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  1. Today
  2. padawanbeck84

    Have to Count - the new and improved one :P

    44, 905 - Middle-of-the-week counting.
  3. pain_18_

    u2 song of the day

    LEMON !!!!!!!!🍋
  4. paoladegliesposti

    u2 song of the day

  5. dmway

    What Hasn't U2 Released Yet That You Want?

    ...and I'd like this released digitally:
  6. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    ENVIRONMENT Climate Change Is Having a Great Depression-Like Effect on the Global Economy Countries that have caused the least climate change are facing the most consequences, study says. Why Global Citizens Should Care The effects of climate change are being felt unevenly around the world, and the countries least responsible for greenhouse gas emissions are often facing the most brutal consequences. The United Nations urges countries to fulfill the Paris climate agreement to avoid further environmental harms. You can join us in taking action on related issues here. The gap between the wealthiest and poorest countries has been steadily declining over the past several decades, but that gap would have closed by an additional 25% if climate change hadn’t created a massive economic drag, according to a new study published in the science journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Past studies on the economic consequences of climate change have focused on the anticipated effects years down the line, or calculated the costs associated with extreme weather events. This study, on the other hand, looks at how temperature increases have already been reducing economic output. And the brunt of this effect is being felt by the world’s poorest countries. “Many of the [most affected countries] also have low per capita GDP, and have contributed relatively little to historical greenhouse gas emissions,” Noah Diffenbaugh, the lead author of the study and a climate scientist at Stanford University, told Global CItizen. “There’s an asymmetry between the countries that emitted the largest fraction of the historical greenhouse gas emissions and the countries most vulnerable to climate change,” he added. Take Action: Call on Corporate Leaders to Commit to Resilient Response Sign Now: Call on Corporate Leaders to Commit to Resilient Response TAKE ACTION The researchers looked at aggregate economic data between 1961 and 2010 and compared it to temperature changes over this period. They found that temperature increases associated with global warming caused marked declines in economic activity. These effects have been most pronounced in countries around the equator, where climate change has caused deadly heat waves, unleashed supercharged storms, and made extreme droughts more likely. India’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP) would be an additional 30% higher had temperatures not risen from the accumulation of greenhouse gas emissions in the atmosphere, according to the report. That sort of drag is equivalent to the Great Depression in United States, the authors note. Although India has made great strides in reducing poverty, more than 70 million people live on less than $1.90 per day, nearly half the population practices open defecation, and 240 million people lack access to electricity. Read More: Greenland's Rapidly Melting Ice Threatens People Living in Poverty the Most Without climate change, the country would have likely made greater progress in reducing these inequities, the new study suggests. Diffenbaugh said that rising temperatures reduce economic output in a number of ways. As it becomes hotter, workers become less productive, staple crop yields decline, cognitive functioning decreases, and interpersonal conflict rises. In recent years, devastating heat waves have all but stopped outdoor economic activity in countries as diverse as Pakistan and Japan. Embed from Getty Images Diffenbaugh said that there are multiple benefits to transitioning to renewable energy for both poor and rich economies. Read More: The Crazy Reason Greenland Is Rooting for Climate Change First, replacing fossil fuels with renewable energy causes fewer greenhouse gas emissions to get released into the atmosphere, which in turn reduces the costs associated with climate change from natural disasters, heat waves, and so on. Second, millions of people still lack access to electricity around the world. Renewable energy is a cheap and effective way to connect them to the global economy, which can greatly increase per capita GDP. “Economic inequality is a persistent challenge globally and there’s been substantial progress in recent decades in terms of lifting people out of extreme poverty and narrowing the economic gap between the world’s richest and poorest countries,” Diffenbaugh said. “But there are still very large populating that continue to lack electricity, continue to lack clean water, continue to rely on biomass for cooking, which has huge health impacts, so despite the progress, global economic inequality is a major challenge.” TOPICSEnvironmentScienceClimate ChangeStudyPNAS
