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The Action Thread Part Two

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The Care Act

The Care Act 2014 is the law covering social care (care and support), bringing together many existing laws and creating some new important rights

The Care Act tells local councils across England what they need to do if someone needs social care support.

It also tells councils what they have to do if they know someone is caring for a family member or friends and needs support as a carer.

7 key things about The Care Act

  1. Local authorities must always put people's wellbeing at the heart of its decision making.
  2. Local authorities have new duties to provide information and advice; for example about how the system works, how to manage the financial aspects of meeting care needs, and especially how to help prevent, delay or reduce the need for care and support - to keep people as healthy and independent as possible.
  3. Carers now have similar rights to services to the people they care for, including the right to an assessment.
  4. There are new national eligibility criteria to decide who is eligible for care and support from the local authority.
  5. More people will have the right to an advocate if they find it difficult to communicate or to understand something.
  6. There are new rules to make it easier for people to keep getting care and support if they move house to a different local authority area.
  7. If you get social care support, you will now have a right to request a personal budget if you're not offered one.

Want to know more?

Read the Department of Health's factsheets on the Care Act.

Read the Department of Health's easy read guide on the Care Act.

3 rights every carer should know about

If you care for a disabled adult, you'll be glad to know that the Care Act strengthens your rights. Here are 3 keys rights you should know about:

  1. A carer will be entitled to an assessment if it appears that a carer needs support. The carer's assessment must establish whether the carer is willing and able to continue providing care to the person they are caring for, what impact this has on the carer's wellbeing, what outcomes the carer wishes in day-to-day life, and whether the carer wishes to access education, training or recreational activities.
  2. The carer will have the same rights to an assessment and support as the disabled adult themselves. Therefore, once a carer's assessment has been carried out, the local authority will see which of the carer's needs are eligible for support, and will then produce a support plan to meet the carer's needs.
  3. Local authorities are under a duty to meet a carer's eligible needs, subject to financial assessment.

Support for carers

Useful resources

We've created the following factsheets to help you with the benefits application, Care Act assessment and follow-up process:

  • Delays in receiving benefits (PDF, 52 KB) - this factsheet explains the options that may be available to you whilst you're waiting for your first payment.
  • Mandatory reconsiderations (PDF, 48 KB)  - this factsheet explains what to do if you wish to challenge a benefit decision.
  • Reasonable adjustments (PDF, 425 KB) - this factsheet explains what changes should be made by the Job Centre and DWP for people with a learning disability who are looking to claim benefits.
  • What happens next (PDF, 367 KB) - this factsheet sets out what should happen after your Care Act assessment.
  • Reviews and new assessments (PDF, 219 KB) - this factsheet is for people who already receive care and support through a package of social care and what they can expect from the review and assessment process.
  • Direct payments (PDF, 72 KB) - this factsheet explains how people with a learning disability and their families can receive direct payments to arrange their social care support themselves.

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Advice and support for parents

How to support your child if they're being bullied

Breadcrumb

If your child is being bullied, it can be hard to know what to do. We’ve got tips on preventing and stopping bullying, talking about it, support available for you

We all deserve to be treated with dignity and respect. And we all have a part to play in working together to move beyond bullying - parents, carers, teachers, students, managers, employees and the community.

Be a role model

First of all, teachers, parents and carers should encourage young people to treat others fairly, and model positive behaviour.

Talk about bullying

Many people with a learning disability find it hard to understand what bullying is or if it is happening to them.

Finding someone who will listen and give them the right support can also be a challenge, and this in turn can seriously damage their self-esteem. It is important that they are listened to.

Proactively talking about bullying is a great way to tackle bullying behaviour, because you might be able to stop it early on or prevent it altogether.

Talk to your child about bullying so that they know what it is and that they can feel comfortable telling you about any experience that could be bullying.

You can also help them be more prepared if they experience bullying behaviour so that they can respond in the best way and try to stop it early.

Talking about bullying with someone with communication difficulties

We all show our feelings differently, and there are many ways we can communicate if we are being bullied. If your child has difficulty communicating, you can encourage them to explore different ways of letting you know you how they feel:

  • Writing it down in a letter to you.
  • Using toys or teddies to re-enact experiences they've had.
  • Drawing what has happened to them.
  • Pointing to an emotion chart or using emotion flash cards. You can make these, download them or buy them online. Your child can point to a smiley face, a sad face, an angry face or other visuals that help show how they are feeling.

How to react as a parent

Hearing that someone you love and care for is being bullied is very hard to hear. You might be upset or angry, but it’s important to stay calm and listen to the full story. Here are five steps you can take to handle the situation:

  1. Talk openly about bullying so your child knows how to recognise it and that they can trust you and talk to you about their feelings. People don’t want to make their parents feel angry or sad - if they think you will respond like this, they might not talk to you about their bullying experiences.
  2. Respond calmly and with empathy - listen, offer a hug and ask them how this made them feel.
  3. Find out the details, and calmly reassure them that it’s not their fault and they did the right thing speaking to you about it.
  4. Be sympathetic and ask questions to get details. You can write down what has happened, the dates and times, places where the bullying took place, and if anyone else was around to see it. These details are important, because they will help you explain what has happened to a teacher and take steps to resolve the issue.
  5. Talk through the situation and help them form a plan of what to do next - empower them to take control and feel safe.

