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The Action Thread Part Two

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La imagen puede contener: 1 persona, sonriendo, de pie y traje

"Thank you Queen...for ensuring that authenticity and inclusivity exists in the music, in the world, and in all of us.” 

🏆 Congrats to (RED) ambassador Rami Malek for winning Best Actor in a Motion Picture-Drama at last night's #GoldenGlobe Awards!

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KEEP AN EYE ON

The young African innovators to watch in 2019

By Yomi KazeemJanuary 3, 2019

In covering the continent, Quartz Africa pays keen attention to innovators on and from the continent who are breaking barriers. That thinking has informed an annual compilation of Quartz Africa Innovators lists in 2015, 2016, 2017 and 2018. Here’s a teaser of just a few of the most exciting young talent we’re keeping an eye on in 2019, they are all breaking ground in their respective fields and they’re are all under 30.

Sarah Diouf (Senegal)

In 2016, Sarah Diouf’s mission in starting Tongoro, a Dakar-based ready-to-wear fashion brand, was to fill a gap by offering an affordable African label in a market dominated by foreign brands. With a range of African print-based blouses, skirts and a popular Mburu handbag, Diouf, 29, is well on her way. After breaking even in the first year largely thanks to a strong customer base in the United Statesincluding Beyonceand the United Kingdom, Tongoro is looking to increase its footprint in major African cities. Tongoro also prides itself on being a wholly made in Africa fashion label, sourcing its materials across the continent and contracting local tailors.

Betelhem Dessie (Ethiopia)

In a tech space where excelling teenagers and women are both a rarity in Ethiopia, Betelhem stands out. Working with iCog, a robotics and artificial intelligence laboratory based in Addis Ababa, the 19 year-old Ethiopian is leading the charge to make artificial intelligence innovation and coding more mainstream among young Ethiopians. Betelhem leads several projects including Anyone Can Code, focused on teaching pupils aged between six and 13 the basics of artificial intelligence as well as Solve IT, a project that pushes teenagers to develop tech-based solutions to problems in their community. As she told Quartz Africa last year, “You have to be smarter than the machines that you’re using.”

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AFROBYTES
Betelhem Dessie speaking at Afrobytes Paris

Kelvin Doe (Sierra Leone)

Kelvin Doe’s early age curiosity for tinkering with electronics and electrical parts from scrapyards in his native Sierra Leone saw him go from being a self-taught engineer to becoming the youngest personto participate in the Visiting Practitioner’s Program at Massachusetts Institute of Technology and giving TEDx speeches. The 22-year old prodigy has grown in leaps and bounds since and has founded K-Doe Tech, a startup working on solar energy inventions. Doe also continues to support young people in Sierra Leone, providing educational resources and tools as well as hosting workshops.

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Kelvin Doe speaking at TedxTeen in 2012

Silas Adekunle (Nigeria/US)

Silas Adekunle’s profile has risen rapidly over the past year thanks to a robot uprising of his own making. With a first-class degree in Robotics from the University of West England, the Lagos-born engineer founded Reach Robotics and is a pioneer in gaming robots. The robots have proven big enough to snag an exclusive sales deal with Apple stores and have seen Reach Robotics secure $10 million in funding. It’s a far cry from when Adekunle, 27, was causing power outages while tinkering with batteries while growing up in Nigeria.

Elvis Chidera (Nigeria)

A lack of required resources is not always a hindrance, as Elvis Chidera, 19, proves. The self-taught software engineer learned on how to code on a feature phone with very limited functions while growing up in eastern Nigeria. These days however, Chidera is working with dot Learn, a MIT-backed startup focused  on easing access to online education by providing data-lite resources. Education is clearly a passion for the teenager who has also built PrepApp, an exam preparation app for students which has been installed over 35,000 times.

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Do you know what advocacy is? 
Advocacy is a fancy word for supporting people to speak for themselves. 💬 
It isn't about speaking on behalf of someone. 🚫 
It is ensuring that a person's own voice is heard.  
Find out more: https://bit.ly/2D58Iso

 

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La imagen puede contener: una o varias personas

Many of the children in our 'Homes of Hope' programme come from difficult beginnings but with CCI’s help and intervention face brighter futures. One such boy is Daniil*.

Danill* was not even three years old when he arrived at a CCI Home of Hope. Very nervous and scared, he would cry and cry at the slightest sound. His transition to the ‘Home of Hope’ was made easier by the fact his sister and brother were already at the home before him. The children had previously lived with their alcoholic mother and her abusive partner. The children were completely neglected and had lived on potato peelings from their neighbours bins. They suffered ongoing physical abuse from their mother’s partner, as did their mother. She was frequently assaulted in front of her children. She tried to leave but without supports structures around her was unable and she attempted suicide.

