand Shrine is registered as an UNESCO World Heritage Site.

 

5. Weather in India: Young people in India play in a swimming pool during a hot day in Chennai on May 9.

India-Daily-Life-Water.jpgImage: Anupam Nath/AP

6. India Daily Life: An Indian woman returns home after fetching drinking water on the outskirts of Gauhati, India, on May 9. The UN estimates that more than 1 in 6 people worldwide do not have access to 5-13 gallons of safe freshwater a day to ensure their basic needs for drinking, cooking, and cleaning.

 

7. Flooding in Kenya: The burst bank of the private Patel dam, used for irrigation and fish farming, is seen in Solai, north of Nakuru, Kenya, on May 10. At least 41 people died, 20 of whom were children, police said.

8. Festival in Turkey: A man jumps over a huge fire during the Kakava festival in Edirne, Turkey, on May 5. Kakava is an annual festival of Romani people who live in Turkey that celebrates the arrival of spring. The festival opens with a bonfire followed by various events. At the end of the day, wishes are written on papers and are then released in the river.

Libya-Europe-Migrants.jpgImage: Felipe Dana/AP

9. Migrant Crisis: Kazi Arif, 16, from Bangladesh, rests inside the Astral sailing vessel a day after being rescued by members of the Spanish NGO Proactiva Open Arms as he tried to leave Libya and reach European soil on May 7.

 

10. Volcano Erupts in Hawaii: In this handout photo provided by the US Geological Survey, lava errupts from a new fissure from Luana Street after the eruption of Hawaii's Kilauea volcano on May 5 in the Leilani Estates subdivision near Pahoa, Hawaii. The governor of Hawaii has declared a local state of emergency near the Mount Kilauea volcano after it erupted following a 5.0-magnitude earthquake, forcing the evacuation of nearly 1,700 residents.

11. Children in AfghanistanAfghan boys work at a brick kiln in Herat, Afghanistan, on May 7. Due to the lack of schooling and education facilities in Afghanistan, and the need to earn an income for big families, parents usually send their children to the factories to work. According to reports, some three to five million children, mostly girls, are still unable to attend schools.

12. Crisis in Yemen: A malnourished Yemeni child lies in the lap of his mother at a hospital amid worsening malnutrition, in Sana'a, Yemen, on May 5. According to reports, an estimated 3.3 million children in Yemen are malnourished, with more than 400,000 children under the age of five facing severe malnutrition.

 

13. Safe Homes for Nepali Women: Children of the residents of the Casa Nepal safe house prepare for school on May 8 in Kathmandu, Nepal. Casa Nepal is a safe house that provides shelter and rehabilitation for survivors of gender-based violence located throughout Nepal. Based in Kathmandu, the shelter houses approximately 60 women and their children annually. Presently, 17 government-funded safe houses, formally known as Women's Service Centers, exist countrywide, but unfortunately lack the necessary budget and management for widespread reach. According to the 2011 Nepal Demographic and Health Survey, 1 in 5 women of reproductive age 15-49 have experienced physical violence. 

 

14. Migrant Crisis: Refugees and migrants watch the Sicilian coastline from aboard the MV Aquarius, a rescue vessel chartered by humanitarian organisations SOS Mediterranee and Doctors Without Borders on May 10. Italy's coast guard granted authorization for 105 migrants rescued at sea by Spanish NGO Open Arms and allowed them disembark from the MV Aquarius at the port of Catania, Sicily.

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“What is an LD nurse, what do you do… Oh, so not a proper nurse?”

13 May 2015
diana%20ramsay%20blog.jpgDiana Ramsey

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Diana Ramsey is an Occupational Therapist, specialising in learning disability, and is currently undertaking consultant practitioner training. She writes here about her own personal experiences of the barriers faced by learning disability nurses, and her views on what being a learning disability nurse really means.

“What is an LD nurse, what do you do… Oh, so not a proper nurse?”

These disheartening words were reported last year in a blog by Zoe Wilson, a student learning disability nurse. They were said by hospital staff.  As an Occupational Therapist working with people with a learning disability, I would argue that I’ve never met people who better meet the definition of a ‘proper’ nurse than learning disability nurses.

So what is proper nursing? This has been asked repeatedly in recent years. It was explored particularly in the Francis report in 2013, which revealed the damning failures in care experienced by patients at Mid Staffordshire hospital. As a result of all this, the ‘6 C’s’ were developed to be the benchmark of good nursing practice.  