Working with the school to resolve the issue

If your child has told you that they are being bullied at school, here are some steps you can take to resolve the issue:

  1. Talk to the bully: If your child feels that they can talk to the bully and ask them to stop, that is the first place to start. If they feel uncomfortable or unable to do so, speak to their teacher.
  2. Talk to a teacher: Your child may prefer to talk to their teacher themselves, or they may prefer you to talk to their teacher for them. Make sure you keep talking to your child for updates about how the situation is being dealt with. If you speak to their teacher, stay calm and polite, and explain the details of the situation. The teacher should listen and deal with the situation sensitively. 
  3. If the teacher doesn't take it seriously: It can be frustrating when you speak to the school about a bullying incident and they don't take it seriously or take steps to resolve the issue. Schools should have an anti-bullying policy. Find out what it is and have a calm conversation with them to make sure that they are following their own policy.
  4. Write a diary: write down dates, times, any witnesses, who is involved and other details that can help you record what is happening and convince the school to act on it.
  5. If the bullying continues: If the bullying continues or you think it is harassment, you can report the abuse to the police. See mate and hate crime.
  6. Support from your local council: Many communities provide local resources to help tackle bullying. The more we become aware of bullying at school, the more likely they’ll take steps to tackle it. Your local council website should have information about anti-bullying schemes.

What you can do to improve your school’s response to bullying

  • Share with the school the government's guidance on tackling and preventing bullying.
  • Ask your teacher to arrange for a professional speaker to talk to the whole school about bullying.
  • Report ineffective school response to bullying to a local newspaper. School administrators will be quick to change their attitudes if they think they might look bad in the news.
  • Write to the school chair of governors.

After the bullying

It is important to get the right support to stop the bullying behaviour and then to manage any lasting effects of the bullying if needed.

  • Focus on looking after the person who has been bullied.
  • If things don’t improve, see if a friend, family member or counsellor can offer the right support. You may need support as well as your child, so finding someone you can talk to is also important.
  • If the person you support is anxious or depressed take them to see a doctor and get professional support for them.
  • Try to be proactive and keep busy, focusing on positive activities like making things and seeing friends.
  • Have patience - it can take time for someone to process what they have been through, get their confidence back and be around people again.

Resources

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GIRLS AND WOMEN

Breaking the cycle with cycling: The history of bikes as empowerment

April 6 2018 | By: SADOF ALEXANDER

 
  

Throughout history, many inventions have undoubtedly helped women. Everything from birthing kits, to video technology, to agricultural developments, and so much more have helped women thrive and fight for better, more equal lives. Among all the great products that have impacted women around the world, there is an unsung hero: the bicycle.

You might be thinking: What do bikes have to do with gender equality? As it turns out, a whole lot!

The long journey of the bicycle, originally called a velocipede, began in 1817. By the end of the 19th century, they had gained popularity around the world, and women wanted to be part of the craze. Early female riders faced social stigma, issues with clothing, and even harassment. One such rider, Emma Eades, was attacked with bricks and stones while riding the streets of London because her actions were considered improper.

Despite the challenges in the way, more and more women began riding bicycles because they were able to easily travel without a chaperone, making bicycles into a suffragette symbol for freedom. It’s no wonder that Susan B. Anthony claimed the invention “has done more to emancipate women than anything else in the world. It gives women a feeling of freedom and self-reliance.”

Though women have come a long way on bicycles, the fight for the right to ride rages on. There is a clear need for women to have access to bicycles, but issues of safety, street harassment, and poor infrastructure can still limit bike transportation for women.

Across the world, this problem can have even worse consequences. Lack of transportation plays an enormous role in many of the barriers to education, including having to travel great distances, how safely students can travel, how much time they have to commute, and the social stigmas around bicycling.

Social perceptions, in particular, have had terrible effects on women. In Iran in 2016, a group of women was arrested for violating modesty laws by riding bikes. Women riding bikes have also been discouraged in nations like Saudi Arabia, Egypt, and Afghanistan.

Though issues with women riding bikes still exist in places around the world, the solution remains the same: Create access to bikes and encourage people to ride. Cycling campaigns have popped up all around Africa, including the Village Bicycle Project and the Ghana Bamboo Bikes Initiative. According to World Bicycle Relief, access to bikes can allow women and girls in Africa better access to education, healthcare, and employment. Women can also experience an increase in safety when traveling in comparison to walking.

Bicycles have long served as a source of empowerment, and the trend continues to this day. When denied equal rights and opportunities, women fight through rough terrain and create their own paths.

 

P-S_ONEbike_V6.gif
ONE welcomes the contributions of guest bloggers but does not necessarily endorse the views, programs, or organizations highlighted.

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GIRLS & WOMEN

Maryland Passed a Bill to Strip Rapists of Parental Rights

The law will allow victims to terminate their rapists’ rights to children conceived from the rape.

A shred of justice is finally being restored to women who become pregnant as the result of rape in Maryland.

After nearly a decade of campaigning and nine failed legislative proposals, both the Maryland Senate and House approved a bill allowing courts to terminate the parental rights of rapists to a child conceived as a result of their crime this week, the Baltimore Sun reported.

The bill nearly passed last year, but ultimately died when the all-male panel of lawmakers appointed to reconcile the Senate’s and House’s different versions of the bill failed to do so, the Washington Post reported.

