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The Action Thread Part Two

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Yesterday we hosted the first of our Familly Support Days for children and families on our Community Care and Hospice Programme! 1f388.png?1f389.png?

This programme helps treat and deliver therapeutic services to terminally and chronically ill children across Belarus. These special days gives the children and families the opportunity to meet each other, develop a support network, exchange ideas and enjoy some time out from their everyday lives.

CCI’s multi-disciplinary teams conduct home-based services specifically designed for each family and are assigned a palliative care team including therapists, a nurse, a psychologist and a social worker. The team makes home visits to supervise the child’s care, provides medication and supplies at no cost to the families and evaluates the social and emotional needs of all family members. The programme helps almost 50 families between Minsk and Gomel in Belarus.

To learn more about our Programmes, visit
www.chernobyl-international.com

La imagen puede contener: 6 personas, personas sonriendo

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CITIZENSHIP

Giant Balloons Are Bringing Internet Access to Rural Kenya

Google’s sister company Loon is behind the initiative.


Why Global Citizens Should Care
The internet isn't just selfies and Snapchat, it’s about education access, health care, training, business development, the sharing of new ideas, and spreading technologies that have the power to alleviate suffering the world over. That’s why initiatives like this are so important, and why universal, affordable internet access is part of the UN’s Global Goals. You can join us by taking action in support of the goals here 

A network of enormous balloons will be bringing internet access to some of Kenya’s most inaccessible regions from as early as next year. 

Google’s sister company Loon — owned by Google parent company Alphabet Inc. — is behind the initiative, partnering with Telkom Kenya to deliver 4G coverage to the country’s rural areas. 

“Loon’s mission is to connect people everywhere by inventing and integrating audacious technologies,” said Alastair Westgarth, the chief executive of Loon, marking its first commercial deal in Africa. 

Take action: Tell Leaders How Important Education in Emergencies Is

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The fleet of balloons — each reportedly about the size of a tennis court — will dangle antennae, and these will relay internet signals transmitted from the ground. 

Loon has assured that the fleet will be floating far out of range of air traffic, storms, and wildlife, at a height of around 20 kilometers (60,000 feet or 12.4 miles) above sea level. Each balloon can reportedly provide coverage to an area of about 5,000 square kilometers. 

US telecom operators first used the technology behind the balloons in the wake of a hurricane in Puerto Rico last year, according to Reuters , to provide internet to around 250,000 people. 

Read more: Women Worldwide Are Being Left Behind as Technology Advances

The balloons will be powered by a solar panel, made from polyethylene, and will be filled with helium. They’ll also designed to float above the country for months at a time without having to land. 

While Kenya’s major cities and towns already have internet, rural areas are much harder to reach. 

But having internet access could be life-changing for those reached by the balloons’ connection. As of 2016, more than 4 billion people in the world — mostly in developing countries — didn’t have access to the internet. 

And yet, advantages of an internet connection include far more than social media (which also has a lot of advantages in itself, such as sharing new ideas and providing a platform for voicing and combatting injustice). The internet helps people access financial services, as well as health and education facilities; it provides a greater platform for the development of small businesses or startups; and helps people communicate with family and friends, among many other things.

Read more: Canada Will Soon Provide Low-Income Families With $10-Per-Month Internet

It also opens up a whole world of opportunity for apps to make people’s lives easier and safer — health workers have been able to track patients with Ebola to reduce the spread of the virus, for example. Nurses and health professionals can be trained more easily and more cheaply, and farmers aremore easily able to manage their supply chains. 

In fact, universal, affordable internet access is part of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals, and the ONE Campaign, and NGO, has a wholecampaign dedicated to ensuring everyone can access the internet — particularly women and girls. 

But the sheer size of Kenya’s rural areas has so far made internet access almost impossible, with fiber cables and mobile masts unable to cope with the large distances involved. 

Read more: New Tech Will Change the World, But Not Without Risks, UN Report Says

Experts have, however, raised some concerns about the balloon initiative leading to a monopoly on communications in rural areas that could leave people vulnerable to price hikes or changes in business strategy. 

“Once these networks are in place, and dependency has reached a critical level, users are at the mercy of changes in business strategy, pricing, terms and conditions, and so on,” Ken Banks, an expert in African connectivity and head of social impact at Yoti, told the BBC 

“This would perhaps be less of a problem if there’s more than one provider — you can simply switch networks — but if Loon and Telkom have monopolies in these areas, that could be a ticking time bomb.” 

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CITIZENSHIP

12 Photos of Celebration and Struggle From Around the World This Week

These powerful images capture everything from World Cup celebrations to devastating wildfires.


Why Global Citizens Should Care
These powerful images from around the world range from celebrations of the late Nelson Mandela, who dedicated his life to fighting for equality, to the impact of extreme weather events, worsened by climate change, on some of the world's most vulnerable populations. You can join us here to take action on these issues and more.

This week has been one of celebration in many places around the world.

Across South Africa and the globe, people honored the late Nelson Mandela, who would have turned 100 on July 18. In his highest-profile speech since leaving office in January 2017, Barack Obama remembered the legendary anti-apartheid leader and urged the crowd to follow in his footsteps and continue the fight for equality everywhere.

Take Action: Be the Generation to End Extreme Poverty

 

Take Action: Sign Now

 
 
 
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United StatesUnited KingdomGermanyCanadaAustraliaAfghanistanÅland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBruneiBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCabo VerdeCambodiaCameroonCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo (the Democratic Republic of the)Cook IslandsCosta RicaCôte d'IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands  [Malvinas]Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambia (The)GeorgiaGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuamGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and McDonald IslandsHoly See  [Vatican City State]HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIranIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKuwaitKyrgyzstanLaosLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedoniaMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMicronesia (the Federated States of)MoldoviaMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorth KoreaNorthern Mariana IslandsNorwayOmanPakistanPalauPalestine, State ofPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarRéunionRomaniaRussiaRwandaSaint BarthélemySaint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth KoreaSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyriaTaiwanTajikistanTanzaniaThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited States Minor Outlying IslandsUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuelaVietnamVirgin Islands (British)Virgin Islands (U.S.)Wallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabwe

 

 

 

France, too, had reason to celebrate this week after winning its first FIFA World Cup in 20 years. And in Thailand, people rejoiced for a very different reason, as the trapped young boys and their coach were returned to saftey after spending two weeks trapped by floods in a cave.

Yet, while scenes of joy were scene throughout much of the world this week, people in both the Philippines and Bangladesh are struggling to stay safe and dry as the rainy season carries on. And the ongoing conflict in Syria — now in its seventh year of civil war — continues to displace people from their homes.

These are this week's most powerful photos of celebration, struggle, and everyday life.


 

1. Mandela Day: Members of the Maharishi Institute Choir perform at the global Walk Together initiative event by Nelson Mandela's group The Elders to celebrate Nelson Mandela's 100th Anniversary at Constitution Hill in Johannesburg on July 18. South Africa celebrated 100 years since Nelson Mandela's birth, which is marked annually around the world as Mandela Day, and the Nelson Mandela Foundation called for people to "take action and inspire change" in his name on the centenary year.

California-Wildfires-Summer-Heat.jpgImage: Noah Berger/AP

2. California Wildfires: A plane battling the Ferguson Fire passes the setting sun in unincorporated Mariposa County in California, near Yosemite National Park on July 15. As of this morning, the wildfire has burned 22,892 acres of Mariposa County and is only 7% contained. Rising average temperatures have led to forests in California drying out, increasing the risk of fires. There are more than 100 million dead trees in California alone, which creates a tinderbox for fires to spark and grow from. 

 

3. Syrian Conflict: Evacuated Syrian boys from the area of Fuaa and Kafraya in the Idlib province look out of a broken bus window as it passes the al-Eis crossing south of Aleppo during the evacuation of several thousand residents from the two pro-regime towns in northern Syria on July 19. 

World-Cup-Soccer-Around-The-World.jpgImage: Anupam Nath/AP

4. World Cup: Indian children at a school hostel watch on laptops the World Cup soccer final match between France and Croatia on the outskirts of Gauhati, India, on July 15. 

France-World-Cup-Soccer.jpgImage: Thibault Camus/AP

5. France World Cup Victory: The Arc de Triomphe is illuminated with the colors of the French national flag and by fireworks set off by French soccer fans celebrating France's World Cup victory over Croatia, in Paris, France, July 15. France won the final 4-2. The inscription in French reads: Proud to be blue. After the victory, Kylian Mbappé, a 19-year-old powerhouse who scored four goals this tournament, announced that he will donate all of his earnings from the tournament to kids with disabilities. The athlete, who was born in Paris, is the son of immigrants – yet another reminder of how migration and diversity can make a country great. 

Obama-Mandela-100-Years-South-Africa.jpgImage: Themba Hadebe/AP

6. Nelson Mandela Centenary: Former US President Barack Obama delivers his speech at the 16th Annual Nelson Mandela Lecture at the Wanderers Stadium in Johannesburg, South Africa, on July 17. In his highest-profile speech since leaving office, Obama urged people around the world to respect human rights and other values under threat in an address marking the 100th anniversary of anti-apartheid leader Nelson Mandela's birth.

 

7. Summer Weather: A child plays in the waterfall at Yards Park amid warm summer temperatures in Washington, DC, on July 19.

 

8. Rohingya Refugees: A Rohingya refugee girl makes her way as rain falls at Jamtoli refugee camp in Ukhia on July 20.

Thailand-Cave-Boys-Soccer.jpgImage: Chiang Rai Public Relations Department/AP

9. Thailand Cave Rescue: In this July 18 photo provided by Chiang Rai Public Relations Department, members of the rescued soccer team show their skills before a press conference regarding their experience being trapped in the cave in Chiang Rai, northern Thailand. One of the boys, Adun Sam-On, a 14-year-old top student and star athlete who speaks four languages, was able to take a leadership role inside of the cave by translating for British divers. Staff at his school say it is not the first time the boy has had to overcome significant challenges, having escaped ethnic conflict in Myanmar to live alone as a refugee without a home or family in Thailand. 

