tan_lejos_tan_cerca

The Action Thread Part Two

Recommended Posts

 

Virgin Media News did a wonderful job capturing the electric atmosphere at Dublin Airport.

Our Voluntary CEO, Adi Roche, will catch up with the Ireland AM team tomorrow morning. Be sure to tune in from 07.45 tomorrow morning before Adi and our Rest and Recuperation group meet with President of Ireland / Uachtarán na hÉireann Michael D. Higgins at Áras an Uachtaráin.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

None of us are equal until all of us are equal.

 

 

A vital step toward women’s economic empowerment is making sure they have access to credit, loans and other financial tools. Read how countries like Zambia and the Democratic Republic of Congo are working to incorporate gender equality into their laws.

https://thepathtoequality.org/?linkId=61034625

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
221
GIRLS AND WOMEN

This entrepreneur is empowering her employees to think bigger and better

24 October 2018 4:47PM UTC | By: ABLE

JOIN

Join the fight against extreme poverty

 
  

In this series, we’re introducing you to strong and savvy female entrepreneurs from Ethiopia who have partnered with social enterprise and brand ABLE.

Furtuna Mario is in the rare position of being a woman and owning her own leather business in Ethiopia. Her professional success is testament to her deep motivation to improve conditions for those around her and evidence of an insatiable work ethic. In fact, that work ethic has earned her the nickname “The Iron Lady”, which she is lovingly and respectfully referred to by all who she works with through Fayda in Fashion.

itD0J10w.jpg“My dad and mom are very hardworking,” said Furtuna. “If they do something, they do it right. That was passed along to me and my siblings. We’re committed to our work and doing it right.”

Yet her determination is met equally with heart. Furtuna’s life’s motto is “Do good to all people.” She is quick to credit her success to the people who have supported, encouraged and believed in her, and she wants to do the same for others both in and outside the workplace.

CUgMcZXA.jpgGrowing up in Addis Ababa, the capital of Ethiopia, with three siblings, her father worked as a mechanic while her mother worked as a homemaker. Furtuna never dreamed of owning her own business, but even as a young girl, she knew she wanted to pursue an education and a career.

In a country where only 30% of college students are women, and 5% don’t return after the first year, Furtuna is an anomaly. She holds a degree in nursing and a second in child development. Upon graduation, she worked in a hospital and then for an adoption agency, where she’d come to meet Barrett Ward, the CEO of ABLE.

“I got the chance to work for ABLE as their country representative, and my eyes were opened to business,” said Furtuna. “First, my husband told me that I could run my own leather business and manage it well. We noticed demand was growing but supply wasn’t as quickly, so I thought I could open my own workshop and do it in a much bigger, professional way.”Oc-qftDA.jpgShe was also encouraged by other female entrepreneurs working in the leather industry in Ethiopia.

“Usually when people are working in the same kind of business, they don’t find the support from their peers. Those women, in particular, are special and kind. It’s a special instance.”

So Furtuna told the ABLE team she was leaving to start her own business, and ABLE became one of her first customers. In the early days, Furtuna, a fast learner, faced many challenges, like obstacles obtaining raw materials, training employees, meeting deadlines, and the general ins and outs of running her own business.

“It was scary at first because it was a risk for myself and others,” said Furtuna. “I kept thinking, ‘What if I hire them and the business doesn’t go well?’ But over time I came to learn that I could manage the business, and I built up confidence.”

s1e3YLcQ.jpgAmplifying the stress of starting her own business was the fact that Furtuna was also 2-months pregnant with her third child when she started Fayda in Fashion. However, her growing family only motivated her even further.

“Owning my own business feels liberating in the sense that I manage my own work, and I get to hire my employees myself,” said Furtuna. “It’s really liberating compared to working for someone else.”

MgffuDqQ.jpgCurrently, Fayda in Fashion employs 28 workers. Furtuna has applied what she’s learned about social impact from the ABLE team and is constantly working to keep the environment peaceful and empowering.

“One of the ways I’m keeping my employees motivated is paying a livable wage,” said Furtuna. “As they develop and gain new skills, we give them different responsibilities, and we encourage them through higher wages and promotions.”

N2m3eWKA.jpgFurtuna knows Ethiopia has a reputation for touting low wages as a way to attract foreign investment, and that’s one of the reasons she never anticipated owning her own business.