Take Action: Tell World Leaders to Redouble Their Efforts By Amending Laws to Prevent Sexual Violence

 

Take Action: Sign Petition

 
 
 
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In partnership with: Equality Now and CHIME FOR CHANGE

 

But politicians and advocates have been determined not to let history repeat itself and allow justice to elude victims of sexual assault any longer.

Senate PresidentThomas V. Mike Miller Jr., a Democrat, said he was determined that the bill should pass, and that “If necessary it’s going to be six women on the conference committee somehow to make sure it does pass.”

There are still a few steps left in the process — the Senate and House must still approve each other’s bills and then the governor needs to sign the final bill — but Gov. Larry Hogan has said he “will sign it into law the moment it reaches [his] desk,” the Baltimore Sun reported.

Once official, the law would require a rape victim to provide “clear and convincing evidence” that she was sexually assaulted and that the termination of the perpetrator’s parental rights would be in the best interest of the child, the Washington Post reported. Parental rights can already be similarly terminated in Maryland in instances of child-abuse, even without a criminal conviction.

Read more: Joe Biden Shared a Powerful PSA About Sexual Assault That Everyone Needs to See

In seven US states, including Maryland, the law currently does not protect rape victims who are impregnated by their assailants from child custody fights, according to CNN.

While this law represents a major win for rape victims in Maryland, it does not guarantee justice to survivors of sexual assault.

In 2012, 18.2% of women in Maryland said they had been raped or attempted to be raped at some point in their lives, according to government data. And the Maryland Coalition Against Sexual Assault estimates that tens of thousands of children are sexually assaulted in the state every year.

In Maryland, as in several other states, a child can be married before she turns 18 if she is pregnant, even if she is pregnant as a result of rape. This means that a child as young as 15 could be forced to marry her rapist if she is pregnant in Maryland, and that both she and her child might not be protected by this new law.

Read more: This Is What It’s Like to Be a Mom at 10 and Married at 11 in Florida

Bills to end child marriage in the state have been proposed over the last two years, but have yet to succeed. However, Del. Vanessa Atterbeary, who introduced the bills, has said she’s not giving up and will try again this year, according to the Daily Record.

Poll | Girls & Women
863 Answered

Did you know that 25 states have no minimum age of marriage under certain circumstances, including if a girl is pregnant?

No.Yes.
 

Global Citizen campaigns in support of gender equality and a fair chance for all children. Take action to urge lawmakers to strengthen laws preventing sexual violence and stop child marriage.

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JULY 3, 2018

 

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ENVIRONMENT

Pakistan Plants 1 Billion Trees in Massive Reforestation Project

They did not sleep on this.


Why Global Citizens Should Care
Pakistan was named by the UN as one of six countries to be most affected by climate change, which disproportionately impacts people living in extreme poverty. The more steps taken to combat the effects of extreme weather, the better the chances vulnerable populations have of survival. You can join us in taking action on these issues here.

The hills of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa are green once more, thanks to a massive reforestation effort by the Pakistan government called the Billion Tree Tsunami.

The Middle Eastern country hit its billion-tree goal in August 2017, well ahead of schedule, and is now seeing the fruit of that labor in more than 350,000 hectares of saplings produced both by planting and natural regeneration, World Economic Forum reports.

Take Action: Educating Girls Strengthens the Global Fight Against Climate Change

Take Action: Tweet Now

 
 
 
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“The project is naturally restoring a previously deforested landscape, which will assist in meeting present and future needs and offers multiple benefits for climate adaptation and mitigation in a very climate-vulnerable province,” said Muhammad Tehmasip, project director of the Billion Tree Tsunami, in an earlier interview with the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

 

Khyber Pakhtunkhwa had previously lost large swaths of forest to decades of felling, which made it vulnerable to flooding and landslides, noted the World Economic Forum report. In 2016, when flash floods hit the province, dozens of people were killed.

 

Read More: 7 Easy Steps to Becoming an Environmentally Conscious Global Citizen

Imran Khan, a cricket star-turned-politician, led the Billion Tree Tsunami effort in the province, where his Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf party governs.

The Billion Tree Tsunami not only made good on a previous pledge to the Bonn Challenge — an initiative launched by IUCN to “restore 150 million hectares of degraded and deforested land worldwide by 2020, and 350 million hectares by 2030” — but also generated jobs at local tree nurseries, according to the World Economic Forum report.

Read More: Ben & Jerry's Wants to Plant Trees for Every Ice Cream Cone Sold

All of this bodes well for Pakistan, which was named one of the six countriesmost likely to be impacted by climate change by the United Nations in 2017.

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GIRLS & WOMEN

India's First Women-Run Train Station Is Shattering Stereotypes

These women are pushing back on workplace stereotypes and setting an example.

train_station_women_trf.png__1264x568_q85_crop_subsampling-2.png
A woman cleaner at India's first railway station run by all women in Gandhi Nagar of western Rajasthan state, September 10, 2018.
Thomson Reuters Foundation/Annie Banerji

By Annie Banerji

JAIPUR, India Oct 15 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) — As Chandra Kala heard the blaring horns of a train, she quickened her pace, zig-zagged and elbowed across a teeming platform while hauling a sack of wheat, a suitcase and a backpack.

She placed the luggage inside a carriage just as the train began to chug out of Gandhi Nagar railway station, which in February became India's only major terminal where women run the show.