 

10. France Agriculture: An aerial view shows haystacks in a field in Saint-Philbert-sur-Risle, northern France, on July 19. 

 

11. Flooding in the Philippines: A woman looks out of her home at floodwaters as the Marikina river swelled after continuous rain caused by Tropical Storm Inday (Ampil) in Manila on July 20.

 

12. Protests in Peru: Demonstrators take part in a march against corruption in Lima on July 19. Outraged Peruvians marched on Thursday all over the country to protest against corruption, following the scandal of audios of judges negotiating sentences that already caused the resignation of the president of the Supreme Court and the Minister of Justice. 

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6 DE JULIO DE 2018

 

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MEDIO AMBIENTE

El Mar Báltico ahora tiene una zona muerta del tamaño de Irlanda

A pesar de 10 años de esfuerzos, los niveles de oxígeno en el Báltico son los peores en 1.500 años.

Por qué los Global Citizens deberían preocuparse
La actividad humana y el calentamiento global provocado por el hombre están amenazando la vida marina en el Mar Báltico, obstaculizando el progreso en el logro de los Objetivos Globales, incluida la protección de la vida bajo el agua y la lucha contra el cambio climático. Puedes unirte a nosotros aquí tomando medidas para ayudar a proteger nuestros océanos y combatir el cambio climático.

Los humanos literalmente están matando el planeta.

 

Los científicos dicen que los niveles de oxígeno en el Mar Báltico son los más bajos registrados en los últimos 1.500 años y creen que estas " zonas muertas " encontradas, han sido causadas por los residuos agrícolas y urbanos.

 

A pesar de que los países de la costa báltica han hecho los mejores esfuerzos para ayudar al mar a recuperarse en los últimos 10 años, la "zona muerta" en el Mar Báltico ahora cubre un área de alrededor de 70,000 kilómetros cuadrados, aproximadamente del tamaño de Irlanda, según informó The Guardian .

 

El nitrógeno y el fósforo expulsado de las zonas agrícolas, los nutrientes químicos esenciales para las plantas, se abren camino en los cuerpos de agua donde causan un rápido crecimiento de algas. Las algas eventualmente mueren, se hunden y se descomponen. A medida que las algas se descomponen, consumen oxígeno en el agua, sofocando a otras criaturas marinas o incitándolas a huir del área, lo que genera "zonas muertas".

 

Los bajos niveles de oxígeno en el agua también afectan a las poblaciones de peces, y por lo tanto a los medios de subsistencia de los pescadores, y pueden promover, además, el crecimiento de bacterias tóxicas.

 

Esta no es la primera vez que los niveles de oxígeno en el Báltico han bajado.En su estudio recientemente publicado, el equipo de investigación finlandés y alemán descubrió que la vida marina en el mar Báltico ha ido desapareciendo en los últimos 100 años, pero que el estrés actual sobre el mar "no tiene precedentes" .

La actividad agrícola y las aguas residuales no son las únicas formas en que los humanos están dañando el mar. Los científicos le dijeron a The Guardianque el calentamiento global, en gran medida impulsado por humanos , "probablemente retrasa el proceso de recuperación, porque el oxígeno se disuelve menos fácilmente en agua caliente".

 

In 2015, NASA captured this massive bloom in the Baltic Sea. Large blooms can cause a "dead zone" where other organisms can't live.

 
 

 

Aunque los gobiernos de la región báltica ya están trabajando en un plan de recuperación, Sami Jokinen y Tom Jilbert, coautores del estudio, dicen que los humanos tienen un papel que desempeñar en la curación del mar.

 

"Una de las principales cosas que hacer en el futuro puede ser reducir la proporción de carne en la dieta", dijeron. "La agricultura ganadera genera una mayor pérdida de nutrientes por kilogramo de alimentos producidos" y esos nutrientes pueden llegar al agua donde alteran el ecosistema.

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'I was a child carer - it made me who I am today'

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Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett and her brother

From the age of 12, writer Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett helped look after her severely autistic brother. Like hundreds of thousands of other young carers, she took on major responsibilities early - but says it made her the person she is today.

Being a young carer makes you different from your friends. This is one of the first things that you learn. You visit their houses after school and notice how different their lives are from yours. Their houses seem tidy, quiet and peaceful.

Mine was the opposite.

My younger brother is severely autistic. He was diagnosed when he was four, but we knew there were issues before then.

Even as a baby, he wouldn't stay still when you tried to hold him - my mum, Anna, said he was like an octopus wriggling in her arms.

As a toddler, he was hyperactive. He tore through our house, leaving chaos in his wake. He would climb furniture and banisters, empty cereal packets and cartons of orange juice on the floor, scribble on the walls.

Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett's brother

He didn't sleep. He didn't talk. We knew our lives would be changed by his autism, but we didn't realise by how much.

I am six years older than my brother, and cared for him along with my mum until I left home in North Wales at 18 (my parents separated when I was 12).

It's been estimated that 700,000 children and young people across the UK, some as young as five years old, are caring for family members. But the true number is likely to be much higher, as many are hidden from view.

I know what an isolating and difficult experience it can be - growing up, I had no idea there were so many other children out there in similar positions, caring for ill and disabled relatives.

When you are a carer, it can be hard to relate to your friends, with their "normal" lives.

You have responsibilities. You have to grow up very quickly. You can't muck about and be so carefree.

Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett and her brother

I certainly didn't misbehave - I felt that my mum, who did the lion's share of the caring, had enough to deal with, without me being naughty as well. My brother barely slept and she was exhausted most of the time from getting up more than four times a night. I would care for him while she snatched an hour of sleep and, as I got older, for much longer stretches so that she could go to work or spend the evening with her then partner.

I did have moments where I felt quite separate from my classmates, who were still having their dinner cooked for them when I was preparing meals from scratch. On the other hand, being able to cook stood me in good stead in the long run, as did many other skills and traits I learned from being a carer - responsibility, compassion, empathy, selflessness, multi-tasking, patience and generosity.

A sense of humour was a must, especially when it came to toilet trouble. Mum and I cleared up enough poo for a lifetime (this may be why, at 31, I am still not sure how I feel about having children).

It taught me basic plumbing - give me some string and a coat-hanger and I can fix a broken toilet - but also how to laugh when you're up the proverbial creek. You had to, because otherwise you would cry. Then again, we did lots of that too.

We had two floods and a fire, and endless weird and embarrassing moments. People loved my brother - he was a very cute child with a huge goofy smile and big blue eyes, but his behaviour was - how can I put it? - unpredictable.

Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett's brother

Sometimes when we were out and about he would take his clothes off and run around while we chased after him, waving his trousers desperately like a flag. He was always falling into lakes and rivers, or reaching into people's bags of chips and plucking them out.

He had no sense of fear so you had to be hyper-alert. He once ran into a field with a bull, which was terrifying. Thankfully we got him out in time.

He also had tantrums in public and people would stare and make comments. I always confronted them when this happened - being a young carer made me quite feisty. I had a keen sense of injustice from a young age and that has translated into my journalism, particularly when it comes to the hardship and discrimination that disabled people often face.

Schoolwork was difficult as sleep was disrupted, and the house was really noisy all the time.

I learned how to concentrate even if all around me was total chaos. I developed a love of reading and tore through several library books a week. In a way, being a carer is what made me a writer. When things were difficult, I needed a way to escape, and reading provided that, but it also made me interested in people.

Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett and her brother

You learn so much about humanity when you are looking after someone vulnerable and you need empathy, a vital skill when it comes to creating your own characters.

Teachers didn't always understand. I'm not surprised that Carers Trust Wales have found that many children who are carers are not known to local authorities . Adults often don't think to ask, or when you try to explain why your homework is late, or indeed why you are, they will just say that you are making excuses. I'll never forget the horrible reaction of an after-school drama teacher who refused to accept that I had missed a rehearsal because I had to look after my brother.

Nevertheless, for every nasty person there were many more kind ones.

I had a couple of close friends who lived nearby - Hannah and Kate - who have always been there, and would keep me company when I was on my own with my brother at home because mum had to work or pick up a prescription. (Hannah is now a mental health nurse and says her experience looking after my brother helped inspire her to pursue that career.)

As I grew older, I opened up to more friends about my home situation. They were all really supportive, treating my situation as though it were no different from anyone else's. Sometimes people act as though they are uncomfortable around my brother because of his strange seeming mannerisms and noises, but they never did. They helped me realise that there is no such thing as a normal family.

My mum trusted me, and in many ways that worked out quite well - as long as I made sure my brother was OK, I could have people over and she could benefit from finally having a bit of a social life. Often friends would help put him to bed, and I remember being particularly touched to find my friend Sam reading him a bedtime story.

Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett's brother

Leaving home was hard. By that time, my brother was in a special school, staying overnight during the week and coming home at the weekends. Yet I still felt like I was abandoning my mum, who was finding it increasingly difficult to cope.

My brother had grown very big and strong and she couldn't control him any more. He had also developed epilepsy, which needed careful management and supervision, and his obsessive-compulsive disorder meant that taking him outside was more and more difficult. She became very isolated.

I missed them both terribly, because although things had been hard at times, we were a family.

I cried for two weeks, and I think the sadness and the exhaustion are with me even now.

Although I have a good job and a happy life, there are some days where I still feel very low.

When my brother was nearly 15, things became so difficult for my mum that he went into school full-time. He is now 25 and lives in a care home. He is very happy there - his carers are brilliant, and I see him as much as I can for walks on the beach and trips out for lunch.

Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett and her brother

I am grateful for how lucky we are - not everyone receives such good government support. If the help hadn't been there, I might never have left home. I certainly wouldn't have gone to university or have established a career as a writer.

Whenever I meet young carers, I want to give them a hug and tell them that I know what they are going through.

They should be given more support - both practical and respite care. I certainly would have benefited from some counselling.

No child's education should suffer because they are looking after a family member, they should be encouraged by adults, and given the help they need.

Sometimes I am asked if I wish my brother had been "normal". It's a strange question, because it's essentially asking me if I wish he were a different person.

Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett's brother

Obviously, I wish that he did not have to suffer, which he does as a result of his epilepsy and anxiety. But I love my brother for who he is, and looking after him has been the defining experience of my life.