Fortunately, CCI’s team intervened and discovered her in time. For years after Daniil* traumatic start in life he struggled and while he can still be a little nervous, he is a lot more content and well settled into his new family and is thriving with their love and support. He is now able to reach his fullest potential through social integration and loving, supportive care.

Daniil’s older sister Petra* is now studying in Art College. His brother Ivan* is studying to be a builder and he and Petra come home as often as they can to visit their youngest sibling.

*The names of the children have been changed to protect their privacy and the privacy of their family.

To support this programme please go to http://www.chernobyl-international.com/donate/
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La imagen puede contener: 4 personas, personas sonriendo, personas sentadas y exterior

Almost thirty-two years after the world’s worst nuclear disaster it is important to remember the millions of people who continue to suffer the after effects of that fateful day. The most shocking consequences are genetic and these genetic effects are passed down through generations.

Children born with mental and physical disabilities and are often abandoned to state institutions by families who cannot cope. These children need our help.

For over three decades, CCI has led the world’s response to the plight of these children. We must, for them and for ourselves, show compassion in every way we can. We cannot ignore or turn away from them. It is our responsibility to speak out, to tell the truth and advocate for those who have been rendered silent, invisible and powerless.

Image: Paul Fusco
www.chernobyl-international.com
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La imagen puede contener: 1 persona, niños, exterior e interior

“SOS appeal. For god’s sake, help us to get the children out.”

This desperate appeal, made by Belarusian and Ukrainian doctors, was sent by fax and received by our founder Adi Roche, in January 1991. The message was simple and to the point, begging someone—anyone—to take the children away from Chernobyl’s radioactive environment so that their bodies had some chance of recovery.

In 1991 Adi formally founded the organisation on receipt of this desperate fax. By the following summer she had coordinated the first group of Chernobyl children to arrive in Ireland for recuperative holidays. Soon after she formed CCI in an effort to help alleviate the suffering and offer hope to the children of Chernobyl.

This year for the third time, the Naciones Unidas will call on countries all over the world to commemorate the inaugural ‘International Chernobyl Disaster Remembrance Day’ on April 26th. This call for commemoration came as a direct result of Adi Roche’s appeal to the General Assembly on the 30th Anniversary of the disaster in April 2016.
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I have a master's degree in Nonprofit Management and am trying to start up my own organization to help tackle the rising crisis of student debt. With that being said, I regularly access websites such as GuideStar and charity navigator (very useful for those wishing to get involved with organizations but don't know their credibility) among others. I just wanted to drop this infographic here to show how much of a difference advocacy and donating to causes can make - and has made in 2018 alone. This is just for the U.S.

 

GUSA-2018-Infographic-FINAL-1024x768@2x.thumb.png.0910624b702157c439945d99147b109e.png

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52
HIV/AIDS

Halima: “I dream of an HIV-free generation.”

5 December 2018 3:25PM UTC | By: THOMSON REUTERS FOUNDATION

SIGN THE PLEDGE

Sign the pledge: We’ll do whatever it takes to end AIDS

 
  

This story was originally reported by Halima Abdullahi* for the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

“Did you say you were married before?”

“You’re a widow?”

“And you’re just eighteen years old?”

The doctor asked all these questions in one breath, but I could not answer him. I was trembling. God, let this not be what I thinking. I had walked into the doctor’s office with an employer’s letter and excitement. HIV and other medical tests are routine parts of the employment background check process in Nigeria, and I was a step closer to my dream of saving enough money to go to university.

“You are HIV positive, but it’s okay!” The doctor said, after a long pause. At that moment, I could feel my life crumbling. NO, it is not okay doctor! I felt a sharp pain in my heart and my legs became stiff. I couldn’t move. I cursed the family and culture I was born into.

I was 15 years-old when I got married. I am from Northeastern Nigeria where it is not uncommon for girls to be married. I do not remember much about my wedding rites, except being unhappy. Many times before my wedding day, I begged my father to let me complete my education. I told him if I went to school I could better his life someday, but he refused. I was forced to marry a man who had a daughter older than me.

Life happened very fast after I got married. Within a year I got pregnant, my husband got very ill, I miscarried my twins and my husband died. Many memories from that traumatic chapter of my life have disappeared, but the memory of losing my twins remains vivid. I would later learn that in the community I am from, there is a myth that men who have HIV/AIDs can be cured by having sex with virgins.

Immediately after my husband’s funeral, I ran away from my home with a little money that had been given to me as a gift during the funeral greetings. I was scared that if I stayed, I would be married off to someone else. I was able to find work in a neighbouring state washing plates for a woman who sold food. In lieu of a salary, I asked to be enrolled in a school and was able to complete secondary school. That day in the doctor’s office, I felt like all my suffering had been in vain.

It’s been ten years since I was first diagnosed with HIV. I have been depressed many times, but education was my escape. Today I am a graduate, I work at a think-tank, and I am the breadwinner of my family.