Kala is a rare female porter in the conservative, desert state of Rajasthan in western India, and one of about 40 women holding positions traditionally held by men.

"Earlier, I used to feel very shy," said Kala, a widow with two children. "How should I speak to passengers, how can I lift luggage? It all felt very weird."

She had taken over her husband's porter job when he passed away last year, and she now supports her children from her earnings of about 3,000 rupees ($40) a week.

"It does not feel weird any more," said Kala. "It feels really good."

From ticket sellers and conductors, to station managers and cleaners, these trailblazers are upending sexist views and providing hope in a country where women are slowly vanishing from the workplace.

Take Action: Urge Leaders to Step up For Women’s Rights and Health

Take Action: Email Now

 
 
 
 
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In partnership with: SheDecides

India is one of the world's fastest growing major economies but the rate of female employment is startlingly low, in large part due to social prejudices and general disapproval of working women.

At least 20 million women — the combined population of New York, London and Paris — have left the workforce of Asia's third-largest economy since 2005, World Bank data shows, with only 27% now employed.

The Gandhi Nagar initiative is part of efforts by the state-run railway — India's biggest employer — to empower women in its workforce of 1.3 million people.

Indian Railways officials are planning to replicate the all-women staff model in other stations, according to Tarun Jain, a spokesman for the railways ministry.

The experiment has also created a financial windfall, according to Jain, who said Nagar station has experienced "record earnings" since women took over.

"The revenues have grown substantially as far as the ticket checking is concerned," he said. "They have caught a lot of people without tickets."

In April, the women caught 520 people attempting to ride trains or access platforms without tickets, according to data Jain provided. The station earned 133,595 rupees ($1,805) from the tickets those people then had to purchase.

In contrast, men apprehended 64 people without tickets during the same month in 2017, netting the station 11,645 rupees, according to the data.

Aya Matsuura, a gender specialist at the UN's International Labor Organization, said such initiatives are important in fighting gender stereotypes and to help "women find the confidence to enter traditionally male-dominated sectors".

"This also sends out a positive message to the younger generation when they consider career options," she said.

HAPPY PASSENGERS

Each year, millions of tourists flock to ancient fortresses and camel-back desert safaris in Rajasthan, which is also home to some of India's poorest villages where age-old customs like purdah, or veiling, often dictate a woman's life.

At Gandhi Nagar station in the state capital of Jaipur, 25 trains pass through every day with about 7,000 commuters — mostly from conservative rural and tribal areas — witnessing women carrying out jobs many have only seen men do before.

Bewildered, surprised and even upset, many gawked at the women when they first took over the station and often undermined their authority, asking for a "male manager", according to Neelam Sharma, a reservation supervisor.

"Some people reacted quite angrily," said Sharma, adding that passengers would say things like, "We do not know how any work will get done here."

However, as the months rolled by, Sharma said commuters were pleased to see improvements at the station, including faster service, smaller queues, better information and cleanliness.

india woman TRF train station.JPGNeelam Sharma, reservation supervisor, sells tickets to customers at India's first railway station run by all women in Gandhi Nagar of western Rajasthan state, September 10, 2018.
Image: Thomson Reuters Foundation/Annie Banerji

"Now those same people come to us and really appreciate us and say things like, 'Madam, we really like coming here, our work gets done quicker', and, 'The men did not explain things to us properly,'" Sharma said.

"Passengers are quite happy now."

Satya Narayan, a 61-year-old man who has been regular at the station since he was a little boy, agreed.

"There is a difference of night and day here," he said. "When the men were working here, there used to be a lot of hooliganism. But now the women are taking care of everything."

DOUBTS AND FEARS

Members of the team credit this success to their motivation to prove themselves in what is commonly considered a male bastion.

"(We) are giving our 100% efforts," said station master Angel Stella, sitting behind a control panel with colour-coded track lines and buttons that send signals to incoming trains in order to prevent accidents.

But it was not easy getting to this point, she said.

The women, who were mostly transferred from stations in smaller towns, had to overcome their own doubts and fears of running a station by themselves.

Read More: UN Says Saudi Arabia Must Free Women’s Rights Activists

They had to get comfortable working night shifts and working in positions of responsibility traditionally held by men, said Stella.

"We were scared and we thought, 'How will we do this?'"

It was also a challenge for those who lived with their children or in-laws to strike the balance between work and family, Stella added.

thomson reuters foundation women train station india.JPGChandra Kala, a woman porter, stands with a loaded luggage carrier at India's first railway station run by all women in Gandhi Nagar of western Rajasthan state, September 11, 2018.
Image: Thomson Reuters Foundation/Annie Banerji

To ensure their comfort and safety, authorities equipped the station with CCTV cameras, deployed an all-women police force, installed sanitary pad vending machines, and created a temporary daycare.

Female employees said they hope to inspire young girls passing through the station, and trigger a change among people who think a woman's place is at home.

"All women should come forward and stand shoulder to shoulder with men — especially in jobs that are usually seen as theirs," said Usha Mathur, a chief reservation supervisor and mother of two.