Caring has made me strong as well as sensitive. It has made me a kinder person and given me the motivation to fight for social justice. But most of all I feel lucky to have felt such profound, unconditional love for my little brother. That has been a gift.

Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett is the author of The Tyranny of Lost Things. Follow her on Twitter @rhiannonlucyc.

All photos supplied by Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett and family.

A selection of your comments:

I was a child carer for my severely autistic brother who is 18 months younger than myself. I never really thought that I was until I read this article but it really spoke to me (especially the random sprinting and the poo!). I love my brother and there is no question he made me a better person but he has had a huge impact on my family.

Jessica Sutcliffe, London

Wow. Wow. Wow. Rhiannon's words here could almost be my own - word for word. The big difference is that I was a boy and it was my sister and as a male you do not have the close emotional support Rhiannon received from her friends. My friends were great but not in any way could they understand how I had to care for my younger sister - in every way. We also grew up in a very closed family in a rural area which did not help. While I wish I had someone to help direct me then, I have done OK. I am now the guardian for my sister. As we live in a rural area she unfortunately now lives 3.5 to four hours by car from home but like Rhiannon with her brother, I am very, very grateful that she now receives the care she deserves and it allows my other sister and I to lead "normal" lives.

Anon

Reading Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett's story was unnerving because she was writing about my childhood. My brother is severely autistic, six years younger than me and my parents separated when I was nine years old. Before reading her story, I had not thought of myself as a "carer" though. I had thought of that title as being my mum's. I felt a responsibility towards my mum and felt terrible to be abandoning her (and him). My brother is now in full-time care, visiting my mum some weekends. We are very lucky in so many ways, but I wonder if people realise that it is not just the physical exercise of caring for your loved one, but the mental and emotional burden. Is he happy, is he safe? Are the staff at his home treating him well and being kind to him?

Rachel Cook, London

Caring from a young age absolutely shaped who I am now! It's difficult, but looking around I am constantly reminded how lucky I am, in many ways I'm stronger than my peers and it's helped me become successful. You can't resent an experience that builds you, helps you become who you are and be happy as you are. Good luck to anyone who is experiencing this now, it does get better, honestly, also you're not alone!

Cara Hunter, Bedworth

This reflection resonates so much with my own situation. I have a younger brother who has ASD and severe learning disability (SLD). I now work as a Behavioural Specialist with children who have SLD and severe challenging behaviour. I feel my experiences give me a greater understanding and sense of empathy with the families I work with. My experiences with my brother and the people I have met through him have very strongly influenced my life - and for the better!

Mandy Griffin, Antrim

I was a young carer for my mum who has bipolar disorder. Growing up was quick, I was cooking, washing, cleaning, ironing, managing medication and providing constant support emotional and practical from age eight. All whilst also my helping look after my younger brother of three years. Making sure he and I got to school, dressed appropriately and fed. School was a challenge, I'd often have done a shift before getting there, exhausted. Homework time was difficult, finding time for anything for me was impossible. My family were my saving grace - grannies, aunties, uncles, cousins. They helped out with mum and looked after us when mum was too unwell to be at home with us. We survived it. It made us a close family. Not only that, it's shaped my future for the better. I was lucky enough at the age of 16 to have been linked in with my local young carers organisation. It gave me the chance to be a young person, to meet other young carers to know I wasn't alone and to go places and do things I never got the chance to growing up.

Marc Howard, Motherwell

I have four beautiful daughters. My third daughter has Rett syndrome which is a severe, neurological condition effecting all aspects of her life. I was absolutely devastated when I found out that my daughters are classed as young carers. It terrifies me. I want them to have a normal life. I realise that their life won't be normal but I'm desperate for it to be happy. Although my daughters are still very young, I do think that already they show a lot more love and kindness and empathy than other children that age. Our journey as a family really scares me - all we have to face in the future dealing with the difficulties Rett syndrome brings. However, I want to protect all of my daughters as much as possible. I want them to be happy and feel loved, feel secure and cared for.

Eva Hodgson, Tynemouth

I think it is so incredibly important to raise awareness of young carers for it is often assumed that every young person has it easily. I was a young carer for many years growing up and if people (both in schools and elsewhere) had a broader understanding of what it may be like as a carer, I think that it would benefit both the carer and the wider community.

James, Gosport

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Download these inspiring Nelson Mandela Day wallpapers
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Download these inspiring Nelson Mandela Day wallpapers

July 19 2018 | By: SADOF ALEXANDER

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It’s the centenary celebration of Nelson Mandela and to honour all the incredible ways he changed the world we’ve created a set of free downloadable backgrounds for your phone!

Over his lifetime, Mandela defended equality for all with courage and persistence, leading to the end of apartheid.

Since then, activists worldwide have turned to him for inspiration and followed in his footsteps to be part of the next great generation.

Have you been inspired by his timeless words of wisdom? Then wear your support on your screen with these Nelson Mandela Day phone wallpapers!

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GIVEAWAY: We’re celebrating 100 years of Nelson Mandela

17 July 2018 5:30PM UTC | By: ROBYN DETORO

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Every year on the 18th of July, we honour Nelson Mandela by highlighting his incredible life and legacy. This year is no exception and we’re going all out to celebrate what would have been his 100th birthday!

To make this centenary occasion extra special, we’ve partnered with the Nelson Mandela Foundation to create a limited edition t-shirt and we’re giving *100* of them away to YOU!

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Head on over to our Facebook, Twitter and Instagram pages to enter for your chance to win and if you’re not on social media, you can enter via Email

Limit one prize per person. Eligible participants must be at least 13 years of age or older and must answer how Nelson Mandela has inspired them and tag 3 friends in their comment on ONE’s competition post. The first contest window officially begins at midnight GMT on Tuesday, July 17, ending at 11:59 pm GMT on Monday July 23rd. By entering this contest, you are giving ONE permission to share your comment and/or response to ONE’s Facebook/Twitter/Instagram post on social media and on ONE.org. Winners will be selected at the sole and absolute discretion of ONE. Winners will be notified by direct message. You must respond to the message in order to receive the prize. Prizes cannot be exchanged for cash and are not transferable. No purchase or sale necessary to enter. Void where prohibited by law. This promotion is in no way sponsored by or associated with third parties such as Facebook, Inc. or Twitter, Inc. Sponsor information: The ONE Campaign, 1299 Pennsylvania Ave., NW, Suite 400, Washington, DC 20004

 

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HIV/AIDS

This just in: AIDS is still a crisis

July 24 2018 | By: JENNY OTTENHOFF

JOIN THE FIGHT

AIDS is still a crisis

 
  

You may not know it from watching the news or listening to policymakers, but AIDS is still a crisis.  New data released last week shows that the world is off track to reach key targets for HIV treatment and prevention by 2020. This puts us dangerously at risk of falling behind in the global fight against HIV/AIDS.

Incredible progress against HIV/AIDS over the last decade has created a false sense of security about an epidemic that still claims over 2,500 lives every day. Extraordinary medical advancements have overshadowed the cruel reality that an HIV diagnosis is still a death sentence for people who can’t get treatment.

untitled-design-2b.pngThe world may finally be inching past the halfway point in the global fight against AIDS, but with the population of young people most vulnerable to HIV growing rapidly, a status quo response could mean surrendering the whole fight.

Here are five reasons why AIDS is still a crisis and what you can do about it:

1. Nearly 1 million people died from AIDS-related causes last year alone – that is two people every minute.

2. The epidemic is growing by the minute. Globally, 1.8 million people became infected with HIV last year alone – that is three people every minute.

3. 15 million people with HIV still cannot get the life-saving treatment they needto live healthy and productive lives. Yet affordable and effective treatment options exist for as low as 20 cents a day.

4. Last year, 180,000 babies got HIV from birth or breastfeeding. Worse, this stat is trending in the wrong direction – 20,000 more babies were infected this year than last year. With treatment, mother-to-child-transmission of HIV is preventable.

5. Girls continue to be at higher risk for HIV than boys their age. Girls make up three out of four new infections among kids aged 10-19 in sub-Saharan Africa. These young people must be empowered and educated to stop this trend. However, on average only about one-third of young people in sub-Saharan Africa have the information they need to protect themselves from HIV.

We have the tools to end AIDS as a global crisis. We urgently need stronger financial and political commitments to ensure those tools get to the places and people who need them most.

This means donor countries need to continue high-level support for highly effective programs like the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) and the Global Fund. It also means governments in high-burden countries need to step up with the funding and policies to protect their citizens. Finally, citizens like you and I have an important role to play: remind your friends, colleagues, and policymakers that AIDS is still a crisis – but it does not have to be.

Click here to download the infographic and go to ONE.org/AIDS to join the fight.

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Music to your ears, eyes and brain: scoring gold standards in mental health

The Health Quality Mark scheme helps youth workers promote better health

Tue, Jul 17, 2018, 17:01
Sheila Wayman
 
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A group of teenagers meet regularly to learn and play music in Dublin as part of a mental health strategy within the youth service. The Swan Youth Service is based in Dublin's North Inner City. Video: Bryan O'Brien

 

Mental health wasn’t on the agenda when the Swan Youth Service started a weekly music group in the basement of its main centre in Dublin’s northeast inner city.

However, “it became apparent quite early on that the music was bringing up a lot of issues young people were experiencing”, says project leader Eibhlin Harrington.

Especially among those who write their own lyrics.

As she and her youth work colleagues heard themes of heartbreak, poverty, drugs and loneliness being explored through songs, they realised just how cathartic music-making could be for the youngsters – individually, within informal groups and performing for others.

“It helps them express themselves,” she says. “They feel they are being heard and they feel a connection with people with whom their music resonates.”

For Melvin Jamming, music is a way of coping with life. “It helps make sense of the emotions you are feeling,” he says.

He fell in love with the guitar as soon as he saw one at the Swan centre, which he started attending as a 15-year-old after arriving in Ireland from Mauritius a year earlier. Now aged 24, he’s a singer-songwriter who sometimes gigs in pubs but still drops in here most days, to play himself, jam with others or, as a young leader with the project, to help teach some of the younger ones.