I’d suggest that these 6 areas - Care, Compassion, competence, communication, courage and commitment - are embodied in the learning disability nursing practice that I see every day.

Care

Care is their core business. Uniquely, they start with the person with a learning disability, their families and carers, rather than a condition or complaint. They empower the individual to get the right health support, through the right channels, in the right way. They encourage health promotion, enabling and empowering people to know what is happening in their body, and in their mind.

Compassion

Compassion,is defined by empathy, respect and dignity, governs a learning disability nurse’s practice. From dropping everything to ensure that a patient has their urgent health care needs met or is given the support they need in the end of their life to advocating that a patient is treated with dignity and is given the reasonable adjustments that they need, compassion drives learning disability nurses.

Competence 

Competence in this context means having the ability to understand a person’s health and social care needs.  A learning disability nurse has both a good overview of all aspects of nursing, and an in-depth understanding of conditions that affect people with a learning disability more than the general population, such as autism or epilepsy.

Communication and Courage

Communication and Courage often come hand in hand. I can’t count the number of times where I have seen learning disability nurses fighting to inform colleagues, and trying to get people to see beyond the learning disability. All too often, professionals just see the learning disability and not the treatable condition.  In this respect they repeatedly tackle these areas day in and day out leading us to the final C, commitment.

Commitment

Commitment is perhaps the biggest challenge to a learning disability nurse’s role.  With pressures on individual nurses, hospitals and services growing every day, remaining committed to advocating for people with a learning disability in order to provide better quality of care and reduce health inequalities is becoming more and more difficult. It is also becoming more and more important. 

I’d say that these ‘6 C’s’  describe both a learning disability nurse and a ‘proper’ nurse and, in fact, are the sign of good professional working for all of us who work with people with a learning disability. To lose focus on these areas would be to lose sight of why we do what we do for the people we support.

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10/05/2018

My Music Generation Story: Ciarán Somers

My Music Generation Story: Ciarán Somers

Ciarán Somers is a Music Education Partnership Member of Music Generation Carlow and one of the Directors of ‘Reelig’. Originally from Muine Bheag, County Carlow, Ciarán has been instrumental in the development of the annual ‘Music at Mount Leinster’ festival, the fourth edition of which took place in February 2018 at Borris Vocational School.

Tell us about your background in music
I am a traditional musician and I play flutes and Uilleann pipes. I studied music in Waterford IT — BA in music and in DIT —MA in Music Technology.

I have worked as a musician and as a music teacher in Ireland and internationally and I have been teaching music and history at post primary level at Borris Vocational School for the past fifteen years, in which time I have seen the music department grow from a very marginalised subject in a leaky portacabin to a fully integrated and thriving subject area in a busy school.

I am also an associate for the new Junior Cycle for Teachers in the music area. I am looking forward to engaging with the new specification that puts the student at the centre of the learning.

How did you get involved in Music Generation?
I was a member of the original Music Education Partnership that made the application for funding for Carlow back in 2010 and had a significant hand in the planning of post-primary musical activity. ‘Reelig’ subsequently formed as a countywide ensemble for post-primary traditional musicians. Auditions are held each year and the group has performed at a number of local and National events. In 2016, the group entertained the then Taoiseach Enda Kenny and US vice president Joe Biden in collaboration with Music Generation Laois. In addition, for the past two years the group has performed at the Creative Connexions festivalnear Barcelona in Catalonia.



What does the Music Generation programme look like in your school?
I have been fortunate to work closely with the Music Generation Carlow Coordinator on a number of high quality programmes in the school including fourth year composition projects that saw contemporary composers Linda Buckley and Glenn Austin working with the students on a composition and performance. We have also had a choral programme in the school that have taken part in the end of year Music Generation concerts and in our own school shows and Christmas Carol services. These have enriched the musical landscape of the school and have stimulated further interest in the subject and in Music Generation's work in the county.

In addition, the students from the school and the wider hinterland attend the HUB lessons each week. There is a real buzz about the place on Thursday evenings and you can walk out of your classroom and into a huddle of fiddle players getting in some last minute practice before their lessons. It is honestly transformative for the school and for the community at large.