Today, World AIDS Day, 900 young women in Africa will catch HIV, and over two thousand people will die of this killer. I dream of an HIV-free generation and an end to child marriage. I never tell anyone about my status because there is so much judgment around morality that comes with being HIV positive in Nigeria, but my dream is to tell the world my story one day. Maybe one person will be inspired.

*Name has been changed for privacy.
ONE welcomes the contributions of guest bloggers but does not necessarily endorse the views, programs, or organisations highlighted.

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39
HEALTH

We have a chance to save 16 million lives

11 January 2019 4:41PM UTC | By: MELANIE RHODES

JOIN

Join the fight against extreme poverty

 
  

The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria has helped save 27 million lives since its creation in 2002. That’s 27 million people who can live, work, attend school, and contribute to their communities without the burden of HIV, tuberculosis (TB), and malaria!

We now know what is possible, but there is no room for complacency. The fact is, despite progress, a resurgence of these three epidemics is no longer just a threat, it’s a reality. We need to revive the energy that has driven so much progress so far because the stakes today are higher than ever.

Bono, lead singer of U2 and co-founder of The ONE Campaign and (RED), said: “We’re at a dangerous point in the journey to end AIDS, TB and malaria. Complacency is setting in. Some people think these diseases are in the rear-view mirror, but not the 7,000 people who will die from them today, or their families.”

A fight we can win

The Global Fund — a partnership between governments, civil society, the private sector and people affected by the diseases — supports programs run by local experts in countries and communities that need it the most. It is one of the most effective organisations fighting AIDS, TB and malaria, and it is crucial that it gets the money it needs.

In October 2019, the Global Fund will host a meeting in France to raise new funds and mobilize partners – known as a replenishment. The Fund just announced that it is seeking US$14 billion to continue its life-saving work for the next three years. If it meets this goal, the Fund could help save 16 million lives between 2021 – 2023.  

Gayle Smith, CEO and President of ONE, said: “Today alone, nearly a thousand young women will contract HIV. Neither we nor the millions of women and girls at risk can afford to be complacent in this fight against destructive diseases. Leaders from all over the world, from governments and opposition, have joined forces over the last 15 years to score victories in the fight against this epidemic – we know what to do, we need to do more, and we need to do it now.”

A fight we will win

Before the Global Fund, AIDS, TB and malaria appeared to be unstoppable. In many countries, AIDS devastated an entire generation, leaving countless orphans and shattered communities. Malaria killed young children and pregnant women unable to protect themselves from mosquitoes or access life-saving medicine. TB unfairly afflicted people living in poverty. But, the world fought back and millions of lives have been saved.

We now need the financial and political commitments to keep up the fight, and win!

You can help make that happen by becoming a ONE member and joining the fight against extreme poverty and preventable diseases.

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Women-in-tech-website-feature-image-1.pn

5 AFRICAN WOMEN WHO SHOULD HAVE BEEN ON THE 2018 FORBES POWER WOMEN LIST

 

Every year, Forbes publishes its list titled: ‘The World’s 100 Most Powerful Women’. The women on this list are some of the most intelligent, resilient and influential leaders of today. Making their mark in the world in all fields including politics, business, philanthropy, media, technology, and finance.

They are creating solutions for some of the world’s biggest problems and leaving lasting legacies along the way.

Members of the 2018 Most Powerful Women list represent women in six categories.: Business (27 honorees), technology (18), finance (12), media & entertainment (16), politics & policy (22), and philanthropy (5).

Combined, the ‘Power Women’ control or influence nearly $2 trillion in revenue and oversee 5 million employees.

While I know this list is highly competitive and the women on the list all deserve the honor, there is a serious problem when it comes to diversity.  

Only 1 African woman made the 2018 Forbes 100 power women list, at no 97. Why? Read more... - @lizgrossman87CLICK TO TWEET

Just look at the numbers: North America has 50 women represented, Asia and the Pacific has 22, Europe has 24, (with the United Kingdom boasting 7 from that number), the Middle East has 3,  and only one in Africa – the newly minted President of Ethiopia Sahle-Work Zewde at position 97.

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Of course, picking the Power Women is no easy feat. Forbes uses four metrics every year:

  1. Money – net worth, company revenues, assets, or GDP
  2. Traditional, digital and social media presence
  3. Spheres of influence
  4. Impact – analyzed both within the context of each woman’s field (media, technology, business, philanthropy/NGOs, politics, and finance) and outside of it.

Criteria number one, money, can place African women at a disadvantage. According to the IMF, in 2017 Nigeria had the largest nominal GDP of any African country at $376 billion, but ranks 30th globally, with most African countries trailing far behind.

The top ten African businesses range from $58 billion (Sonatrach) in revenue to $8 billion (Imperial Holdings), none of which have a female CEO.