(Reporting by Annie Banerji @anniebanerji, Editing by Jared Ferrie ; Please credit the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of Thomson Reuters that covers humanitarian issues, conflicts, land and property rights, modern slavery and human trafficking, gender equality, climate change and resilience. Visit http://news.trust.org to see more stories)

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Dealing with a diagnosis

Hearing the news that your child has a learning disability can be a huge shock, and brings new emotions and challenges

Being told that your child has a learning disability can be a distressing experience. One of the biggest challenges is coming to terms with the fact that your child's future will be different to the way you imagined it.

You may feel disbelief, disappointment, self-pity, shock, anger, numbness, guilt and denial.

Some parents describe the period after diagnosis as a period of mourning, while others feel like it is like a bad dream, or that they are living in a bubble outside of reality.

Your emotions may vary wildly, and parents have told us that they were quite frightened by the feelings they had at this time. This is perfectly normal, and you are not alone.

Parents often blame themselves, or even one another, but it's important to remember no one is to blame.

When you receive a diagnosis, you will probably receive a lot of information all at once, and you may find this too much to take in. In fact, it may be weeks or even months before you feel able to find out more about your child's condition.

Digesting the information

Try to deal with the information piece by piece as you need it, and don't be afraid to ask the people working with your child to go back over anything you might have missed.

Some parents find that getting as much information as possible about their child's condition helps them to cope and plan for the future. Others find their emotions are enough to deal with, and prefer to get to know their child as an individual before finding out more about their learning disability.

It is also important to remember that, with time, your emotions will become easier to manage. Many parents have told us that after a diagnosis they discovered strength, determination and positivity that they didn't know they had.

The mixed emotions that follow a diagnosis can take a long time to come to terms with, so finding ways of coping are very important. Most importantly, don't forget yourself. Having family and friends to talk to at difficult times can help to relieve emotional stress. If you need a break from your caring responsibilities, you should contact your social worker or health visitor for advice and support.

"I'm pregnant - Down's syndrome diagnosis"

 

View a thread about diagnosis on FamilyHub from a user who's expecting her first child and has just received a diagnosis of Down's syndrome.

Hear her story and what advice and support some of our other users have offered.

 

View thread

How to get the support you need

Contact Mencap Direct, our advice and support helpline, for guidance and information about what support we can offer you.

Or why not take a look at FamilyHub? This is our online community for parents and family carers of people with a learning disability, and is a place for sharing experiences, advice and support.

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Christmas Gifts of Meaning 2764.png❤️

This Christmas, you can give a gift in a loved ones name or memory that will have a lasting and powerful impact of some of the world's most vulnerable children.

https://www.chernobyl-international.com/product/fix-a-heart/?fbclid=IwAR38Ku8QfNB9em_cbU9uOdZZanUAYL2VkP4drkXAc-u3njdVNkLQwaXVY7o

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Children with life-limiting conditions have complex needs including pain management and end-of-life care.

This Christmas, you can help provide quality loving care in a community or home environment during the precious years or months a child has left.

https://www.chernobyl-international.com/product/help-a-nurse/?fbclid=IwAR2NaScL-QQ9OANfe7anC1SUyGs0vZNU4FEzlB7L17rZHfXU6zrN4H1ISio

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133
AID AND DEVELOPMENT

Over one billion people lifted from extreme poverty since 1990

October 31 2018 | By: KEREZHI SEBANY

JOIN

Join the fight against extreme poverty

 
  

We’re closer than ever before to ending extreme poverty. In 1990, 36% of the world’s population was living on less than US$1.90 a day. By 2015, this figure had shrunk to just 10%. That’s over a billion people no longer living in extreme poverty!

Despite remarkable progress, the fight is far from over. The World Bank’s latest official poverty estimates show that poverty reduction has slowed down to less than half the rate it was. In 2015, 736 million people worldwide were still living on less than US$1.90 a day. If poverty reduction doesn’t happen faster, we may not end extreme poverty by 2030.

In 2015, more than half of those living in extreme poverty were in sub-Saharan Africa. That’s 413 million people, up from an estimated 278 million in 1990. Without urgent action, nearly 9 in 10 people living in extreme poverty are predicted to reside in sub-Saharan Africa by 2030.

Poverty is also on the rise in fragile and conflict-affected countries.. The proportion of people living in extreme poverty in these countries has been increasing since 2010. In 2015, nearly a quarter of all people living in extreme poverty were in these countries. Most of these countries are in Africa and face some of the most severe structural barriers to development.

How can we step up efforts to end extreme poverty? That was one of the main questions at the World Bank’s launch event to mark the release of the new poverty estimates. Jamie Drummond, ONE’s Co-Founder and Executive Director of Global Strategy, was straightforward: we need to increase investments in people, particularly young women.

We’ve come a long way, and we know how far we need to go to win this battle. In order to win, governments need to invest in people to grow economies. This won’t be easy, but it is possible. More importantly, it is necessary to create a world where everyone can thrive.

You can join the fight against extreme poverty by becoming a ONE member today!

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Why my son is the future of fighting malaria
5.4k

Why my son is the future of fighting malaria

25 April 2016 1:21PM UTC | By: GUEST BLOGGER

JOIN

Join the fight against extreme poverty

 
  

By Samuel Oduor Wangowe

This post is part of the PATH #ProtectingKids story roundup. Read all the stories here.

When my son Derrick was just nine months old, he suddenly became very ill. He started burning up, convulsing, vomiting. I knew all too well what it meant. They were the same symptoms I’d had more times than I could count. The same symptoms almost every family member and friend in my community had suffered. They were the symptoms of malaria.    