“I saw business owners pay low wages and get rich on the expense of their employees,” said Furtuna. “It gives me peace to pay living wages to my employees – peace that they have enough to eat, can afford transportation, and safe housing. I’m not profiting at the expense of their labour, and they’re earning a wage worth the work they put in here.”

OT2iZD7g.jpgFurtuna is also investing in training for her employees and wants them to think bigger and better for themselves.

“I want them to remember me as a person,” said Furtuna. “I have people I remember who encouraged me and pushed my limits. I am able to own my business because people saw a potential in me, and I want to do that for others.”

ABLE is publishing its lowest wages to protect and empower the fashion industry’s most vulnerable workers, most of whom are women. To provide consumers with complete transparency, all their partners must go through the rigorous and exhaustive ACCOUNTABLE assessment, evaluating their workplace’s equality, safety, wages and benefits, with a particular emphasis on women. To learn more about ABLE’s #PUBLISHYOURWAGES movement that inspires consumers to demand greater transparency of their favourite brands, visit www.livefashionable.com/publishyourwages.

ONE welcomes the contributions of guest bloggers but does not necessarily endorse the views, programs, or organisations highlighted.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
417
GIRLS AND WOMEN

Shaki’s boxing gym is making a big difference in Kampala

26 February 2018 12:33PM UTC | By: GUEST BLOGGER

JOIN

Join the fight against extreme poverty

 
  

Story and photos by David Meffe

Behind a heavy iron gate in central Kampala, a single-story brick bungalow is covered by adjoining panels of aluminium siding supported by trussed wooden beams. Inside the building, two clear panels in the ceiling allow some early morning sunshine into the room below.

Shakira Mohammad Mukungu‘s voice rings out over the sound of heavy breathing and the rhythmic thud-thud-thudding of a punching bag taking a beating. Framed on the wall, a faded charcoal sketch of Muhammad Ali looks on approvingly.

Meffe-Shaki-1-1024x617.jpg

Shakira — or Shaki, as she’s better known — has been the manager at East Coast Boxing Club for three years. In this environment, which feels more like a community centre than a traditional training gym, more than 40 young men ages 7 and older train here — some as often as twice a day. As each boxer enters the gym, they greet Shaki respectfully as “Big Mama,” an affectionate nickname she wears with pride. Thanks to hard work and small-scale entrepreneurship skills, Shaki has been able to use her background in counselling and passion for boxing to help motivate local youths.

“Some of these boys were stubborn,” she says. “Some were thieves. Most were just idle, maybe going to school or carrying boxes at the market. We encourage them to pick up trades or get back into school so they have options. Boxing can be a career if they’re talented, but it should have positive side-effects either way.”

Meffe-Shaki-2-1024x678.jpg

In addition to running the gym, Shaki leads an in-home boxing training program that pairs affluent clients around the city with the young boxers from her gym. While part of the revenue goes back into the gym, the rest goes to helping the young boxers earn money for school fees or to support their families.

Joshua Tukamuhebwa, 18, has been training with East Coast for seven years and is a national youth champion. “Out there, there’s always trouble. But in here, it’s all strength and focus,” he says.

In between time at the gym, he makes training house calls with Shaki, which he says helps him put money away for the future. “Training clients helps me earn while I get better.”

Meffe-Shaki-4-1024x645.jpg

When it comes to young people, boxers or not, Shaki considers discipline the key to a productive life. When she first opened the gym in the neighbourhood, locals were worried about teaching young people to fight. So East Coast started registering its boxers with the local police station. The rules are clear: If they’re caught getting into trouble with the law, they’re out.

“Boxing is one of the most disciplined sports,” she says. “Even if someone tries to start trouble with one of our boys on the street, our boys know to stay level-headed and think about the consequences.”

Shaki is the only female trainer at the gym, but she now trains three young women — the club’s first.

Shaki-trains-Latifah-1024x691.jpg

“Parents used to be afraid to send their daughters here with all these young gentlemen around,” she says. “But now the young sisters also come by, and they’re tougher than you can imagine.”

As East Coast becomes a pillar of the community, Shaki acts as a brick-and-mortar guiding force, keeping the youth in line and providing opportunities for growth far outside the walls of the gym.

Meffe-Shaki-7-1024x679.jpg

“So many youths in this neighbourhood are wasted,” she says, as she wipes sweat from her brow between rounds of training. “They have all this energy, but nowhere to let it out. East Coast keeps them away from crime, drugs, and prostitution.”