Fortune’s top ten global companies range from over $500 billion (Walmart) to $242 billion (Berkshire Hathaway). These simple numbers and economic imbalance alone may explain why so few African women make it on the Power 100 list, but it is reductionist to define power in terms of money.

Power can be defined as the ability or right to control people and events or to influence the way people act or think in important ways.

 African women have historically been influential leaders, dating back to the 17th century with Queen Nzinga from Angola, through to the struggles for independence by women like Yaa Asaantewa, Rose Chibambo, Graça Machel, Winnie Mandela, Joice Mujuru, Lillian Ngoyi and Albertina Sisulu, to the modern historical figures such as former female Presidents Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Dr Joyce Banda, Ameenah Gurib Fakim and Catherine Samba Panza.

Businesswomen like Njeri Rionge from Kenya, Sibongile Sambo from South Africa are running multi-million dollar enterprises. We must also praise countries like Rwanda, for having the most number of women represented in parliament.

African women leaders are resilient, influential and changing their societies and the world. And they wield significant power.

Forbes has recognized African women on past lists, such as Folorunso Alakija, Dr. Joyce Banda, Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, Ameena Gurib Fakim, Gail Kelley (the only African woman to ever be named in the top 10, #8 of 2010), and others.

However this year, I would like to suggest five African women who should have been considered for the Power Women List.  

Here are 5 African Women who should have been on the 2018 Forbes Power Women List - @lizgrossman87CLICK TO TWEET

Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka 

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Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka is the United Nations Under-Secretary-General and Executive Director of UN Women, a position she has held since August 2013, expanding the agency to raise the most revenue in its history and provide financing for almost 50,000 beneficiaries globally.

She boasts over 83,000 followers on Twitter, speaking engagements on some of the world’s most influential stages, and sets the policy agenda for gender equality in the core of the United Nations.  

She uses her experiences as an active leader in the anti-apartheid struggle in South Africa, as well as serving in some of the highest positions of government, including Deputy President, to influence the lives of all women across the world.

Obiageli Ezekwesli 

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With a glowing career in civil society, government, policy-making, and advocacy, Obiageli Ezekwesli spearheaded the #BringBackourGirls Campaign, creating a global movement to insist on returning the Chibok Girls.

More than one million people, including the former First Lady of the United States, Michelle Obama have tweeted the hashtag.  HBO has recently released a documentary on two of the girls, which is a result of this campaign.

She was a 2018 nominee for the Nobel Peace Prize for her work in transparency in the extractive sector.  She is currently running for President of Nigeria and using her global platform to disrupt Nigeria’s politics of failure, as evidenced by her interview with CNN’s Christine Amanpour, and through a strategic campaign targeting young Nigerians.

Tsitsi Masiyiwa

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Tsitsi Masiyiwa is a Zimbabwean philanthropist and social entrepreneur who has devoted much of her life to empowering the lives of young people through education and technology.

She and her husband, billionaire Strive Masiyiwa, founded the Higher Life Foundation in response to the AIDS crisis, and now provide education, access to technology, and healthcare in Zimbabwe, South Africa, Burundi, and Lesotho.

Every year, the Higherlife Foundation provides 20,000 scholarships for African students and gives 600,000 students a month access to education through the Ruzivo online learning platform they developed.

Tsitsi is a sought after philanthropist and speaker, serving on boards such as the Global Philanthropy Forum, PATH, the Giving Fund, and the End Fund, where she uses her expertise to influence decisions about major philanthropic investments globally.

Amina J Mohammed

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Amina J Mohammed serves as the Deputy Secretary General of the United Nations,  the second in command of the entire UN system, with a budget of $5.4 billion.

After years in the private sector, Amina served in government under three Nigerian Presidents, including as Minister of the Environment,  before joining the United Nations as Ban Ki-Moon’s advisor on the post-2015 Development Agenda.

Sharing stages with major world leaders, she is working to better share the humanitarian work of the United Nations, and encourage reforms within the system, including on climate change, the Every Woman Every Child initiative, women’s health,  and developing future African political leaders through the African Women Leaders Network.  

Bozoma Saint John

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A top executive hailing from Ghana with a career spanning PepsiCo, Apple, Uber, and now Endeavor, Bozoma “Boz”  St John is disrupting music, pop culture and business as we know it.  

She was the mastermind behind Beyonce’s Superbowl Halftime show in 2013 and created Apple Music’s ad campaign with black celebrities. Boz’s work has been featured on superlative lists including Billboard Magazine’s list of top women in music, Fast Company’s 100 most creative people, and the Hollywood Reporter’s 2018 Women in Entertainment Power 100.

At the 2018 BET Awards, she encouraged entertainers and executives to use their platforms to advance various agendas, and use their power for good. She also sits on the board of Vital Voices, a powerful international organization identifying women leaders and supporting their visions.