What do you like most about Music Generation?
Each Music Generation has its own unique and bespoke approach to addressing the gaps in the provision of performance music education. There is no curriculum or overarching template. It is highly rewarding to see children and young people progress into programmes in years three, four and five and especially to see them getting involved in initiatives and ensembles outside of their genres and comfort zones.

Ciaran_Somers_3_560_x_373_560_373_75.jpg

What music are you listening to at the moment?
I play Irish traditional music in two or three ensembles and still enjoy local sessions. I have just completed a collaborative recording project in Brittany, France where I spend a good deal of time and have been hugely influenced. I am listening to a lot of different music from this region at the moment. There is a lot of new music coming out of Brittany.

I also did a small tour in Japan over the Christmas break and will be travelling to Europe over the summer months to perform some of the material connected to that album with the group COEFF 4.

How important is music education in Ireland today?
It is extremely important that all music educators working with young people in Ireland today are advocates for the subject outside of our own immediate circle. Every child should have access to music in their lives.

Music can get sidelined and, sometimes, viewed as a mere window dressing in an educational context. We should all expect more. As a subject music contributes to the intellectual development of the child. Creative thinking and problem solving will be essential for the next generation and within the workforce; these skills can be fostered through music and music education.

What advice would you give to someone thinking about getting involved in Music Generation?
I actively encourage all parents of young children to find out what is happening in their area or school. Music Generation programmes offer a progression route from early years all the way to the end of post-primary.



For more information about programmes and initiatives at Music Generation Carlow contact:
Paula Phelan, Programme Director
Music Generation Carlow, Kilkenny and Carlow Education and Training Board, Athy Road, Carlow

t: 059 9138583
e: pphelan@kcetb.ie
musicgenerationcarlow.ie

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How learning new skills helped Henriette tripple her villages earnings: “In the past, there were a lot of bad practices like poison fishing, breaking the reef to find octopus or sea cucumbers, and we’ve seen the resources decreasing. It’s important for me to be involved in the management of the fisheries, as it’s a resource that I want to be there for my children”

La imagen puede contener: 1 persona, sonriendo, primer plano

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GIRLS AND WOMEN

This Mother’s Day, help every mother survive childbirth

May 11 2018 | By: GUEST BLOGGER

JOIN

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By Ash Rogers, Executive Director, Lwala Community Alliance

On Mother’s Day, we honor the women who have nurtured us, guided us, and helped us gain the skills to thrive. In recent years, as I became a mother myself, it has also turned into a period of reflection, as I ponder the bond with other women who have shared in the miracle of creating life. I feel a deeper sense of solidarity with my own mother—and with women around the world whose experience giving birth can be challenging, and sometimes fatal.

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Ash Rogers with mothers and babies in Nairobi, Kenya

This was never more evident to me than when my story as a mother began two and a half years ago. I gave birth to my son, Wesley, in a pristine hospital in Nairobi, Kenya with my husband by my side. The doctor placed Wesley on my chest and my husband leaned in close so we could look at him together. Within seconds, the room became a buzz of frantic activity— the nurse briskly handed my baby to my husband, and asked him to step back. I was suddenly flooded with a pain more acute than anything I had even experienced during labor.

I became cold and lost the ability to move; I began to feel less and less present in the room, as if I were fading away. I remember looking up from the hospital bed at my sweet new baby and my loving husband and longing to be able to stay with them, even for just a little bit longer. I didn’t want to leave. I didn’t want to miss what was sure to be the most precious moments of my life.

As profound and terrifying as this experience was for me, it is not uncommon. In fact, the condition I was suffering from, postpartum hemorrhage, is the leading cause of maternal death in most of the world. Each day, more than 800 mothers die in childbirth. 99% of these deaths occur in developing countries and 66% occur in Sub-Saharan Africa. It is an intolerable fact that mothers are significantly more likely to die, simply because of where they are from and/or the color of their skin.

Because I delivered with skilled clinicians, in a well-equipped health facility, I lived. Just hours later, after several interventions and a blood transfusion, I woke up, fed my beautiful baby boy for the first time, and continued the rewarding and tumultuous journey of motherhood.

The world has the technology to keep mothers alive: approximately 88% to 98% of all maternal deaths are preventable. The challenge is extending that technology to rural communities and building equitable health systems that treat all women with dignity.