From left, John White, Aaron Connolly, Conor McDonnell and Tamzin Brogan. Photograph: Nick Bradshaw for the Irish Times From left, John White, Aaron Connolly, Conor McDonnell and Tamzin Brogan. Photograph: Nick Bradshaw for the Irish Times

Music has “kept me going, kept me alive and kept me out of trouble”, he says. “When friends were out selling drugs, I would be in here writing.”

Tamzin Brogan (17), who has just done her Leaving Certificate, also drops in here – St Agatha’s Hall on Dunne Street – most days. She plays the guitar and is learning to play the piano.

 

“I struggle a lot with anxiety,” she says. If there’s trouble at home, “it’s a place I come to play music and get away from stuff”.

Aaron Connolly (19), who started playing bass last January after three years of learning the acoustic guitar, finds it good for clearing the head. “It takes my mind off everything.”

Like the other two, he comes almost daily from his home in Phibsborough. “I am not one of those fellas who hang around the street – I used to.”

Music lessons

They’ve all been taught to play by the centre’s gentle mannered music tutor, John White, a lifetime musician. On a recent Thursday afternoon, he’s giving Conor McDonnell (16) from Darndale his weekly keyboard lesson in an almost-completed recording studio off the main recreation room.

“I only got into music after I got hit by a car,” says Conor. He suffered post-traumatic stress disorder after the accident when he was 13 and discovered that listening to music helped. Now he wants to play it too.

John White, a lifetime musician, teachers at the Swan Youth Service in St Agatha’s Hall, Dunne Street, North Strand, Dublin. Photograph: Nick Bradshaw John White, a lifetime musician, teachers at the Swan Youth Service in St Agatha’s Hall, Dunne Street, North Strand, Dublin. Photograph: Nick Bradshaw

“It relaxes me,” he says. “It’s what I strive to do every day.” And Conor particularly likes how the more you practise the better you get: “You never get worse at it,” he smiles.

Last year Harrington completed a course in health promotion in youth work, certified by NUI Galway, which is an integral part of a Health Quality Mark (HQM) scheme that was developed by the National Youth Council of Ireland (NYCI). “It really opened my eyes to how broad health is,” she says.

Training

The 15 days of training are run every two years and the idea is that youth workers go back to their respective services to lead colleagues in looking at how they can promote better health for young people, staff and volunteers alike. The HQM, which is awarded at bronze, silver and gold levels, covers 12 criteria that are based on World Health Organisation best practice for health promotion.

Some 19 organisations have the HQM, while two are working towards it and another six are due to start next year. It has to be re-applied for every three years.

“You notice people who have gone through this process are not thinking about health in terms of a range of individual topics; they are taking a whole organisational approach to the issue and they are embedding health across everything the organisation is involved in,” says Louise Monaghan, health promotion consultant and trainer with the NYCI.

When the council is looking for grassroots information to feed back to policy-makers within, say, the HSE or the Department of Children and Youth Affairs, it is the HQM organisations it is most likely to consult.

“We know the work that they do is so good, we’re confident to be able to stand over it,” says Monaghan. 

Mental health issues

Mairead Mahon, director of the Swan Youth Service, which has a gold HQM, says that now they have health promotion ingrained within their organisation, they are looking to contribute nationally. For instance, they brought a group into the Children and Young People’s Policy Consortium, which is chaired by senior civil servants, to discuss mental health matters.

Mental health is the big issue they’re working with at Swan, she says. Due to a lot of shootings in the area in recent times, they are seeing trauma, secondary trauma and community-based trauma.

“Young people witness a lot; there’s surveillance and a general level of tension,” she says. This is on top of problems generic to disadvantaged communities, such as poverty, addiction and low expectations.

 

“A lot of kids get sucked into things at a very young age; there is intimidation. They all lead to levels of anxiety and depressive episodes,” Mahon adds.

While other HQM youth services may be working in very different settings from Swan, mental health is the top issue for them too. Being neither the young people’s parents nor their teachers, youth workers can develop a rapport that gives them a particular insight into the upcoming generation. Here’s a sample of what they’re seeing and doing:

Co Kerry

Training in “mental health first aid” has been invaluable for staff and volunteers working with Kerry Diocesan Youth Service.

With five youth centres throughout the county and four satellite centres, it sees a high level of mental health issues, says health promotion co-ordinator Rena Powell. Up to 4,000 youngsters, aged mainly 12-20, engage with its youth clubs, while about 700 more are referred for targeted services, such as crime diversion or a drug project.

Anxiety and very poor self-esteem are evident and this is affecting everything the young people do, she reports. Some struggle with suicidal thoughts.

The “first aid” training, completed as part of the service’s programme to retain a gold standard HQM at the end of last year, helps youth workers to recognise early signs of mental health issues and to know “how to support that individual until you get them to the more specialised service they require”, she explains.

Availability of professional help all depends on location. Tralee, for instance, is fairly well served, she says, with a Jigsaw early intervention service and the Kerry Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service.

A lot of our young people would have very adverse situations growing up

Powell has seen big changes during the 25 years she has worked with the youth service – the “major increase in young people seriously struggling around their mental wellbeing” being the main one. She and her colleagues have theories, if no proof, about the root causes.

“We can blame things like life experiences. A lot of our young people would have very adverse situations growing up.”

Others are affected by school experiences, such as bullying or a feeling of not belonging. “They definitely bring that with them into later teenage years.”

Then there’s alcohol and substance abuse. “More substance abuse than alcohol if I am honest; we would have high levels of young people using daily, whether it is prescribed drugs or something else. They become paranoid and dependent on it.”

Social media

Social isolation in rural areas used to be a huge challenge and while it has been alleviated by the widespread use of the internet, that has created new problems.

Social media is very positive in lots of ways but some young people suffer when it’s not used in the right way. What’s more, she points out, its instant nature creates constant expectation.

Powell has no doubt that anxiety issues are on the rise and it is not just a matter of people being more willing to talk about them. To a certain extent, she sees it as a peer-led phenomenon.

If you are daily encountering people with high anxiety and poor coping skills, “you kind of become part of that – it’s like ‘this is how we act’ almost. They certainly pick it up from each other a little bit.”

In saying that, she is not suggesting that they aren’t experiencing genuine difficulties but rather that they are, perhaps, buying into a way of behaviour which is not helpful.

Co Tipperary

After the same-sex marriage referendum in May 2015, the floodgates opened for LGBT questioning by young people, says Pauline Strappe, health promotion officer with Youth Work Ireland Tipperary.

 

As a result, focusing on LGBT health, wellbeing and identity was the biggest change for the service as it worked to retain its gold standard HQM, which was awarded in June. Operating six youth centres in the mid-Tipperary area, the organisation caters for ages eight to 24.

There is a LGBT support group for the whole county and, with funding from Healthy Ireland, it conducted research into these young people’s needs locally for its new sexual health policy.

“Some are questioning, some are in the zone; there are a couple of transgender young people we are supporting through their journey – and in rural Tipperary that is extremely difficult because there are no services for same,” says Strappe.

The thing that is coming through very strongly in Tipperary is that we have no mental health services

She does mental health awareness work with young people. “They are not disadvantaged groups, and wellbeing would be big in their minds,” she says. But for a colleague who works with young people involved in crime, or at the risk of being involved in crime, there would be greater emphasis on social health.

“The thing that is coming through very strongly in Tipperary is that we have no mental health services – we have CAMHS but the waiting list can be up to two years if you are not in crisis. We have no Jigsaw project; we have been campaigning in Tipperary for 10 or 12 years at this stage for Jigsaw.”

Suicide

A high-profile suicide in Carrick on Suir earlier this year caused much upset – even those who didn’t know the girl were very affected by her death. Youth work can provide one-to-one mentoring and support groups, but “that on its own is not enough”, she says.

During the school holidays, youngsters drop into the centres more frequently, “just for a chat or for the summer programme”. The service has teamed up with the local Sports Partnership to encourage them to try new sports such as paddleboarding and horse-riding. In June, it organised its annual hike up the Galtee mountains.

An Activ8 programme aims to get teens – girls in particular – to do eight activities during the summer that they haven’t done before, “so they are not lounging around”. Some are physical exercise but they include other things such as learning to cook “proper food”. 

Asked if they are swamped or under-utilised, she replies: “I would say both.” Young people speak with their feet so, if they like the youth workers and are comfortable in the space, groups fill themselves.

“You can be swamped,” she says. “You see new faces during the summer because they come in with their mates.”

However, she believes they are under-utilised because parents outside the towns may not be aware the centres are there and also that old image of the youth service being only for young people in trouble persists.

“We’re for everybody,” she stresses, pointing out that life’s transitions, such as starting secondary school, relationship breakups and going to college, happen right across the socio-economic spectrum. “Every young person struggles with those things.”

Strappe sees the three-year cycle for the HQM as “hugely important” for keeping health promotion at the forefront of all strands of youth work. And, after their LGBT initiatives, she thinks “spiritual health” might be the next area to tackle.

It “kind of knits into everything”, she says. Young people may not go to Mass “but they believe there is something there”. She sees their need for a moral compass.

“A lot of young people in today’s world haven’t that moral compass or something to guide them and, the more disadvantaged they are,” she adds, “the less support they have to teach them right from wrong.”

 

Co Carlow

Significant success in lowering anxiety levels among young people is reported by the Carlow Regional Youth Service, which has been the first youth organisation in Europe to run the Australian “Friends” programme.

It’s the only mental health and resilience programme that is recognised by the World Health Organisation as being effective in reducing and preventing anxiety, explains youth worker Leanne Sweeney. Now she and her colleagues are training other youth workers around the country in how to use it.

Every single young person had a significant reduction in anxiety at the end of it

They piloted it with young people aged 16-25 not in employment, education or training, having identified that it was mindset, rather than lack of education, which was the biggest factor holding them back.

“It was hugely successful. Every single young person had a significant reduction in anxiety at the end of it.”

They run the programme regularly and have recently done it with the 100-plus volunteers involved in running their summer camps.