We rushed Derrick to the hospital that day, but by the time he got there, it was too late. I knew exactly what to look for, but it didn’t matter. Within two hours of his symptoms showing up, he was gone. 

Unfortunately, my family’s story is the story of so many families across Kenya and sub-Saharan Africa. It’s the same story I hear every day in my work as a community relations officer at the Kombewa Clinical Research Centre in Kisumu, Kenya.

Photo credit: Jordan Gantz Creative

Photo credit: Jordan Gantz Creative

I teach others about malaria—what it is, what the symptoms are, how to prevent it, and what to do if you have it. I speak with village chiefs, and opinion leaders.

I go to gatherings and funerals to educate the community about the correct way to use bed nets to protect from mosquito bites, and how to get rid of standing water and clear bushes, which encourage mosquitoes to gather. I tell them to come to the hospital if they suspect they have malaria, or if they need treatment.

Photo credit: Jordan Gantz Creative

Photo credit: Jordan Gantz Creative

I tell them about what happened to my son. But, as I learned with Derrick, sometimes all the knowledge and preparation in the world isn’t enough—the best weapon is prevention.

That’s why I also make sure members of my community know about opportunities to participate in some of the research studies my hospital conducts, including one for a malaria vaccine. There are centres like mine all across Africa working to develop a first vaccine for malaria.

Photo credit: Jordan Gantz Creative

Photo credit: Jordan Gantz Creative

I am heartbroken when I see children in my community with malaria. I remember my son and how he suffered. No parent should ever outlive their child, but it happens all the time.

Today, I have another son named Carl, who is almost two years old. In his short life, he’s already had malaria twice. I worry every time and I feel so powerless to help him.

Photo credit: Jordan Gantz Creative

Photo credit: Jordan Gantz Creative

But with Carl, I also have a lot of hope, because I know that someday soon, we might have a vaccine to protect him—adding another weapon to the fight against malaria. A weapon that would give us more power to stop this killer disease. I think Carl represents the future, not just for my family, but for my community, and other communities across Africa.

Samuel Oduor Wangowe is a community relations officer at the Kenya Medical Research Institute/Walter Reed Project in Kombewa (Kisumu), Kenya. His story does not represent the views of the Kenya Medical Research Institute/Walter Reed Project.

TAKE ACTION: Tell world leaders to support the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB, and Malaria!

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Christmas Gifts of Meaning 2764.png❤️

This Christmas, you can give a gift in a loved ones name or memory that will have a lasting and powerful impact of some of the world's most vulnerable children.

https://www.chernobyl-international.com/product/fix-a-heart/?fbclid=IwAR1uDVUIc2_mBGsaszNSSJgXHVxyuCHt3x-UoKK3OxyLOw6sMazaMHoQb_8

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JULY 13, 2018

 

10
 
ENVIRONMENT

Ireland Is the First Country in the World to Divest From Fossil Fuels

The nation will eliminate investments in all fossil fuels by 2025.


Why Global Citizens Should Care
States and countries around the world have to drastically reduce their greenhouse gas emissions to achieve the Paris climate agreement’s goal of keeping temperatures from rising more than 2 degrees Celsius compared to pre-industrial levels. Ireland’s commitment is a sign that the United Nations’ goal of a clean energy future is possible. You can take action on this issue here.

The Republic of Ireland will become the world’s first country to completely divest from fossil fuels, reports the Guardian.

A bill was passed this week with all-party support in the lower house of parliament to sell off all of the sovereign state’s investments in fossil fuel companies — including coal, oil, gas, and peat — as soon as possible, which is anticipated to be completed within five years.

Take Action: Take the Sustainable Seafood Pledge

 

“The [divestment] movement is highlighting the need to stop investing in the expansion of a global industry which must be brought into managed decline if catastrophic climate change is to be averted,” said Thomas Pringle, the independent member of parliament who introduced the bill, in the report. “Ireland by divesting is sending a clear message that the Irish public and the international community are ready to think and act beyond narrow short term vested interests.

The timing, some say, couldn’t be more prescient.

“Just last month Ireland was ranked the second-worst European country for climate action, so the passing of this bill is good news,” Éamonn Meehan, executive director of international development charity Trócaire, which pushed for the bill, told the Guardian. “But it has to mark a significant change of pace on the issue.”

Read More: Sweden Will Reach Its 2030 Renewable Energy Target This Year

 

Ireland's decision to divest from fossil fuels staggers me. It's one of the landmark moments in what has become the largest campaign of its kind in history. Such thanks to all who fought.

 
472 people are talking about this
 
 
 

 

The decision will effectively rid the European nation of holdings valued at more than $370 million, according to Trócaire, reported NPR.

According to the bill, a fossil fuel company is defined as any that derives 20% or more of its revenue from exploration, extraction, or refinement of fossil fuels, the Guardian reported. But the bill allows for future investment in Irish fossil fuel companies if they move toward renewable energy.

The announcement is the latest in a series of actions that illustrate Ireland’s desire to advance its climate stewardship. In 2015, Ireland successfully co-chaired complex negotiations on new sustainable development goals with the UN.

 

Looking forward, Ireland’s Global Footprint to 2025 outlined a high-level commitment to spend 0.7% of national income on development assistance by 2025.