“This way, sport is more like therapy.”

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

La imagen puede contener: personas sentadas, sala de estar, tabla, árbol de Navidad e interior

La imagen puede contener: habitación e interior

La imagen puede contener: interior

Can you feel the magic of the merriest season of the year in our (ANDAZ)RED Suite? Imagine the feeling of staying in a luxurious suite that combines London’s storied culture with the opportunity to make positive social change.

When you book the #AndazRED Suite at Andaz London, a portion of the nightly room rate is donated to (RED)'s fight to #endAIDS.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

18/12/2018

Music Generation 2018: the year in pictures

Music Generation 2018: the year in pictures

Image: Michael O'Rourke

A lot can happen in a year! As 2018 draws to a close and festive spirit sets in we're thrilled to reflect on what has been another truly extraordinary year of music-making for Music Generation partnerships across Ireland.

It would be almost impossible to capture every magic moment of the past 12 months on camera. Friendships have been forged, ideas brought to life, new skills practiced and mastered. There have been moments of triumph, behind the door of a classroom, community hub or rehearsal space, as well as on grand stages in Ireland and overseas. Partners, parents, tutors and Music Generation teams have once again shown how incredible possibilities can be realised through their drive, commitment and innovation. There has been a whole lot of fun - and of course, there has been music.

Scroll through a small selection of shots that reflect the Music Generation 2018 year in pictures below... 

 
Music_Generation_Carlow._Photo_michaelor News_-_UPDATE_MG_Laois_Young_Ambassadors 2018_news_Rebel_Brass_Toy_Show_560x374_5 Rebel_Brass_perform_for_Michael_D_Higgin 01032018_-_News_-_MG_Cork_City_Music_Mas Tuned_In_2018_560x373_560_373_80_c1.jpg CommunitySingFestMay_560x373_560_373_80_ Edinburgh_tour_2018_560x373_560_373_80_c MG_Waterford_Summer_Sing_Out_560x373_560 Mayo_end_of_term_performance_2018_560x37 Allianz_Business2arts_560x373_560_373_80 national_musicians_day_2018_560x373_560_ music_at_mount_leinster_2018_560x373_560 Dean_Hollywood_SubSounds_end_of_term_con Pick_up_and_play_live_560x373_560_373_80 Sligo_Musical_Horizons_560x373_560_373_8

Bookmark and Share

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

18/12/2018

Music Generation 2018: the year in pictures

Music Generation 2018: the year in pictures

Image: Michael O'Rourke

A lot can happen in a year! As 2018 draws to a close and festive spirit sets in we're thrilled to reflect on what has been another truly extraordinary year of music-making for Music Generation partnerships across Ireland.

It would be almost impossible to capture every magic moment of the past 12 months on camera. Friendships have been forged, ideas brought to life, new skills practiced and mastered. There have been moments of triumph, behind the door of a classroom, community hub or rehearsal space, as well as on grand stages in Ireland and overseas. Partners, parents, tutors and Music Generation teams have once again shown how incredible possibilities can be realised through their drive, commitment and innovation. There has been a whole lot of fun - and of course, there has been music.

Scroll through a small selection of shots that reflect the Music Generation 2018 year in pictures below... 

 
Music_Generation_Carlow._Photo_michaelor News_-_UPDATE_MG_Laois_Young_Ambassadors 2018_news_Rebel_Brass_Toy_Show_560x374_5 Rebel_Brass_perform_for_Michael_D_Higgin 01032018_-_News_-_MG_Cork_City_Music_Mas Tuned_In_2018_560x373_560_373_80_c1.jpg CommunitySingFestMay_560x373_560_373_80_ Edinburgh_tour_2018_560x373_560_373_80_c MG_Waterford_Summer_Sing_Out_560x373_560 Mayo_end_of_term_performance_2018_560x37 Allianz_Business2arts_560x373_560_373_80 national_musicians_day_2018_560x373_560_ music_at_mount_leinster_2018_560x373_560 Dean_Hollywood_SubSounds_end_of_term_con Pick_up_and_play_live_560x373_560_373_80 Sligo_Musical_Horizons_560x373_560_373_8

Bookmark and Share

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you met our newest volunteers? 💓

No matter if you're a dog 🐶 or human 😃. Whatever your interest 🎨 or skill 🏃. You can give the gift of your time  this Christmas 🎄.