“As practitioners, when we are in a better place ourselves, it has such a positive impact on our young people,” she points out. “I learnt that when I was training for the Health Quality Mark.”

Having achieved gold in the past, the Carlow service is about to reapply for its HQM. “Oddly enough,” she remarks, the application process is “really enjoyable. It is not just beneficial on paper, it genuinely has a feel-good factor when you are working on the wellbeing of young people and staff.”

One thing it is aiming to do is to move from just having a dedicated group for young people with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), to making all its activities within the eight projects ASD-inclusive.

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IMPACTNIÑAS Y MUJERES

Global Citizen lanza una nueva campaña para la igualdad de género

#SheIsEqual impactará en las vidas de más de 20 millones de mujeres y niñas.

Una cosa ha quedado en claro en los últimos 18 meses: las mujeres y las niñas merecen, y ahora exigen, ser tratadas como iguales. Los movimientos #MeToo y SheDecides de rápido crecimiento son el testimonio de un despertar en la sociedad de que las mujeres y las niñas son tratadas de manera diferente y retrasadas en todos los aspectos de la vida: en la escuela, los gobiernos, los sistemas de salud y el lugar de trabajo.

 

Como dijo Nelson Mandela, este es un gran descuido: "Mientras el país se niegue a reconocer el mismo rol de más de la mitad de sí mismo, está condenado al fracaso".

 

Y ahora, el mundo dio un paso en la dirección correcta con el lanzamiento de la campaña #SheIsEqual, que tiene como objetivo garantizar el cumplimiento de los compromisos clave de los líderes mundiales y la convocatoria de artistas y activistas en apoyo de la igualdad de género.

 

"I want it to be the dream of every girl out there, to teach the most powerful men in her country something. That will only happen if she is equal and getting her there is all of our responsibility." Florence “DJ Cuppy” Otedola, Global Citizen Education Ambassador @cuppymusic

 
 

Mientras miles de ciudadanos se reúnen en Bruselas para las Jornadas Europeas del Desarrollo, Global Citizen coorganizó un evento con Procter & Gamble, Bélgica y Luxemburgo, y la Fundación Bill y Melinda Gates, para marcar el lanzamiento de esta campaña vital que se alineó con el tema propuesto por los Días Europeos de Desarrollo 2018, "Mujeres y niñas a la vanguardia del desarrollo sostenible: proteger, empoderar e invertir". El evento reunió un amplio espectro de actores claves necesarios para impulsar un cambio genuino.

 

Hubo líderes mundiales: el Ministro de Desarrollo, Cooperación y Asuntos Humanitarios de Luxemburgo, Romain Schneider; El Secretario de Estado noruego Jens Frølich Holte; la Directora General Adjunta de Cooperación Internacional y Desarrollo de la Comisión Europea, Marjeta Jager; y el Viceprimer Ministro para Bélgica, Alexander De Croo.

 

Los líderes empresariales globales dedicados a impulsar el empoderamiento femenino también dijeron presente. Ranya Shamoon, vicepresidenta de Femcare para Europa de Procter & Gamble, explicó: "Ninguna niña debería faltar a la escuela como consecuencia de su período. Es muy simple, todas merecen acceso a la higiene y protección sanitaria”.

Actúa: Tuitea Ahora

 
 
 
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En asociación con: WSSCC


Anja Langenbucher, directora europea de la Fundación Bill y Melinda Gates, dijo: "En el centro de cada problema que estamos tratando de resolver, desde la pobreza hasta las enfermedades, está el de empoderar a las mujeres y niñas". Langenbucher agregó "no podemos lograr nuestros objetivos si la mitad de la población mundial se queda atrás y su talento y potencial continúan sin explotar".

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También estuvieron presentes Thoko Pooley, directora ejecutiva de Uniting to Combat NTDs, y Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, directora ejecutiva de ONU Mujeres y subsecretaria general de la ONU, para declarar #SheIsEqual. Mlambo-Ngcuka hizo un fuerte llamado a la unidad durante un panel, diciendo: "Un problema complejo, necesita una respuesta compleja. Cuanto más fragmentados estamos, menos impacto tenemos".


Y estos líderes no estuvieron simplemente allí para lanzar un pedido de ayuda a gobiernos y jefes de negocios. También hicieron sus propios compromisos.

 

Shamoon, en representación de Procter & Gamble, se comprometió a proporcionar a 400,000 niñas de toda India, África y China un suministro a largo plazo de toallas y apoyo educativo del programa Always Puberty & Confidence Education. Estas donaciones proporcionarán un acceso muy necesario al saneamiento y la higiene, que es clave para la educación, la salud y la dignidad de las niñas.

El Viceprimer Ministro belga De Croo también se comprometió en nombre de su gobierno a aportar 3 millones de euros (más de $ 3,5 millones de USD) en financiación para el movimiento SheDecides, dos tercios de los cuales se contribuirán al Programa mundial UNFPA / UNICEF para acelerar la acción que busca ponerle fin al matrimonio infantil, que se centra en la protección de las niñas en riesgo.

 

El millón restante se destinará a suministros de UNFPA para ayudar a los países con mayores necesidades, especialmente aquellos en situaciones de emergencia, a ayudarlos a fortalecer sus cadenas de suministro para que las mujeres y las adolescentes puedan acceder a una variedad de anticonceptivos sin importar dónde vivan.

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"Me complace unir fuerzas con Global Citizen para defender la igualdad de género y el empoderamiento de las mujeres", dijo De Croo. "Millones de niñas y mujeres no tienen acceso a anticonceptivos o servicios de planificación familiar, carecen de oportunidades educativas iguales o son discriminadas por la ley. Ellas necesitan nuestro apoyo. Bélgica nunca las defraudará".

 

Romain Schneider, Ministro de Cooperación al Desarrollo y Asuntos Humanitarios de Luxemburgo, anunció una nueva asociación con Girls Not Brides, una coalición mundial de 900 organizaciones de la sociedad civil comprometidas a poner fin al matrimonio infantil y permitir que las niñas desarrollen todo su potencial. Críticamente, el gobierno también anunció que sus 2 millones de euros de 2017 en apoyo financiero al UNFPA para apoyar a SheDecides fueron entregados y prometió ayuda adicional durante el Global Citizen Festival de 2018 en septiembre en Central Park.

 

Belgium’s Deputy Prime Minister Alexander De Croo just pledged €3 million towards the #SheDecides movement, to help provide women and adolescent girls’ access to contraceptives and reproductive health services, including in humanitarian crises. #SheIsEqual @alexanderdecroo

 
 

 

"¿Entonces, qué podemos hacer? ¿Qué debemos hacer? Creo que, primero, tenemos que crear conciencia y hacer que las personas entiendan que debe superarse el trato desigual de las mujeres y las niñas". Schneider llamó a la multitud a apoyar la nueva campaña: “por eso Luxemburgo, junto con nuestros amigos de Bélgica, Gates Foundation y Procter & Gamble, han elegido apoyar la nueva campaña 'She Is Equal' de Global Citizen que vamos a lanzar esta noche”.

 

Fiel al estilo de Global Citizen también hubo actuaciones que reunieron a la multitud. La poeta de la palabra hablada y la refugiada de Ruanda Lisette Ma Neza despertaron a la audiencia con su lucha personal para lograr la igualdad de género como refugiada.

Florence "DJ Cuppy" Otedola fue anunciada como Embajadora de Educación de Global Citizen y se comprometió a luchar por los 131 millones de niñas de todo el mundo que actualmente no asisten a la escuela. La estrella del pop local Axelle Red abrió la noche de un modo poderoso. "Estas chicas, estas víctimas, podrían ser tu hermana", dijo la cantante a la multitud durante su actuación, "Son nuestra hermana". 

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Romain Schneider, Luxembourg Minister for Development Cooperation and Humanitarian Affairs, Global Citizens’ Director of Global Policy and Government Affairs Madge Thomas and Belgium Deputy Prime Minister Alexander De Croo. Photo credit: Geert Van de Velde for Global Citizen

 

Por supuesto, esto es solo el comienzo. Durante el próximo año, vamos a necesitar tu ayuda para asegurar 20 nuevos compromisos y anuncios por un total de $500 millones que impactarán las vidas de 20 millones de mujeres y niñas. La campaña apoyará políticas dirigidas a asuntos críticos desde el fin de las muertes prevenibles de madres, recién nacidos, niños y adolescentes hasta la promoción de la salud y los derechos sexuales y reproductivos de niñas y mujeres.

 

"El progreso depende de valientes líderes políticos, activistas y ciudadanos comunes", dijo la Directora de Política Global y Asuntos Gubernamentales de Global Citizen, Madge Thomas: "quienes defienden la salud y la igualdad de derechos de las mujeres y las niñas". Un total de $500 millones puede parecer mucho, pero con tu voz podemos hacerlo posible. Y deberíamos, porque #SheIsEqual.

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En asociación con: SheDecides

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Sex worker activist gets top award at Aids conference

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ANA
South African sex worker activist Dudu Dlamini, centre, was recognised by the International AIDS Society yesterday for her work in advancing gender justice and health. Picture: ANA

South African sex worker activist Dudu Dlamini, centre, was recognised by the International AIDS Society yesterday for her work in advancing gender justice and health. Picture: ANA

Dudu Dlamini is the first winner of the Prudence Mabele Award, given in honour of the first black woman to publicly reveal her HIV status in SA.

South African sex worker activist Dudu Dlamini was recognised by the International AIDS Society yesterday for her work in advancing gender justice and health.

Dlamini became the first person to win the Prudence Mabele Award, an endowment made in honour of the first black woman to publicly reveal her HIV status in South Africa.

“I am a sex worker, a woman, an organiser, an advocate, lobbyist and ambassador for the rights of children with HIV,” said Dlamini, who is from the Sex Workers Education Advocacy Task Force (SWEAT).

“Sex workers don’t have money to take children to school, to buy their uniforms, to keep them safe when they go out to earn money to feed their children,” said Dlamini, who has started an organisation to help sex workers who are mothers.

“As a sex worker mother, it is very hard. Our children are often ashamed and angry and leave home and go off by themselves. The relationship between us and our children is broken,” said Dlamini.