"We must be very clear; people are dying today as a direct result of climate change through the increasingly frequent and intense disasters, through increased hunger, increased water scarcity," Pringle said in the NPR report, "and significantly more will die or be forced into displacement if there is not a radical change in direction."

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1 DE NOVIEMBRE DE 2018

 

3
 
MEDIO AMBIENTE

Esta bolsa de té es totalmente libre de plástico y está hecha en base a plátanos

Una de las compañías de té más grandes del Reino Unido.

Por qué los Global Citizens deberían preocuparse
La contaminación plástica está causando un gran daño a la naturaleza mundial. Los Objetivos Mundiales de las Naciones Unidas requieren acciones para proteger la vida en la tierra y bajo el agua, así como acciones para impulsar el consumo y la producción responsables. Puedes unirte a nosotros y tomar medidas aquí para ayudar a combatir los residuos plásticos. 

Una de las marcas de té más grandes de Gran Bretaña ha creado una nueva bolsa de té totalmente libre de plástico y hecha en base a bananas. 

 

Clipper Tea ha explicado que se trata del “primer papel para bolsas de té no modificado genéticamente, libre de plástico del mundo, no blanqueada del mundo”. Mientras que otras marcas, como el caso de PG Tips ya han producido sus primeras bolsas completamente biodegradables, el papel todavía se blanquea para que las bolsas se vean más brillantes. 

 

A pesar del progreso reciente, la mayoría de las bolsas de té del mundo aún contienen un plástico llamado polipropileno, un sellador que les ayuda a mantener su forma y evita que se caigan en la taza.

Actúa: Firma

 
 
 
1 punto

 



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Clipper ahora reemplazará este material con una mezcla hecha en base a plantas de banano, fibras de celulosa de la planta, y PLA, un biopolímero realizado de material vegetal según lo publicado por The Independent. 


Las nuevas bolsas también serán completamente compostables y biodegradables.

En su fábrica de Dorset, Clipper trasladó toda su línea de producción para deshacerse totalmente del plástico desde el 20 de octubre. Sin embargo, la compañía aclaró que aún podría tomar varios meses antes de que se agote la línea de productos actualmente en el mercado, por lo que el lanzamiento al mercado podría tomar un poco más de tiempo. 

 

 

PLASTIC-FREE ♻️

NON-GM 🌿

UNBLEACHED 💚

...now that's a Clipper tea bag! ☕️

Head over to our website to find out everything you need to know! 🙌

 
24 personas están hablando de esto
 
 
 

Este producto es importante, especialmente en Gran Bretaña, ya que allí se beben alrededor de 165 millones de tazas de té, más de 60 mil millones al año. 


Un informe publicado en 2010encontró que entre el 70 y 80% de las bolsas de té de los principales fabricantes son biodegradables. 

 

A nivel mundial, se estima que ya hay más de 150 millones de toneladas de plástico en los océanos, y que para 2050 habrá apróximadamente 2 mil millones de toneladas de plástico, el peso equivalente de un automóvil por cada ser humano en el planeta.

 

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CITIZENSHIP

JAY-Z Is Trying to Build a Movement to Change the World

Here’s how JAY-Z follows in the footsteps of Nelson Mandela.

Why Global Citizens Should Care
JAY-Z is a committed advocate and philanthropist, championing causes ranging from universal access to water to fairness in the US criminal justice system. You can join us in taking action on these issues here.

JAY-Z released his first album in 1996, and more than two decades later the hip-hop legend has entered an artistic and political renaissance, releasing in recent years some of his sharpest verses and building an empire of social justice along the way.

In 2016, he released the soul-searching 4:44, named for serendipitous moments in his life, and this past June he joined his wife Beyoncé for Everything is Love, a boastful, steely, and fun album that showed the two superstars at the height of their skills, mastering new sounds and techniques, and surveying their careers and relationship with the confidence of Marvel superheros.

While JAY-Z, whose given name is Shawn Carter, was busy exploring his inner life across dozens of songs, he was also furthering his philanthropic work and speaking out politically.

Take Action: Sign the Year of Mandela Declaration and Commit to Be the Generation to End Extreme Poverty

Take Action: Sign Now

 
 
 
2 points

 



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More often than not, his art and activism have been intertwined.

He released a short animated documentary in September 2016 through the New York Times, called “The War on Drugs Is an Epic Fail,” in which he describes the racist patterns of the criminal justice system.

Then he produced a miniseries on Kalief Browder, a man who was arrested at 16 on a false accusation and forced to spend more than 1,000 days in New York’s notorious Rikers Island prison, more than two years of which were in solitary confinement, which the United Nations considers a form of torture. Browder died by suicide a year after being released.

JAY-Z’s next venture, out this summer, is a miniseries that explores the murder of Trayvon Martin and the subsequent rise of the Black Lives Matter movement.

These productions are as much about clearing up disputed narratives as they are about informing people so that they can get involved and take action. As JAY-Z said in an interview with New York Times executive editor Dean Baquet, he can only do so much by himself. It’s when other people get involved, he said, that real change is possible.

Read More: Jay-Z Calls to End Mental Health Stigmas in Public Schools

“If we had a power base together, it would be a much different conversation than me having a conversation by myself and trying to change America by myself,” he told Baquet. “If I come with 40 million people, there's a different conversation, right?”