Volunteer and make a real difference to someone with a learning disability. ❤️

Visit: 🔔 https://bit.ly/2JfzcdY 🔔 #MencapVolunteering

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

President receives a group of people visiting Ireland through Chernobyl Children International

 Wed 19th Dec, 2018 | 14:30
 
 location: Áras an Uachtaráin
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
marker-pin.svg
vt?pb=!1m5!1m4!1i13!2i3951!3i2654!4i256!
vt?pb=!1m5!1m4!1i13!2i3951!3i2655!4i256!
vt?pb=!1m5!1m4!1i13!2i3952!3i2654!4i256!
vt?pb=!1m5!1m4!1i13!2i3952!3i2655!4i256!

 

 
 
marker-pin.svg
 
google_white5.png
 
 
Mapa
Satélite
President receives a group of people visiting Ireland through Chernobyl Children International

President Higgins welcomed a group of children and young adults from Chernobyl to Áras an Uachtaráin.

The visit to the home of the President took place less than 24 hours after the group will have arrived into Dublin Airport for a health-boosting Rest and Recuperation visit with the Chernobyl Children International charity. 

President Higgins was the first world leader to offer his support to the ‘United Nations Chernobyl Disaster Remembrance Day’, which was initiated following Adi Roche’s address to the United Nations General Assembly on the 30th Anniversary of the Chernobyl accident in 2016. 

In a letter of support for the inaugural commemoration, President Higgins stated that “Adi Roche’s Chernobyl Children International has become a world leader in supporting and advocating for the children who were affected by the Chernobyl disaster across the stricken regions.”

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2
REFUGEES

Displaced people in Niger will now be protected by a new law

11 December 2018 5:06PM UTC | By: THOMSON REUTERS FOUNDATION

JOIN

Join the fight against extreme poverty

 
  
This story was originally reported by Nellie Peyton and edited by Claire Cozens for the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

Niger has adopted Africa’s first national law for the protection and assistance of people fleeing violence, floods and droughts, the government and United Nations said on Thursday.

The government says there are about 174,000 displaced people in the West African country, mostly in regions where Islamist violence has spilled over from Mali and Nigeria.

That figure excludes others who were forced to leave their homes to search for grazing land or water, said Lawan Magagi, Niger’s minister of humanitarian action and disaster management.

“The question of sustainable solutions has really guided us … because internal displacement in Niger is becoming more and more recurrent,” Magagi told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

This is due to both climate change and conflicts in neighbouring countries that affect border communities, he said.

The new law was approved unanimously by the national assembly on Monday, Magagi said.

It is based on the Kampala Convention, a 2009 African Union treaty that establishes guiding principles for protection of internally displaced persons (IDPs).

Other African countries have ratified the Kampala Convention, but not incorporated it into national law, according to the U.N. Refugee Agency (UNHCR).

“Niger continues to inspire and show its solidarity and generosity towards those forced to flee,” said Alessandra Morelli, UNHCR representative in Niger.

Magagi said the law would allow for a national fund to help IDPs and increase penalties for assaults on them.

The state will also play a bigger role in preventing land disputes when people are forced to move, and will help them return home if the situation has improved, he said.

“In general, it’s refugees who are supported most by partners. But the population of a country that flees within the country doesn’t have access to as much assistance,” he said.

Niger hosts about 176,000 refugees, mostly from the part of Nigeria battling Boko Haram, according to UNHCR.

The country has also opened its doors to vulnerable refugees and asylum seekers imprisoned in Libya while trying to reach Europe.

The United Nations has evacuated more than 2,000 of them to Niger so far, where they are being processed for resettlement in other countries.
ONE welcomes the contributions of guest bloggers but does not necessarily endorse the views, programs, or organisations highlighted.
(Images via United Nations.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

HEALTH

Expensive US Health Care Isn't Adequate for Women, Study Finds

The US had higher maternal mortality rates and more women with chronic health issues.


Why Global Citizens Should Care
 About 40% of women in the United States have been forced to forgo medical care because of their high cost. Affordable medical care is key to keeping communities healthy and combating poverty. You can take action here to support equal access to health care for all. 

Despite paying more for health care, American women are less healthy, more likely to die in pregnancy, and have higher rates of emotional distress than women in other wealthy countries, a new study from the Commonwealth Fund says.