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The Lwala Community Alliance family

At Lwala Community Alliance, we believe that all women deserve to survive childbirth. We were founded by a group of community members in rural Kenya who envisioned a health system that could reach them, and then built one. They donated community land and resources to build their own health center and created a cadre of community health workers from amongst the traditional midwives who had been serving them for generations. Armed with new training, a mobile application, and support from a nurse, these community health workers bridge the gap between rural mothers and an intimidating health system. Lwala community health workers accompany mothers through pregnancy, ensure they deliver in a safe health facility, and follow-up regularly in those first precious days and years of a baby’s life.

Through this approach, Lwala has increased the skilled delivery rate to 97% and reduced under-5 mortality by 64% of the regional average. Now, we are in an all-out effort to expand our work and save more lives.

In fact, this year Lwala launched an initiative specifically aimed at postpartum hemorrhage. We identified the non-pneumatic anti-shock garment, a technology developed and tested by the University of California – San Francisco (UCSF), but not in active use in Kenya. This device essentially acts as a complete-body tourniquet, preserving blood flow to the vital organs of a hemorrhaging woman, and buying precious time for her to be transferred to a facility capable of providing surgical care. In partnership with UCSF, we have begun training facilities across a population of 1 million on the use of this life-saving garment.

Only days after our first training, Lwala received its first postpartum hemorrhage case. Achieng sustained a severe cervical tear while delivering her fifth child, and needed to be transferred to a facility that would be able to treat her. Thanks to the garment, clinicians had enough time to transport her to a surgical facility, saving her life, and ensuring that she would have the opportunity to celebrate another Mother’s Day.

This device is a low-cost, scalable solution that has the ability to save thousands of lives throughout Kenya. The Kenyan Ministry of Health is watching this pilot closely, and we hope it is a model that can be scaled nationally.

This Mother’s Day, as we honor the mothers closest to us with handwritten cards, flowers, and social media posts, let us also honor motherhood as a whole. Let us honor mothers across geography and race, by fighting for their dignity and equity.

*Names have been changed for privacy

 

ONE welcomes the contributions of guest bloggers but does not necessarily endorse the views, programs, or organizations highlighted.

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CULTURE

Made-In-Kenya: How these running shoes are going to change lives

8 June 2016 10:51AM UTC | By: ROBYN DETORO

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Kenya is known around the world for producing some of the planet’s greatest running champions. Its reputation for running has sparked an interest in runners from around the world, who flock to the high altitude training regions in Kenya just to breathe the same air as their sporting heroes. 

It was the global attention Kenya attracted that led Navalayo (Nava) Osembo-Ombati and Nairobi based ONE member, Weldon Kennedy, to design a running shoe that will not only be made in Kenya but create a sustainable income for the local community. Weldon said, “There is no other place in the world that you can make a Kenyan-made running shoe.

Weldon Kennedy and Nava Osembo-Ombati - Enda Co-Founders.

Weldon Kennedy and Nava Osembo-Ombati – Enda Co-Founders.

We love that Nava and Weldon want to use their company, Enda — which means “go” in Swahili — to initiate social change and boost the local economy through empowerment and ownership. They — along with development experts and the government of Kenya — strongly believe the economy will benefit from behaviours guided by the “buy something from Kenya rather than give something to Kenya” principle.

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Runner Joan Cherop overlooking Kenya’s valleys.

Nava, who was born and raised in Kenya, is familiar with the conditions of poverty and sexism that affect local communities and can hamper individuals from achieving their full potential. “I’m a product of education. Luck has come, but education has given me lots of opportunities,” Nava said. She graduated from the London School of Economics and is qualified as a lawyer AND an accountant! It is these academic and career achievements that have made Nava stand out as a leader and role model to young girls – some of whom approach her regularly for advice on how they too can succeed in Kenya’s patriarchal society.

It is essential to Nava that Enda embodies a strong sense of social responsibility and empowers vulnerable individuals by providing them with equal opportunities to earn sustainable livelihoods and achieve security. The shoe company plans to employ men and women to do the same jobs, and also plans to operate a childcare facility on site so that single parents can earn an income while knowing their babies are in safe hands.Kickstartershoot (3 of 74)

Enda is also focused on ways they can share their success with the Kenyan community outside of employment. Nava and Weldon will be bookmarking a percentage of their profits for distribution to local community projects that are excelling at what they do. It can be difficult to secure funding for small development projects, so the co-founders of Enda want to make sure that projects seeing good results in local communities can continue to deliver.