I encourage everyone to keep an eye on these women, as well as the growing movement of African women leaders both on the continent and across the globe.

As Africa continues to produce top talent, as nations grow, and policies are written and implemented invest heavily in women and girls, I am confident the Forbes Power Women list will become more geographically balanced and reflect this growth.


 Interested in contributing for She Leads Africa? Click here.

 
Liz Grossman

Liz Grossman is an American entrepreneur, educator and communications specialist with over 12 years of experience living and working across Africa. Collaborating with some of Africa’s most powerful leaders in politics, development, education and business, Liz forges strategic partnerships to drive resources to changemakers across Africa. An expert and speaker on women’s leadership, education, development policy, mentorship and communications holding a Masters in International Education Policy from Harvard, Liz is renowned for her ability to convene powerful communities and provide people with tools to build bridges and collaborate. She currently lives in New York City, and can be spotted rocking colorful wax prints, finding the city's best places to eat fufu and dancing Afrobeats.

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38
HEALTH

How this Nigerian entrepreneur went from small start-up to saving lives

11 January 2019 3:22PM UTC | By: STANLEY AZUAKOLA

JOIN

Join the fight against extreme poverty

 
  

Since we first spoke with Temie Giwa-Tubosun in 2016, she’s been featured on Humans of New York and The Guardian’s Small Changes podcast to discuss her growing start-up company, LifeBank, which delivers lifesaving blood transfusions and oxygen.

Now, Temie’s channelling her expertise and transporting her ideas to the other side of Africa. She is on the advisory board for the Lake Victoria Challenge — a competition which uses innovative technology to transport health support and materials to some of the most remote parts of East Africa. Read on to find out more about how Temie got to where she is today. 


In 2009, Temie Giwa-Tubosun visited Nigeria, her homeland, for the first time since she was 10 years old. 13 years abroad had insulated her from some of the harsh realities in her home country, but back as a graduate school intern with the UK’s Department for International Development (DfID), she witnessed an incident which became a motivation for her life’s work.

A young woman had been in labour for three days and her family, unable to afford hospital bills, milled around her waiting for death to come. Temie and her colleagues showed up at the doorsteps of the petrified family hoping they would participate in a household survey. It was fortuitous timing – they lifted the woman into their truck and moved her to the hospital. She survived, but her baby sadly died.

“I had never seen anything like that. The family had resigned itself to losing her,” says Temie of the incident.

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Temie with one of the motorbikes used to transfer LifeBank blood across Nigeria. via Twitter.

Blood is a big deal

Temie spent just three months in Nigeria during that visit but she became obsessed from that moment with stopping maternal mortality.

Nigeria contributes the second largest share to maternal and child death rates in the world – hemorrhages kill more pregnant women every year than any other complication apart from pre-eclampsia (high blood pressure). Malaria patients (especially children), sickle cell patients, cancer patients, victims of terror attacks, and many others end up needing blood at different times as well. A pattern was emerging in Temie’s mind – blood is a big deal.

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In 2012, Temie returned to Nigeria and started the One Percent Project to “inspire a new generation of voluntary blood donors to solve the problem of blood shortages.”

The One Percent Project kept a database of willing prospective donors who could be reached at a moment’s notice to donate blood. At the time of writing, the project had received donations of 3500 pints of blood to date, enough to save over 10,000 lives. Her work earned her a 2014 nomination in the BBC’s 100 Women List.

But Temie wasn’t satisfied. The NGO model wasn’t working for her. It could not solve the problem in a “significant way,” she said and she worried about sustainability when the project rested on the whims of donors.

“Every year the funders decide what they care about,” she says. “I spent 70 per cent of the time looking for money.” Her response was to quit her day job with the Lagos government and launch a technology-powered social enterprise called LifeBank, “the biggest virtual based blood bank in Nigeria.”

At first glance, it seems like the only problem is one of supply not matching demand, but it is “actually an information and logistics problem.”

A blood bank in Ikeja, Lagos – for instance – may have the blood needed by a patient elsewhere in Lagos, but the patient and the hospital may be unaware. Stored blood has a shelf life and is discarded if it is not used within six weeks. This is waste which could be avoided if the hospital had access to the information.

The second challenge is transporting the blood from where it is available to where it is needed in safe and reliable condition.

LifeBank solves both of these problems. It uses technology to provide information to health providers about where to find the blood they need at any given time and then helps deploy it in quick time and in good condition to save lives.

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“We have an online database where health providers can search themselves for blood availability and pay for it. Or they could call us on our toll free numbers to help them find it,” she says.

Nigeria’s health systems largely remain basic and unreceptive to change – Nigerians spend up to $1 billion annually on medical tourism – so LifeBank is operating in almost virgin territory. Making a business case to investors for health technology in Nigeria, according to Temie, is challenging – especially for women.