The International AIDS Society (IAS) created the prize, which has the highest monetary value of all awards at the conference, through an endowment from the Ford Foundation and the Open Society Foundations, and in partnership with the Positive Women’s Network of South Africa, which Mabele headed.

Deputy President David Mabuza was initially supposed to present the award as head of the SA Aids Council, but he opted to attend the Brics summit instead.

 African News Agency (ANA)

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GIRLS & WOMEN

Colombia Shatters Glass Ceiling With Gender-Equal Cabinet

Colombia is getting its first female interior minister and women will head several other ministries.

 

By Anastasia Moloney

BOGOTA, July 26 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Half of Colombia's cabinet ministers will be women when the new government takes office next month in a first for the country and a boost for global gender equality.

Keeping to his campaign promise, conservative president-elect Ivan Duque, who takes over on August 7, has appointed equal numbers of men and women to his 16-strong cabinet.

"It is important that the Colombian woman assumes leadership positions. Colombia will have for the first time a female minister of the interior," Duque, of the right-wing Democratic Center party, tweeted earlier this month.

Take Action: Sign this petition to #LeveltheLaw and empower girls and women around the world!

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In partnership with: CHIME FOR CHANGE

Women will also head other ministries with political clout, including the ministries of justice and energy, while Marta Lucia Ramirez will be Colombia's first female vice president.

"This is very important in symbolic terms and it represents a cultural change. It will be difficult for future governments to go back on this and not continue with gender parity," said Beatriz Quintero, who heads the National Women's Network, which brings together more than a hundred rights groups in Colombia.

"A girl can now see a woman vice president and say, 'I want to be vice-president or president one day,'" she told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

Globally, women on average accounted for 23.4 percent of all parliamentarians in 2017, with the highest numbers found in Nordic countries and the lowest in Arab and Pacific island states, according to data from the Inter-Parliamentary Union (IPU), the international organisation of parliaments.

Read More: Mexico City Just Elected Its First Female Mayor

The country with the most women in its lower house is Rwanda, where women hold 61.3 percent of seats, followed by Bolivia, Cuba and Mexico, the IPU says.

 

MORE WOMEN, MORE MONEY

While there is no proof that women in leadership do more to advance women's rights than men, it can make a difference. Experts say they can boost the profile of often-overlooked issues, such as violence against women and the gender pay gap.

More women in leadership also drives economic growth, the United Nations says, and ensuring women's equal participation in politics by 2030 is one of the U.N.'s global goals.

In Colombia and across Latin America, important strides have been made to include more women in politics in recent years.

Voluntary or mandatory schemes - be it reserving seats for women candidates to parties setting their own gender quotas - have allowed for more women lawmakers.

Latin America has also seen a generation of female head of states from Brazil to Chile and Costa Rica.

Read More: Canada Will Welcome Women Foreign Ministers of the World in First-Ever Summit

But far less progress has been made at the local level, and especially among women from black and indigenous communities.

In Colombia less than 15 percent of mayors are women, while only one in every five parliamentarians are women.

The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR), the region's rights body, called on member states this week to adopt measures, including affirmative action, to boost the political participation of women from ethnic minorities.

(Reporting by Anastasia Moloney @anastasiabogota, Editing by Lyndsay Griffiths. (Please credit the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of Thomson Reuters, that covers humanitarian news, women's rights, trafficking, property rights, climate change and resilience. Visit http://news.trust.org)

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HEALTH

Health experts already planning for next Ebola outbreak in Congo

26 July 2018 4:34PM UTC | By: THOMSON REUTERS FOUNDATION

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This story was originally reported by Inna Lazareva and edited by Lyndsay Griffiths for the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

YAOUNDE — Democratic Republic of Congo may have declared an end to its ninth outbreak of the lethal Ebola virus since 1976, but health experts are already plotting ways to beat the next flare-up.

From vaccines to apps, myth-busting to health training, officials are looking at myriad options to better prepare the nation for what many fear is its inevitable future.

“It’s likely that we’ll be having a 10th outbreak,” Emanuele Capobianco, head of health at the International Federation of Red Cross & Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) told the Thomson Reuters Foundation in a telephone interview from Geneva.

“The issues that contributed to this outbreak – poor infrastructure, weak health and sanitation systems – are still with us,” Elhadj As Sy, secretary general of the IFRC, said in a statement.

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Health workers were among the first to receive the Ebola vaccine.

The latest outbreak, which the government declared over on Tuesday, began in May and is believed to have killed 33 people.

Ebola, thought to spread over long distances by bats, causes hemorrhagic fever, vomiting and diarrhoea. On average, the virus kills half of those it infects, according to the World Health Organization, and it is passed via body fluids.

It often spreads to humans via infected bush meat.

During the West Africa epidemic of 2014 to 2016, more than 28,600 people were infected and more than 11,000 died in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia.

Unlike previous Ebola outbreaks in the DRC, this one hit four locations, including a large city with links to the capital and to neighbouring countries, sparking fears of escalation.

Yet for the first time, the global health community in DRC was able to deploy a vaccine to contain its spread.

Developed by Merck and deployed by the World Health Organization, the vaccine was hailed as “a game changer” by DRC government officials after more than 3,300 people were immunised and no new cases of the virus were reported.

Capobianco described the vaccine as “potentially the biggest weapon” against future outbreaks of the disease.

But experts say myths and rumours must also be quashed.

COMMUNITY POLITICS

Marie-Claire Thérèse Fwelo, a WHO official who has worked on all nine Ebola outbreaks in her native DRC, said it was key to counter misinformation, citing rumours that the vaccine could make people sterile, or that Ebola was caused by a curse.

Some locals also defied medical advice and smuggled two dying Ebola patients out of hospital, taking them to a 50-strong prayer meeting instead, Reuters reported.

Communication and local collaboration are key, Fwelo said.

Ebola-blog2-content2.jpg

Experts from Guinea arrived in Mbandaka, DRC with invaluable expertise in conducting ring vaccination for Ebola. Photo Credit: @PeteSalama/Twitter

Health workers have trained local figures – including religious leaders, traditional chiefs, pygmy groups and even motorcycle-taxi drivers – on ways to stop the virus, she said.

“Now everyone wants to be vaccinated,” Fwelo said.

Locals must also keep up their surveillance, she added, explaining how teams go door to door to look for the sick or dead. “As international teams pack up and leave, these local responders will remain,” said IFRC’s Sy.

TECH TOOLS

Quick diagnosis is a challenge – the latest DRC outbreak may have gone undetected for months, according to a recent Lancet study – and technology could be a big help.

The IFRC’s Capobianco said mobile phones could be used to report suspected cases in real time, pinpointing locations and allowing analysts to map any outbreak. He conceded that such systems, however, depend on a functioning communications network, a problem in the most recent outbreak.

Ebola-blog2-social.jpgThe Red Cross is also developing a mobile phone data collection app to support response and recovery efforts.

In Tanzania, a new app lets locals record symptoms of suspected diseases, such as Ebola and cholera, on their phones. The data enables experts to make a diagnosis and alert the authorities to a potential outbreak faster.

For all the hope offered by new tech fixes, officials say it is changing people and their behaviour, as well as improving health facilities, that is most pivotal.

“If we talk new technologies, and the individuals are not ready – we will fail,” said Capobianco.

ONE welcomes the contributions of guest bloggers but does not necessarily endorse the views, programs, or organisations highlighted.

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HEALTH

World Health Worker Week: A physician’s dispatch from KwaZulu-Natal

April 4 2018 | By: GUEST BLOGGER

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This blog was originally published on IntraHealth International.

What’s it really like providing health services on the front lines? This week, frontline health workers from around the world are answering that question on VITAL, in honor of World Health Worker Week 2018. “It’s grueling,” they say. Sometimes exciting. Gratifying. Heartbreaking.

The following story is from Sanele Madela, a physician from South Africa and founder of Expectra 868 Health Solutions. He’s using his story to advocate for policy changes that could expand access to health care in his community and in others like it.

I grew up in the dusty streets of KwaZulu-Natal in South Africa. We had a population that was previously disadvantaged in South Africa and, up until today, part of that population is still disadvantaged.

We played on the streets with the other kids in the community. And there was one young girl—a neighbor who was a little older than me—she had health problems that we could not understand as young kids.

One day I came back from school and there was a group of ladies, including my mother, sitting around the girl’s house gate, and people were coming in and out of the house.

I was shocked to find out that the little girl had died. We were just playing the other day. And she was sick, but I never saw her go to the hospital.

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Later, I got a scholarship from the government of South Africa to go and study medicine in Cuba. I got the shock of my life to see that the population in Cuba was almost the same as the population where I grew up—they were just as disadvantaged, but they had access to health care, and that was a huge difference.

I wanted to contribute to my country’s access to health, and to the quality of health care available there. So, in my third or fourth year at medical school in Cuba, I started an NGO called Expectra 868 Health Solutions. Back in South Africa, by the second year of its functioning, it employed about 97 people. I became accredited to train community caregivers, to work in the community, and profile the community the way I was taught in Cuba.

Later, I got a grant from Medtronic Foundation and their HealthRise program, and was able to amplify what I had started by focusing on noncommunicable diseases, or NCDs, and offering screening, diagnosis, management, and care for NCDs.

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HealthRise has been a game-changer in these communities. For many of these patients, it is the first time they’ve seen a doctor, been touched by a doctor—you can see in their eyes what the HealthRise project has done.

For me as a doctor, seeing people—no matter how poor—gain access to health care was the most important thing that has happened in my life. No one should die just because she doesn’t have access to health care.

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Read more posts in this series and join the conversation online: #HealthWorkersCount#WHWWeek

This post is based on Sanele’s talk at SwitchPoint 2017, which was the first time he shared this story with a wider audience.  This storytelling initiative is a collaboration of IntraHealth International and Medtronic Foundation.

ONE welcomes the contributions of guest bloggers but does not necessarily endorse the views, programs, or organizations highlighted.