The new study, released on Wednesday, shows how far behind other wealthy nations the United States is when it comes to health care. Researchers compared health data for women in 11 wealthy, developed countries — the US, Canada, Germany, Australia, France, Norway, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Sweden, Switzerland, and the UK. The study found that despite higher health care costs, women in the US have worse health outcomes than women in the other 10 countries examined.

Take Action: Tweet at the Prime Minister of Ethiopia to Increase Domestic Health Spending and Prioritize UHC

Actúa: Tweet Now

 
 
 
2 puntos

 



United StatesUnited KingdomGermanyCanadaAustraliaAfghanistanÅland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBruneiBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCabo VerdeCambodiaCameroonCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo (the Democratic Republic of the)Cook IslandsCosta RicaCôte d'IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands  [Malvinas]Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambia (The)GeorgiaGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuamGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and McDonald IslandsHoly See  [Vatican City State]HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIranIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKuwaitKyrgyzstanLaosLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedoniaMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMicronesia (the Federated States of)MoldoviaMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorth KoreaNorthern Mariana IslandsNorwayOmanPakistanPalauPalestine, State ofPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarRéunionRomaniaRussiaRwandaSaint BarthélemySaint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth KoreaSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyriaTaiwanTajikistanTanzaniaThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited States Minor Outlying IslandsUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuelaVietnamVirgin Islands (British)Virgin Islands (U.S.)Wallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabwe

 

 

En asociación con: Johnson & Johnson

The study intended to measure the impact of the 2010 Affordable Care Act on women’s health, according to Sara Collins, vice president for health care coverage and access at the Commonwealth Fund, who helped create the report.

“We wanted to take an assessment of where women are on healthcare and, particularly, insurance coverage. Women are indisputably in a better place than they were in 2009,” Collins told NBC News

Approximately 16% of Americans did not have health insurance in 2009. Nearly 10 years later, only 8.8% lack coverage, NBC News reports. But while access to health care has improved, the US still has a long way to go. 

The US is the the only country out of the 11 studied that does not have universal health care coverage. The 10 other countries included in the study all have national health insurance systems or laws that require everyone to have health insurance.

A federal health care spending report shows that the US spends $10,739 per person on health care, which is more than any other country in the world and almost double the average cost per person for developed countries. Approximately 40% of American women have forgone medical treatment  because of high costs. This is significantly higher than  the other countries examined in the study; only 5% of women in the UK said they skipped medical care due to costs.

 

 

A new study comparing U.S. women’s health care experiences with those of women in 10 other high-income countries found that U.S. women were more likely to report problems paying or disputing medical bills or spending time on related paperwork. https://buff.ly/2Cmu7vX 

 
 
 
 

 


Read More: 5 Reasons we all must have universal health coverage

The report showed that 1 in 5 American women said they have two or more chronic conditions, including asthma, arthritis, diabetes, heart disease, and high blood pressure — double the amount reported by women in Australia, Germany, and the Netherlands. 

American women’s mental health has also suffered. About 34% of the women studied reported experienced emotional distress, higher than any other country studied, which in turn can negatively impact physical health.

In addition to this, women in the US pay more money during pregnancy to other high-income countries, yet suffer the highest maternal mortality rate of the countries studied. Both vaginal deliveries and caesarian sections in the US cost about double the price of the same procedures in Australia, according to the report

The US also has the third highest rate of caesarean sections with 320 per 1,000 births. This is second to Australia and Switzerland. Caesarean births are often more expensive because of the cost of the operating room, medical personnel, and hospital stay during the extended recovery time.

In the US, 14 in every 100,000 women die from childbirth-related causes, according to UNICEF. In comparison, Sweden, the country with the lowest maternal mortality rate in the study, has just four deaths per 100,000 births.

 

 

U.S. women are more likely to die in pregnancy and childbirth and to skip care because of costs, a study of high-income nations finds. https://buff.ly/2Cmu7vX 

 
 
 
 

 

According to a report last year from the CDC, at least half of all pregnancy-related deaths are preventable.

Read More: This Mom Died Delivering Her Child After Waiting Seven Hours for Medical Care

The one area in which the researchers noted that American women had strong health outcomes was breast cancer prevention. Women in the US had some of the highest breast cancer screening rates and were less likely to die of breast cancer than other countries according to the report, but on the whole, women in the US reported being highly dissatisfied with their medical care.

Out of the countries studied, American women were the least likely to rate their health care quality as “excelled or very “good,” with only 25% satisfiedwith health conditions.  