Runners Joan Cherop (right) and Justin Lagat (left) in Kenya.

Runners Joan Cherop (right) and Justin Lagat (left) in Kenya.

In addition to empowering individuals and providing stable, sustainable livelihoods, Enda is also on a mission to change the world’s perception of Kenya. Nava said, “Kenya is a country of innovation, creativity, and of people making change.”

Nava and Welden believe Kenya’s narrative can be rewritten – that there is room to be known as a source of great quality runners AND great quality products.

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This Texas-based social enterprise is helping empower Kenyan moms
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TRADE AND INVESTMENT

This Texas-based social enterprise is helping empower Kenyan moms

April 5 2018 | By: GUEST BLOGGER

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By Zane Wilemon, Ubuntu co-founder. Read a Forbes story on Zane here.

Fifteen years ago, just after graduating from university, I bought a one-way ticket to Kenya. I became friends with a pastor named Jeremiah Kuria, and together we started a nonprofit with the hope of empowering marginalized mothers who have children with special needs.

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Today, we’re a blended social enterprise with our own Kenyan fashion company,Ubuntu Made. Our first big break came when I pretended to be a cupcake guy at a Whole Foods Market board meeting in order to get a meeting with a higher level executive. It worked, and the next thing we knew, our little nonprofit was fulfilling massive orders overnight.

This week marks the next giant leap as we launch the world’s first fully-customizable espadrille from Africa, the Afridrille.

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The Afridrille shoe is designed in Austin, Texas, and handmade in Maai Mahiu, Kenya. What makes it unique is that each pair is custom-made to fit the wearer’s personal style. With nearly 22,000 possibilities, nothing about the Afridrille is “off the rack.” Each customer creates their own unique shoe by selecting from 10 colors of canvas, 13 silk-screened print designs, 12 colors of ink for the print, and 13 inner linings in Kenyan kanga prints.

Each shoe is sourced with natural, local materials with an emphasis on comfort and durability and is hand-sewn by our Kenyan artisans, the Maker Mums. Our Maker Mums are mothers to children with special needs who are enrolled in our foundation’s special needs program, which provides access to essential services and promotes social inclusion for our Ubuntu Kids.

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I describe our partnership with the Maker Mums as not a handout, but a handshake: The mothers are businesswomen who directly benefit from every pair of shoes sold — because they’re the ones making them. Every exchange should be a chance to connect and empower. That’s what our shoes represent.

“I am now the proud owner of my family’s home, my finances are stable, and my living standards have greatly improved, “says Monicah, a Maker Mum since 2008. “I am on a savings plan and can access financial credit, something which seemed out of reach in the past.”

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The entrepreneurial Kenyan women working with us earn above-market wages and invest in their families with the income they receive. Because of that, 100 percent of them have health insurance and can afford to send their children to school, and more than half of them are now homeowners. On top of that, 100 percent of proceeds from every Afridrille purchase goes directly towards the pediatric education and medical care of the children enrolled in our foundation programs.

“We see The Afridrille shoe as one key step into cracking the code on sustainability for communities across Africa,” explains Gladys Macharia, Ubuntu’s Head of Design. “People need jobs and not just any job, but well paid, meaningful jobs that provide people with the basic infrastructure in their lives and the lives of their families so that they can lift themselves, as empowered voices, out of poverty.”

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But how do you scale growth opportunities like this to a truly sustainable level that provides lasting employment on a global scale? In trying to figure that out, Jeff Beaver, co-founder and Chief Product Officer at Zazzle, and I forged a strong friendship over the shared vision around the power of the makers. What started as conversations quickly led to two trips to Kenya, an exploratory adventure to shoe factories in Ethiopia, and full-scale production of Africa’s first fully customizable shoe.

“At Zazzle, we’re thrilled to extend our platform and technologies to Makers who craft products with soul, made from the heart,” says Jeff. “And there’s perhaps no better example of this than the Ubuntu Maker Mums. Through our partnership with Ubuntu, we’ve learned that providing economic opportunity is exponentially more impactful, and sustainable, than handouts or charity.”

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“These Afridrilles are more than just awesome shoes, they are a celebration of the human spirit and every single pair empowers these Mums, their special needs kids, and their larger community. What’s better than that?”

ONE welcomes the contributions of guest bloggers but does not necessarily endorse the views, programs, or organizations highlighted.

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April 5 2018

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