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A new direction for Irish folk music: Pádraig Rynne from NOTIFY

A new direction for Irish folk music: Pádraig Rynne from NOTIFY

Centred around the wizardry of concertina player and electronic sound designer Pádraig Rynne, NOTIFY are a band leading a new movement in Irish folk music, breathing new life into Trad, with a musical tapestry ranging from soft melodies to ‘crashing crescendos’.

Ahead of their performance at our Hotter Than July festival on Sunday 29th July, we spoke to Pádraig about his thoughts and approach towards Traditional Irish music.  

Q: Tell us a bit about the background of the style of Traditional music you play?

Within the band, four of us have a background in traditional Irish music with two of us growing up where it was central to our homes. Myself (Pádraig) and Cillian King are concertina players. We both grew up in homes where the rest of our family played Irish Traditional music. Both our fathers choose the accordions as instruments while our siblings played different instruments. Our Piano player Cormac, plays traditional fiddle sometimes although not within the band. His father is one of the best known traditional musicians in Ireland, Johnny McCarthy. Our drummer Davie grew up listening to the likes of Plenty and The Bothy Band. Both Cormac and Davie specialise in Jazz music as does our bass player Eoin. We combine these musical backgrounds together within the band using elements of Jazz and traditional music but all our music is original.

Q:  How did you approach learning these traditions? How do you think this approach compares with other genres or traditions?

As a kid, I learned using both notation and learning the music by ear. Having both of these as a way of learning has helped in adapting to the material that is put in front of me. While my theory is not to the highest of standards such as that of Eoin, Cormac or Davies, being able to learn quickly by ear means that we can get into a system of learning the musical pieces with a natural feel. Every musician adapts to use their best way of learning to suit their musical approach.

Q: What do you think is the best way to carry Irish traditional music forward into the 21st century, to a new generation of performers & audiences?

I think the way in which it is developing currently is quite healthy. It’s the same trend that has been there for decades. Traditional music has always developed, whether that be through style and melody playing or arrangements and instrumentation. There is no wrong way of doing it, as all tastes can be catered for. It’s the listener that must decide what suits their ear and adapt while hopefully not criticising what is not to their taste. We can learn from both what we find musically attractive and what we do not.

 

Thanks, Pádraig!

See Notify play live for free on Sunday 29th July in Smithfield Square at 'Hotter Than July' festival. More information HERE

Listen to Notify on Spotify HERE

– posted July 19th, 2018

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CITIZENSHIP

A Former Refugee Who Grew Up in Canada Just Scored a Record-Breaking Soccer Deal

Alphonso Davies was just transferred in a record-breaking deal.

 

As news continues to pour in about the world’s current refugee crisis, one refugee story this week is a happy one.

Earlier this week, Vancouver Whitecaps’ Alphonso Davies was transferred to German soccer club Bayern Munich in a record-breaking deal that could result in more than USD $22 million.

But what makes Davies' story so extraordinary isn't just the vast sums of money he was traded for; it's because of his family's journey to Canada. 

Take Action:  Call on Australia to Step Up to Support Migrants and Refugees!

 

 

Take Action: Tweet

 
 
 
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As Davies shared in an emotional address at the FIFA Congress in Russia this past June, his parents were forced to flee civil war in Liberia years ago, and he was actually born in a refugee camp in Ghana.

“It was a hard life,” Davies shared. “But when I was 5 years old, a country called Canada welcomed us in. And the boys on the football team made me feel at home,” he said.

Davies said he was a proud Canadian and that he dreams of competing in the World Cup.

Read More: 5 Ways Immigration Actually Enhances a Country's Culture

“I've played matches in Canada, Mexico, and the United States. The people of North America have always welcomed me. If given the opportunity, I know they'll welcome you,” he finished his speech.

 

#FCBayern are delighted to announce the signing of @AlphonsoDavies! ??

He’s joined the club on a contract running until 2023 ?⚪️#MiaSanMia

 
 

Bob Lenarduzzi, Vancouver Whitecaps president, told the Canadian Pressthat he had goosebumps during Davies’ address.

“I think his speech transcended soccer,” he told CP. “He did it with such poise and enthusiasm and was wide-eyed by the end of it. And I was so proud of him and just delighted for his family that they could live the Canadian dream.”

Read More: England's World Cup Team Would Be Unrecognisable Without Immigration

Davies’ future team, Bayern Munich, has won 28 German soccer titles and has been the winner of the UEFA Champions League five times, according to the Canadian Press.

“As a kid, I always dreamed of a moment like this,” Davies said in a statement. “Now that the dream has come true, the work continues as always. I have to keep pushing and keep striving, and also keep being me on the field.”

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JULY 31, 2018

 

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EDUCATION

7 Amazing Things About LeBron James' New School for Low-Income Students

"I want people to know that these kids should still have the same opportunity as everybody else."

Why Global Citizens Should Care
Public schools are facing budget cuts throughout the US, putting kids in precarious situations further at risk. LeBron James’ I Promise school is a vision of what a robust public school can look like — well-funded, holistic, and inspirational. You can take action for universal quality education here.

When LeBron James was in the fourth grade, he missed around 100 days of school because of a lack of structure in his life.

The basketball legend might’ve fallen further behind and eventually dropped out had it not been for the help of a sports mentor, but James ended up returning to school on a regular basis — and the rest is history.

Now James wants to pass on his good fortune to similarly struggling youth, according to SB Nation.

Take Action: Call on US Government and Business Leaders to #FundEducation

Take Action: Sign Petition

 
 
 
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In partnership with: CHIME FOR CHANGE

On Monday, James opened the “I Promise” school, a collaboration with Akron Public Schools in Akron, Ohio, which seeks to help kids who are behind in their educations get back on track.

“I want people to know that these kids should still have the same opportunity as everybody else,” he said at the school’s opening. “That’s what’s most important. Us as adults, we have a responsibility to not let these kids down, to continue to be the teachers, the mentors, the parents, the coaching, the life skills, the superheroes ... whatever it is that gives the inspiration, everything, that’s our responsibility. These kids are our future and they have dreams and aspirations bigger than the city of Akron, than the state of Ohio, than the USA.”

The school currently serves 240 at-risk third and fourth graders, but will expand each year to eventually span first grade through eighth grade, SB Nation reports.

James is the primary donor of the school and his experience informs the school’s above-and-beyond approach to learning.

Read More: LeBron James’ ‘I Promise School’ Will Help At-Risk Kids With Specially Designed Curriculum

“We are going to be that groundbreaking school that will be a nationally recognized model for urban and public school excellence,” I Promise principal and Akron native Brandi Davis told USA Today. “We are letting people know it is about true wrap-around support, true family integration, and true compassion.”

Here are seven amazing aspects of the I Promise school.


1. The school will be open longer than traditional schools

AP_18212107874335.jpgAP Photo/Phil Long

James said that for many kids who grow up in poverty, time outside of school can be dangerous because of potential exposures to violence and bad habits.

The I Promise school will be open longer than normal schools, with regular school hours going from 9 a.m. through 5 p.m. and extracurricular activities afterward. There will also be a seven-week summer camp each year, according to the Los Angeles Times.

And James' commitment to the students doesn't end there. He's promised to fund college tuition at Akron University for all students who complete the I Promise curriculum.


2. There’s an on-site food bank

 

 

Registration is open for Operation Orange, the Foodbank’s sixth annual 24-hour volunteer event on September 7 & 8! Register today at http://OpOrange.org !

 
 

 

Throughout the US, 41 million people struggle with hunger, including 13 million kids, according to Feeding America, which has a enormous impact on their ability to concentrate and learn in school.

To make sure students are getting what they need to eat, the I Promise school has an on-site food bank stocked by the Akron-Canton Regional Foodbank to include fruits, vegetables, and everyday staples.

Read More: LeBron James: ‘Racism Will Always Be Part of the World’


3. The school offers GED classes and job training for parents

 

View image on TwitterView image on TwitterView image on Twitter
 

LeBron James promise to Northeast Ohio is being fulfilled this morning. The I Promise School opens this morning in Akron! For more details tune into @wkyc. @lebron @IPROMISESchool #Akron #IPromise #CLE

 
 

Kids have a harder time thriving if they’re guardians aren’t thriving, so in its mission to be holistic, the I Promise school will help parents succeed in life with GED classes and job training programs, according to the Times.


4. Students will be taught how to cope with trauma

 

Early childhood trauma can significantly impair a student’s ability to learn. Similarly, ongoing stress and trauma in a student’s life can be harm his or her ability to process information, regulate emotions, and much more.

The I Promise school will offer both therapy and classes on how to deal with trauma.


5. Every student gets a bike

 

James often says that his childhood bicycle gave him a sense of freedom that prevented him from going down the wrong path. As a result, he’s giving every student in the school a new bicycle. For kids who live nearby, having a bike is also a great way to commute to school. 

Read More: LeBron James Just Delivered Nikes He Helped Design for Kids With Disabilities


6. They also get Chromebooks

 

A growing educational disparity in the US involves internet access, and while the I Promise school isn’t equipping each student’s home with Wi-Fi, each student is receiving a Chromebook laptop made by Google so they can do their homework and study.


7. The school is beautiful

 

View image on TwitterView image on TwitterView image on TwitterView image on Twitter
 

@KingJames dream of opening a school in his hometown is now a reality?. ? LeBron on NBA TV at 3:30 pm/EST as he discusses the opening of @IPROMISESchool ?

 
 

As schools around the country face problems from crumbling ceilings and walls to insect infestations to failing central air systems, the I Promise school sets a different example.

Read More: How Steph Curry and Lebron James Stack Up in the Charity World

The school has state-of-the-art classrooms and laboratory spaces, inspirational murals throughout, and areas for after-school activities.

 

View image on TwitterView image on TwitterView image on TwitterView image on Twitter
 

We’re excited to team up and create this mural for the I Promise School in Akron. The artwork took about 3 weeks and couldn’t be happier how it turned out! The school is amazing and has the potential to radically change education and do great things!

 
 

 

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83
GIRLS AND WOMEN

Here are 10 amazing comments on why ALL #GirlsCount

13 July 2018 3:04PM UTC | By: ROBYN DETORO

JOIN

Join the fight against extreme poverty

 
  

Last year, we partnered with Fossil to spread the word about the importance of girls’ education. To celebrate, we hosted a competition to give away 3 #GirlsCount tote bags by Fossil and asked YOU to share why all #GirlsCount.