Collins said that expanding Medicaid without restrictions that limit enrollment and providing federal support to help people manage health insurance premiums could help to improve the country’s health overall.

“There is just a long list of small changes that could be made to the ACA [Affordable Care Act],” said Collins. “We don’t need to throw out the law and start again. There are small, relatively low-cost changes that Congress could tackle.”

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DEC. 20, 2018

 

 
 
FOOD & HUNGER

Food Shortages and Corruption Spark Protests in Northeast Sudan

Around 80% of Sudan’s population cannot afford enough food.

Why Global Citizens Should Care
Corruption and conflict exacerbate the challenges people living in poverty around the world are facing. Protesters in northeast Sudan are demanding change in response to rising food prices. Join us in taking action here to ensure all people can access food, clean water, and the essential services they need to thrive.

Thousands of people took to the streets of Atbara city in northeast Sudan on Thursday to protest rising food prices and corruption, Reuters reports.

The demonstration began on Wednesday with protesters peacefully chanting, speaking out against corruption, and calling for accountability from the government.

The initial protesters were joined by hundreds more people on Thursday after the Sudanese government declared a state of emergency in response to the protest and set a citywide curfew in Atbara.

As the mass of protesters grew, the demonstrations turned violent with some attendees setting tires on fire, Reuters reports.

Take Action: Urge Zambia to Help Children Live Free From Hunger and Malnutrition

Actúa: Sign Now

 
 
 
2 puntos

 



United StatesUnited KingdomGermanyCanadaAustraliaAfghanistanÅland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBruneiBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCabo VerdeCambodiaCameroonCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo (the Democratic Republic of the)Cook IslandsCosta RicaCôte d'IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands  [Malvinas]Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambia (The)GeorgiaGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuamGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and McDonald IslandsHoly See  [Vatican City State]HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIranIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKuwaitKyrgyzstanLaosLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedoniaMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMicronesia (the Federated States of)MoldoviaMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorth KoreaNorthern Mariana IslandsNorwayOmanPakistanPalauPalestine, State ofPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarRéunionRomaniaRussiaRwandaSaint BarthélemySaint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth KoreaSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyriaTaiwanTajikistanTanzaniaThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited States Minor Outlying IslandsUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuelaVietnamVirgin Islands (British)Virgin Islands (U.S.)Wallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabwe

 

 

"I went out to protest because life has stopped in Atbara," a 36-year-old man who had participated in Wednesday's demonstration told Reuters.

"Prices have increased and I have still not been able to withdraw my November salary ... because of the liquidity crisis. These are difficult conditions that we can't live with, and the government doesn't care about us," he said.

 

High school students in the city of Nuhud in North Kordofan state in western #Sudan are sweeping the streets by protesting against the collapse of economic conditions

 
 
 
 

In Sudan, ongoing conflict and government corruption have come at the expense of everyday citizens' human rights —especially those living in poverty. Food insecurity is a major problem faced by many throughout the country. Around 80% of people in Sudan cannot afford the food they need day to day and nearly 40% are malnourished, according to the World Food Programme. More than 2 million children under the age of 5 suffer from stunting as a result of malnutrition, according to UNICEF.

Read More: This Man Restored 240 Million Trees in West Africa — and They Could Help Fight Hunger

Inflation in Sudan has reached 69%, devaluing their currency. Bread prices have more than tripled since the beginning of 2018, after the government decided to stop importing wheat from overseas, Al Jazeera reports. As a result, people can be seen waiting in long lines outside of bakeries to buy bread.

The country's economic situation has taken a serious toll on its, who have been through civil war and, in recent months, have struggled with corruption along with fuel and food shortages.

Much of Sudan's economic hardship has stemmed from its civil war, which caused widespread displacement and destruction, and ended with the secession of South Sudan in 2011. As a result, the Northern part of the country lost more than 75% of its oil reserves, a major source of revenue. Humanitarian crisis in both the north and south continue to put lives at risk.

While thousands gathered in Atbara — the historical center of anti-government protests in Sudan — it's not the only place Sudanese people gathered to express their frustrations. People also voiced their anger through protests in the cities of Dongola, Sennar, al-Qadarif, and the capital of Khartoum, Reuters reports.

While all the protests began peacefully, vandalism and violence has ensued, leaving at least one person dead in the city of al-Qadarif, Al Jazeera reports.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.