“Investors tend to bet on people who look like them,” she says. A 30-year old mum navigating in the male-dominated tech sector of a notoriously sexist society like Nigeria looks nothing like the typical investor. “It is hard for them to trust the judgement, vision and ability of women to move the company they’re building forward,” Temie says, “but I don’t let it stop me.” Her advice to women? “Don’t wait till you think everything is certain. Women have to just start.”

This article originally appeared on ONE Africa in December 2016.

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Our #ThrowbackThursday looks back 3 weeks to when President of Ireland / Uachtarán na hÉireann Michael D. Higgins welcomed our Rest and Recuperation Group to Áras an Uachtaráin for a special reception.

During this visit to Ireland's own 'Home of Hope', President Higgins paid tribute to the volunteers who have provided endless support to Chernobyl's victims and very poignantly declared;
"Children, you are most welcome"

La imagen puede contener: 2 personas, personas sonriendo, personas sentadas

La imagen puede contener: 11 personas, personas sonriendo, personas sentadas

La imagen puede contener: 8 personas, personas sonriendo, personas de pie e interior

La imagen puede contener: 5 personas, personas sonriendo, personas sentadas

La imagen puede contener: 4 personas, personas sonriendo, personas sentadas

La imagen puede contener: 6 personas, personas sonriendo

La imagen puede contener: 3 personas, personas de pie y boda

La imagen puede contener: 2 personas, personas sonriendo, personas de pie

La imagen puede contener: 4 personas, personas de pie

La imagen puede contener: 3 personas, personas sonriendo

La imagen puede contener: 4 personas, personas de pie

La imagen puede contener: 3 personas

La imagen puede contener: 7 personas, personas de pie

La imagen puede contener: 5 personas, personas sonriendo, personas de pie

La imagen puede contener: 1 persona, de pie e interior

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GIRLS & WOMEN

Malawi Campaigners Seek to End Sex in Girls' Initiation Ceremony

Child rights campaigners say the initiation ritual fuels Malawi's high rate of child marriage.

By Lameck Masina

MULANJE, MALAWI — In rural Malawi, families send girls as young as 12 years old for "initiation," a traditional, cultural practice that marks a child's entry into adulthood. But child rights campaigners say the ritual entices young girls into early sex, marriage, and teenage pregnancy — forcing many to drop out of school. One local organization is seeking to change this by teaching initiation counselors to give girls age-appropriate information.

Madalitso Makosa was 13 years old when she underwent a traditional, Malawian initiation ritual to become an adult.

She says after the initiation ceremony, the counselors advised her to perform a Kusasa Fumbi or "removing the dust" ritual with a man of my choice. She chose to sleep with her former boyfriend but, unfortunately, became pregnant.

Take Action: Urge Denmark to Invest in Women and Girls So That #SheIsEqual

 

"Removing the dust" refers to a girl losing her virginity, often without protection, to become an adult. Those who become teenage mothers pay the price for this tradition.

Makosa says when she discovered she was pregnant, she was devastated because she had to drop out of school. She is now struggling to get support to take care of her baby. She wished she had continued with her education."

During the initiation, counselors show how they prepare girls for marriage and for sex.

Agnes Matemba, is an initiation counselor.

She says she gives girls these lessons so that they should keep their man and prevent him from going out to look for another woman. Because, if he goes out and finds excitement in other women, he is likely to dump her.

Child rights campaigners say the initiation ritual fuels Malawi's high rate of child marriage. Half the girls here marry before age 18.

Malawian group Youthnet and Counselling, YONECO, wants to keep girls in school with a more age-appropriate initiation ritual.

MacBain Mkandawire is YONECO's executive director.

"This is a traditional cultural thing that people believe in, and it will be very difficult to just say let us end initiation ceremonies," Mkandawire said. "But what we are saying is that can we package the curriculum in such way the young people are accessing the correct curriculum at the correct time?"

Read More: Teen Barricades Herself in Hotel Room to Escape Saudi Arabia's Sexist Laws

YONECO is working with initiation counselors and traditional leaders to tone down Malawi's initiations. Already, some areas are banning the practice of encouraging sex after the ceremony.

Aidah Deleza is also known as Senior Chief Chikumbu.

"We say no, no, no," Chikumbu said. "This is why we have a lot of girls drop out from school, that is why the population has just shot so high just because of that, just because a lot of girls now they have got babies, most of them they are not in marriage."

To further discourage teenage pregnancy, traditional leaders like Chikumbu are dividing girls' initiation rituals into two camps.

One is a simple ceremony for teenage girls like Makosa, while the other provides some sex education for older girls who are preparing to marry.

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HEALTH

NYC Just Launched a Health Insurance Program That Could Help Thousands of Low-Income Residents

This program will cover 600,000 uninsured New Yorkers.