As usual, we were blown away by the incredible responses. Keep reading below to hear from our winners themselves!

IMG_1941.jpg

#GirlsCount x Fossil winner, Chipo.

CHIPO, South Africa

#GirlsCount because they equate a full circle when included in sustainable and social development. They count because they are part of the human race. They count because they are the future and backbone of society.

IMG_20180702_113349-2-1024x1024.jpg

#GirlsCount x Fossil winner, Zack.

ZACK, Kenya

Show me a country that disregards women and girls and I will show you a failed state. The backbone of any society that respects girls also values equity and equality and upholds positive values, creating empowered communities. Girls need opportunity not sympathy, they need equality and equity. Girls count because they are our daughters, sisters and future mothers. Girls count because we count.

CATHERINE, United States of America

#GirlsCount because until everyone is able to thrive, personally and professionally, the world will not reach its true potential socially, economically or politically. Everyone has to be fully involved.

We couldn’t resist sharing a few more brilliant comments from our members! #GirlsCount because… 

We are unstoppable and we do what we put our mind to. We can achieve anything. We keep things running and if you give us a problem we make a solution out of it. — Hellena N.

We are amazing just as we are. — Cannel E.

Every girl has the potential to become a strong and wonderful woman who can make someone’s, or even everyone’s, world better. — bichoalcatifa

They are worthy of celebration; worthy of recognition; worthy of education and they make us one. — thatpublicschoolteacher

They are part of this world of diversity and they should be counted for what they are!!! — halima.laoualb

How can we live in a successful world when we are not using 50% of the world’s brain power? — taeschbach

They are the bedrock of any society and to achieve any change they must be fully involved. — adeolaraj

Inspired? Share why you think ALL #GirlsCount in the comments!

*answers have been edited for clarity.

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FINANZAS E INNOVACIÓN

Científicos crearon una alternativa natural al plástico

Este nuevo material tiene el potencial de reemplazar los empaques de plástico.

Por qué los Global Citizens deberían preocuparse
Gran parte del plástico de un solo uso del mundo, incluida la envoltura de plástico utilizada comúnmente para evitar que los alimentos se echen a perder, termina en vertederos y océanos donde destruyen ecosistemas y dañan la vida marina. Esta alternativa plástica podría ayudar a reducir el problema plástico mundial al proporcionar un reemplazo biodegradable para estos plásticos de un solo uso. Toma medidas para reducir la contaminación plástica aquí.
 

 


Los científicos han creado un material flexible, derivado naturalmente de cáscaras de cangrejo y árboles que podrían reemplazar las envolturas de plástico.

 

El mundo ha producido 9 mil millones de toneladas de plástico desde que el material se inventó por primera vez en la década de 1950. La gran mayoría no se recicla. En la actualidad, los plásticos y embalajes de un solo uso son un importante contribuyente a los desechos plásticos a nivel mundial. Alrededor de 25 millones de toneladas de envases de plástico, incluidas las envolturas de plástico, terminan en los océanos todos los años.

 

Pero los investigadores del Instituto de Tecnología de Georgia han creado un nuevo material que podría ayudar a frenar el uso del plástico en el mundo y evitar el desperdicio de alimentos. En lugar de envolver los alimentos en plástico, el material se construye en base a alimentos usando dos aerosoles alternados. Los aerosoles contienen quitina, que se puede encontrar en las conchas de cangrejos, langostas y gambas, combinado con celulosa que se encuentra en las fibras de los árboles. Las capas de aerosoles forman una capa protectora alrededor de los alimentos que es transparente y totalmente compostable cuando se seca.

 

El equipo encontró que este material biodegradable puede ser incluso más efectivo que una envoltura de plástico para mantener frescos los alimentos.

 

"Nuestro material mostró una reducción del 67% en la permeabilidad al oxígeno en algunas formas de PET (tereftalato de polietileno, comúnmente utilizado en el plástico)", explicó el investigador y profesor J. Carson Meredith en un comunicado de prensa. "Lo que significa que podría, en teoría, mantener los alimentos frescos por más tiempo".

 

Los científicos se inspiraron para crear el material después de estudiar el uso de quitina como parte de un proyecto diferente. Pero pronto descubrieron que las propiedades vegetales de las fibras de los árboles proporcionaban un gran complemento a la quitina.

 

"Reconocimos que debido a que las nanofibras de quitina están cargadas positivamente, y los nanocristales de celulosa están cargados negativamente, podrían funcionar bien como capas alternas en los recubrimientos porque formarían una buena interfaz entre ellos", dijo Meredith.

 

El equipo espera que el material ayude a reducir el empaquetamiento de alimentos, que probablemente aumente a medida que la población mundial crezca sin alternativas más ecológicas.

 

"Habíamos estado buscando nanocristales de celulosa durante varios años y explorando formas de mejorar los que se usan en composiciones más livianas y envases de alimentos, debido a la gran oportunidad de mercado para los envases renovables y compostables, y la importancia de los envases de alimentos en general a medida que la población continúa creciendo", dijo Meredith.

 

Sin embargo, es poco probable que el material esté disponible públicamente en el corto plazo. Aunque la celulosa se puede cosechar de manera sostenible de la pulpa de madera, la celulosa producida en masa no está disponible aún, y los costos de producción del material son demasiado altos para que esté ampliamente disponible por el momento.

 

Mientras tanto, ya existen varias alternativas al plástico que podrían ayudar al mundo a obtener otra victoria en la lucha contra la contaminación y el cambio climático.

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CITIZENSHIP

Beyoncé Leads Vogue to Feature Its First-Ever Black Cover Photographer

The magazine has been in publication for 126 years.


Why Global Citizens Should Care
For decades, the fashion industry has notoriously lacked diversity. Thanks to champions like Beyoncé, that is now beginning to change. Seeing diversity represented in the media and the world around us is key to empowering young people and combating discrimination. You can join us by taking action here to reduce inequality and achieve the Global Goals.

For the fashion-conscious, being featured on the cover of Vogue magazine is a major honor. To be featured on the cover of its September issue — its most important and prestigious issue — is monumental.

So, of course, this year’s Vogue September issue will feature none other than the queen herself, Beyoncé Knowles-Carter. And in true Beyoncé style, the powerhouse entertainer will make history with her cover, the first in Vogue’s 126-year history to be shot by a black photographer.

Queen Bey was given full control over the issue’s cover, the photos of her within the magazine, and their accompanying captions, two sources familiar with the agreement between Vogue and Beyoncé told HuffPost.

Take Action: Sign the Year of Mandela Declaration and Commit to Be the Generation to End Extreme Poverty

Take Action: Sign Now

 
 
 
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Beyoncé reportedly used her creative power over the issue — unprecedented for someone not on Vogue’s staff — to have 23-year-old Tyler Mitchell be her photographer.

Mitchell is a recent graduate of NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts, who, despite his young age, has already made a name for himself working with influential figures like designer Marc Jacobs and rapper Kevin Abstract of the group Brockhampton. 

The Atlanta-born photographer was featured last year in the New York Times’ “Up Next” series of up-and-coming artists. Of his work, which often focuses on people of color, he said: “I depict black people and people of color in a really real and pure way. There is an honest gaze to my photos.”

A source familiar with Vogue’s editorial process told HuffPost that the magazine’s editor-in-chief, Anna Wintour, would not have chosen Mitchell for the cover shoot. Wintour reportedly prefers to use photographers with more experience in the fashion industry — an industry that has only recently begun to embrace diversity.

“The reason a 23-year-old black photographer is photographing Beyoncé for the cover of Vogue is because Beyoncé used her power and influence to get him that assignment,” the source said.

Read More: Sandra Oh Is the First Asian Woman to Be Nominated for a Lead Actress Emmy

This September’s issue is rumored to be Wintour’s last, though Vogue parent company Condé Nast has insisted the fashion icon will not be leaving the publication.

People on social media are praising Beyoncé using her cover shoot to help increase the industry’s diversity and create opportunities for people of color.

 

OF COURSE Beyoncé hires a black photographer for her Vogue cover and it just happens to be the first in the issue’s history. That’s Beyoncé. THAT IS BEYONCÉ.

 
 
 

I’m 23.
So is Tyler Mitchell.
Tyler Mitchell was hired by Beyoncé to be the first Black photographer to shoot a Vogue issue.

I can’t help but be inspired.

 
 
 

I will never be ashamed of loving this woman. Who else TAKES VOGUE AWAY FROM ANNA WINTOUR only to deliberately highlight how shes denied black artists opportunities AND kickstart overdue progress by hiring their first ever black photographer. This ladys something ELSEEE I tell u pic.twitter.com/s0TBtcjTJ9

 
 
 

Beyoncé hiring a 23 year old black photographer for her Vogue cover, making him the first black photographer to shoot for vogue in 126 years!!! Is what we should ALL strive to do when given the opportunity to put someone else on and change the status quo!

 
 
 

Thrilled that @Beyonce arranged for a black photographer to do her cover shoot for Vogue. But ...ahem...why was @Beyonce the one to correct this decades long omission and and not @voguemagazine ???

 
 

But many were also critical of the fact that it took more than a century for Vogue to feature the work of a black photographer on its cover. Others lamented that the first black cover photographer was hired at the request of a celebrity, rather than of the magazine’s own initiative.

 

Please spend some time thinking about the fact that we are gonna see the first Vogue cover shot by a black photographer in the history of the magazine. Just spend some time with that.

 
 
 

It’s amazing, and embarrassing for them, that Vogue has never before had a Black photographer work on their cover. And Beyonce changed that, not Vogue.

 
 
 

Wait.

It’s taken Vogue 126 years to have a black photographer shoot its cover?!

 
 
 

excuse me i am still trying to understand how vogue has been around for one hundred and twenty six years and has never had a black photographer work on a cover.

 
 

Beyoncé has appeared on four Vogue covers and was featured on the 2015 September issue. But seeing on the cover of Vogue again, this time shot by a black photographer, is bound to inspire many.

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