That’s similar to the purpose of Global Citizen, which aims to build a global movement to end extreme poverty and its many causes and consequences. In fact, Global Citizen counts JAY-Z as one of its biggest supporters. JAY-Z performed at both the 2014 Global Citizen Festival in New York and at the 2016 Global Citizen Festival in Mumbai, India.

Now he’s going to be performing in South Africa on Dec. 2 at the Global Citizen Festival Mandela 100, in proud partnership with the Motsepe Foundation.

But the hip-hop legend who grew up in Brooklyn public housing has been giving back for decades.

 

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'Good on Any MLK Boulevard'

The Shawn Carter Foundation was formed in 2003 to improve the opportunities of at-risk youth, and has since donated more than $4 million to community and scholarship programs.

Throughout his years touring, JAY-Z has often leveraged his shows to support people and causes. In 1999, the proceeds of a Denver show went to the families of the Columbine massacre victims. In 2001, he participated in “The Concert for New York City” to raise money for the victims of the 9/11 terror attack, and would later host a concert for the families of emergency service members who had died in the tragedy. The following year, he teamed up with Roc Nation for a show to raise funds for HIV prevention campaigns, the first of many HIV awareness efforts he would champion.

His “Fade to Black” concert in 2003 donated profits to various charities, and in 2006 JAY-Z partnered with the United Nations for the Water for Lifeconcert that brought in more than $300,000 for water and sanitation nonprofits, on top of a personal donation of $400,000 to PlayPump International.

That particular show marked JAY-Z’s growing interest in improving water access around the world, a cause he continues to support to this day. At the time, he traveled to various countries for the documentary Diary of JAY-Z: Water for Life, which aimed to raise awareness of the fact that hundreds of millions of people lack access to safe water.

 

Read More: Jay-Z Is Investing in a Company That Helps People Pay for Bail and Stay Out of Prison

Over the next decade, JAY-Z supported countless other charity concerts, such as participating in the Africa Rising Festival, donated millions to various causes, and continued his ongoing community outreach through efforts that included giving out presents and dinners in public housing.

Soon his efforts would become more political and focused on systemic change, signifying a shift toward that same type of movement building he spoke of in his interview with the Times.

In 2006, police fired 45 bullets at Sean Bell, killing the unarmed black man, whose family JAY-Z went on to support. JAY-Z grew up surrounded by police brutality and the incarceral excesses of the war on drugs, but the late 2000s and early 2010s were when the movement against these injustices began to reach a zeitgeist moment.

And JAY-Z was ready to play a leading role.

“In 1986, when I was coming of age, Ronald Reagan doubled down on the war on drugs, that had been started by Richard Nixon in 1971,” JAY-Z said in his New York Times animated documentary. “Forty-five years later it's time to rethink our policies and laws. The war on drugs is an epic fail.”

He has since called for an end to mass incarceration, police brutality, and predatory practices in impoverished communities. He’s called for bail reform, holding police officers accountable for violence, and expanded access to voting.

“It’s time we highlight the random ways people trapped in the criminal justice system are punished every day,” he wrote in a 2017 New York Times op-ed. “The system treats them as a danger to society, consistently monitors and follows them for any minor infraction — with the goal of putting them back in prison.”

In 2016, he donated $1.5 million to Black Lives Matter through a concert hosted by his streaming service Tidal.

 

Read More: Why It's a Crime to Be Poor in America

These efforts seem to be paying off. Prison and bail reform are increasingly mainstream ideas, with progressive attorneys general and judges being elected across the country.  (Global Citizen is currently campaigning to end cash bail. You can read more about it here).

Last year, JAY-Z directly helped families affected by unjust laws by bailing fathers out of jail for Father’s Day.

That was just one his charitable acts in 2017. He also organized concerts to help victims of Hurricanes Maria, Irma, and Harvey, and continued to uplift young people by sending a bunch of high schoolers to college, according to VH1.

Later this year, at the Global Citizen Festival Mandela 100, JAY-Z will honor one of the greatest humanitarians in recent history — Nelson Mandela. Like JAY-Z, Mandela’s interests were far-ranging, encompassing humans across the world, and ultimately aimed at achieving universal equality.

“We have a responsibility to push the conversation forward until we're all equal,” JAY-Z said in his Times interview. “Till we're all equal in this place. Because until everyone's free, no one's free, and that's just a fact.”

Those words sound a lot like Mandela’s, who famously said, “While poverty persists, there is no true freedom.”

Only a handful of people can be put in the same league as Mandela, but JAY-Z sure is following in his footsteps.


The Global Citizen Festival: Mandela 100 is presented and hosted by The Motsepe Foundation, with major partners House of Mandela, Johnson & Johnson, Cisco, Nedbank, Vodacom, Coca Cola Africa, Big Concerts, BMGF Goalkeepers, Eldridge Industries, and associate partners HP and Microsoft.

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This #CyberMonday don't forget to pick up DVDs and Books from the CCI archives including the Oscar Winning 'Chernobyl Heart' documentary, as well as the international acclaimed 'Black Wind, White Land'.

All proceeds go directly towards CCI's life-saving programmes.

Thank you!

https://www.chernobyl-international.com/donate/?fbclid=IwAR0VjayMetAjGj2Wf8MS2LIS3CyywjyWS7hx1kWuu1XWUhBsP6_DHz5uAWA

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