Why Global Citizens Should Care
Good health is essential in order to reduce extreme poverty and that is why Global Citizen campaigns on issues related to global health. Commitments to the universal health coverage movement are promising steps in achieving healthy lives for all. You can take action here.

A new $100-million health insurance program will cover 600,000 uninsured people living in New York City, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced Tuesday.

This new program, which was announced at a news conference at Lincoln Hospital in the Bronx, will be made available to residents that cannot to afford coverage — including an estimated 300,000 residents who are undocumented immigrants, according to CBC.

Take Action: It’s Time to Deliver on the Promise of Universal Health Coverage

Actúa: Firma

 
 
 
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“I refuse the notion that these folks don’t deserve health care,” the mayor said. “It is not only the morally right choice, but it will save taxpayers in the end.”

The program, called NYC Care, will provide residents with an insurance card and assign them to a doctor, which will give them access to primary care and various health care services. The fees for the services will be determined based on income, the Washington Post reported.

 

Health care isn’t just a right in theory, it must be a right in practice. Today I’m announcing a plan to guarantee health care for all New Yorkers. Through our own public option and a new program called NYC Care, we’ll ensure the first stop for people isn’t the emergency room.

 
 
 
 

The new plan is an extension of New York’s current MetroPlus program, which offers health insurance at low or no cost to low-income residents in Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens and the Bronx. The idea is that providing upfront medical care like this could limit emergency hospital visits, which is much more cost efficient, overall.

This is an important step in line with universal health coverage, the concept explained by the World Health Organization as the ability for all people to access the vital health services they need, without experiencing financial hardship.

Related StoriesJohnson & JohnsonWhat Is Universal Health Coverage and How Can We Achieve It?

De Blasio’s announcement arrives at a time when health care is a touchy subject in the US, as the Trump administration works to abolish Obamacare and Democrats look at ways to implement a federally funded single-payer health care system, accessible to all, according to CBC.

Sliding scale fees for health care could result in affordable coverage for all, and it would also mean access to free services for low-income residents who truly cannot afford them.

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GIRLS & WOMEN

Teen Fleeing Saudi Arabia Is One Step Closer to Receiving Asylum

Now she waits to see which country will offer her protection.


Why Global Citizens Should Care
Strict laws around the world stop women from receiving basic rights. With refugee status, Saudi teen Rahaf al-Qunun is closer to living a safe, independent life. You can join us on taking action on this issue here

The United Nations has recognized Saudi teenager Rahaf al-Qunun as a refugee after she barricaded herself in a Thai airport to escape her allegedly abusive family, the BBC reports

Qunun was detained in Bangkok’s Suvarnabhumi Airport Saturday for not having a visa but gained international attention when she and three Saudi women launched the social media campaign #SaveRahaf. Australia’s Department for Home Affairs announced in a statement Wednesday it was considering her request for asylum, according to BuzzFeed News.

Take Action: Step Up to Support Migrants and Refugees!

Actúa: Tuitea ahora

 
 
 
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United StatesUnited KingdomGermanyCanadaAustraliaAfghanistanÅland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBruneiBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCabo VerdeCambodiaCameroonCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo (the Democratic Republic of the)Cook IslandsCosta RicaCôte d'IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands  [Malvinas]Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambia (The)GeorgiaGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuamGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and McDonald IslandsHoly See  [Vatican City State]HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIranIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKuwaitKyrgyzstanLaosLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedoniaMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMicronesia (the Federated States of)MoldoviaMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorth KoreaNorthern Mariana IslandsNorwayOmanPakistanPalauPalestine, State ofPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarRéunionRomaniaRussiaRwandaSaint BarthélemySaint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth KoreaSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyriaTaiwanTajikistanTanzaniaThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited States Minor Outlying IslandsUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuelaVietnamVirgin Islands (British)Virgin Islands (U.S.)Wallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabwe

 

 

En asociación con: CHIME FOR CHANGE

"If she is found to be a refugee, then we will give very, very, very serious consideration to a humanitarian visa," Australian Health Minister Greg Hunt told the ABC network before the UN determination was made public.

Qunun also asked Canada, the UK, and the US for asylum. More than 80,000 people have already signed a petition for the UK to let her into the country. 

Qunun had been vacationing with her family in Kuwait last week when she ran away and boarded a plane to Bangkok en route to Australia, according to NPR. Thai security stopped her by the request of the Saudi embassy, proceeded to take her passport, and held her in a hotel room. Officials were planning to send her back to Kuwait until she received international press attention from the social media account updating her situation. UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency, took Qunun under its protection Monday. 

 
 

The Saudi teen claims her family became abusive when she renounced Islam. Under Saudi Arabia’s Islamic male guardianship system, women require approval from a male relative for basic rights like enrolling in school, working, traveling, and more. 

Qunun’s brother and father, a senior government official, went to the Bangkok airport once they heard the news but she has not wanted to see them. 

Read More: Saudi Arabian Women Are Wearing Their Clothes Inside Out to Protest Dress Codes

"She said she has made a decision to renounce Islam. And I knew once she said that, she is in serious trouble," Phil Robertson, deputy Asia director of Human Rights Watch, told Reuters. 

Renouncing Islam in Saudi Arabia can be punishable by death. 

Despite the circumstances, Australia’s home affairs minister, Peter Dutton, told reporters there would be “no special treatment” for Qunun.

Politicians like Australian Greens senator, Sarah Hanson-Young, is uring the government to act fast on Qunun’s entry status. “It is time to bring this courageous young woman to Australia to start her life as a free woman,” she told the Guardian.

A UNHCR spokesperson told the Guardian Qunun will remain safe under their watch while her case is processed. 

Saudi women who stand up against the country’s oppressive laws under Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman have experienced serious consequences. Despite progress like the lifted decades-long driving ban, dozens of rights activists have been detained and tortured

While people around the world have shown support for Qunun, some Saudi Arabians have criticized her choice. 

 

“Rahaf al-Qunun-mark my words,is going to start a revolution in Saudi Arabia.Go on social media now & watch accounts of so many young Saudis saying,“Rahaf,you’ve shown us,that we can do this! Rahaf, you have shown us,that we deserve to be free”
pic.twitter.com/4VG2rKnGQ5 #SaveRahaf

 
 
 
 

“She is a young Saudi woman whose face has been plastered around the world,” Director of Human Rights Watch Elaine Pearson told the Guardian. “She’s more at risk than other refugees, not just from her family but threats she has faced online and from her own government.” 

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HIV/AIDS

14 facts about the AIDS epidemic you need to know

28 November 2018 3:39PM UTC | By: ONE

SIGN THE PLEDGE

Sign the pledge: We’ll do whatever it takes to end AIDS

 
  

Thirty years ago, HIV/AIDS swept the globe largely unchecked, and a diagnosis was seen as a death sentence. Two decades later, we’ve made amazing progress – AIDS-related deaths are down by half – but the good news makes the bad news worse.

This good news may be hiding a big problem. The incredible progress the world has made against AIDS has created a sense of complacency that is threatening our ability to end AIDS within our lifetime.

You might not know it from watching the news or listening to lawmakers, but AIDS is still a crisis. Nearly 37 million people are living with HIV today, and more than 15 million of them still can’t get life-saving treatment. This is something we can change, but it will take leadership.

These stats show the true scale of the AIDS epidemic, and why world leaders must take action to make this a disease of the past.

Globally

  • Around 37 million people are living with HIV/AIDS. That’s nearly the entire population of Canada.
  • Around 35 million people have died from HIV/AIDS since the start of the epidemic. That’s the same as the entire population of Morocco.
  • Nearly 1 million people died from AIDS-related illnesses in 2017. That’s more than 2,500 people dying from AIDS-related causes every day.
  • AIDS is the number one disease killer of young women globally.
  • Nearly 1,000 young women are infected with HIV every day. That’s 40 women every hour.
  • Only about half of children living with HIV/AIDS are receiving treatment. Last year, 180,000 children were infected with HIV during birth or breastfeeding — the first time that new pediatric infections have not fallen since they peaked in 2002.

Sub-Saharan Africa

  • Sub-Saharan Africa accounted for nearly 65% of new infections globally. 1.2 million people were infected with HIV in the region in 2017.
  • Sub-Saharan Africa accounted for over 70% of deaths globally. Over 650,000 people died in the region in 2017.
  • 282,000 young women (age 15-24) were infected with HIV in 2017 – that’s over 750 a day.
  • Young women in sub-Saharan Africa are twice as likely to be infected with HIV than young men.

The good news

  • Globally, more than 21 million people were receiving lifesaving treatment at the end of 2017, up from 11 million in 2012. That’s a 91% increase.
  • In sub-Saharan Africa, 14.6 million people were receiving lifesaving treatment at the end of 2017, up from 7.7 million in 2012. That’s a 90% increase.
  • Globally, 1.8 million people became infected with HIV in 2017 – down from 2 million in 2013. That’s a 10% decrease.
  • In the last 15 years, the cost of antiretroviral treatment for one person has dropped from US$10,000 a year to US$75 a year — an all-time low.

France will host a Global Fund Replenishment Conference in October 2019 – meetings that aim to raise new funds and mobilize partners. It will provide a great opportunity for governments, businesses, and health organizations to recommit to the fight to end AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria. It must be a turning point, anything less will be an indictment of our global leadership.

We know what to do, we know how to do it, and we know if we don’t move faster than the virus, then it will win. AIDS isn’t done. And neither are we.

To win the fight against AIDS, we need you. This World AIDS Day, ONE members are turning our outrage into action and putting our leaders on notice – add your voice today!

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