  7. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    OPINIONENVIRONMENT Why You Should Probably Never Drink Bottled Water Again And 10 facts about the bottled water industry. Konstantin Stepanov/Flickr The bottled water industry is about as wasteful as they come. This billion dollar industry is taking something that is essentially free around the world, packaging it, and selling it for profit. And it gets worse. Nestlé — the same company that brings you those delicious Toll House cookies — decided in May to open a new plant in the middle of the drought-stricken desert in Arizona. This decision has raised many concerns and questions, the most obvious being “how can they bottle water in a desert?” Many of the concerned groups are environmental activists. Nestle already faces backlash from groups angry about them bottling water in the San Bernardino Mountains, and a group in Oregon voted in favor of anti-bottling measures on a proposed anti-bottling measures. Additionally, a petition was started on Change.org calling Nestlé Waters “irresponsible and unsustainable,” pointing out that Arizona has officially been in a drought for 17 years. 59 people are talking about this City officials concluded that there will be enough water for both Pure Life and the city’s tap, but environmentalists (and Global Citizens) aren’t convinced. The bottled water industry is bad for the environment. Nearly 80 percent of plastic water bottles simply become litter in a landfill, creating 2 million tonsof plastic bottle waste every year. Here are 10 things you might not know about the bottled water industry. The first case of bottled water sold dates back to Boston, Massachusetts, in the 1760s. Mineral water was bottled and sold by a spa for therapeutic uses. For the first time ever, bottled water sales are going to surpass the sale of soda in the US. Global consumption of bottled water increases by 10 percent every year. The slowest growth is in Europe, while the fastest growth is in North America. The energy we waste bottling water would be enough to power 190,000 homes. Food & Water Watch reported that more than half of bottled water comes from the tap. Bottled water is no safer than tap water. In fact, 22 percent of bottled brands tested contained chemicals at levels above state health limits in at least one sample. It takes three times more water to produce a plastic water bottle than it does to fill one. The amount of oil used to make a year's worth of bottles could fillone million cars for a year. Only one in five plastic bottles are recycled. The bottled water industry made $13 billion in 2014, but it would only cost $10 billion to provide clean water to everyone in the world. TOPICSrecycleNestlébottled waterplastic bottles COMMENTS
  8. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    This Friday, 26 April 2019, marks the 33rd Anniversary of the devastating Chernobyl disaster. On the 30th Anniversary of the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant, our Voluntary CEO Adi Roche addressed a special session of the Naciones Unidas General Assembly and made the suggestion that, as part of a campaign to raise global awareness of the consequences of the Chernobyl accident, April 26th should be designated as Chernobyl Disaster Remembrance Day. Adi's plea was later ratified and later this week we will commemorate the third Naciones Unidas 'International Chernobyl Disaster Remembrance Day' with nations all across the world. On this special day of commemoration, we ask you to join us to say to the victims and survivors of Chernobyl that they will not be forgotten. #UNChernobylDay #IWillNotForgetYou
  9. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    Did you know that the Government and local councils offer discounts, schemes, and free passes for some forms of public transport? 🚌 🚍 🚆🚘 No? 😮 Well, we may have some details that might be of interest to you. 😉 Visit: https://bit.ly/2BHIQ4q
  10. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    Calling all Wicklow-based bands and singer-songwriters aged 18 and under! Music Generation Wicklow is launching a new recording mentorship workshop for bands and solo artists who write their own music. Four shortlisted bands/solo artists will receive professional mentorship and funding to record and shoot a video for their single. Final date for receipt of entries is this Friday, 26 April.
  11. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    We’re sad to learn that Dr. Manasseh Phiri, the renowned AIDS activist featured in our documentary the Lazarus Effect has passed away. As one of Zambia’s most prominent leaders in the AIDS fight, Dr. Phiri was a leading force driving activism around global health issues. Thank you Dr. Phiri for inspiring us and fighting to end AIDS — your legacy lives on.
  12. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    500 babies are born with HIV every day. But, we can change this. Join (RED) & let's #endAIDS. 👊🏽
  13. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    0 GIRLS AND WOMEN This Ethiopian entrepreneur is breaking tradition to empower women 24 October 2018 4:48PM UTC | By: ABLE JOIN Join the fight against extreme poverty EmailJoin Share on Facebook Save on Facebook Share on Twitter Share by Email In this series, we’re introducing you to strong and savvy female entrepreneurs from Ethiopia who have partnered with social enterprise and lifestyle brand ABLE. Semhal Guesh grew up in Ethiopia hearing a phrase many young girls her age did not: “You can do whatever you want.” Now 27 years old, it’s no coincidence that Semhal has become a designer, architect, and entrepreneur. She now runs Kabana, a leather production company in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia’s capital and largest city, and through her company, she helps other women realise their full potential. “Most of my life, my father told me I could accomplish any ideas that I had; that I had no limits,” said Semhal. “In Ethiopia, every family is male-dominated and sons are given more chances than daughters. But with my dad, that was not the case.” Semhal recognizes that if she had grown up in rural Ethiopia or with parents less encouraging than her own, she might have been expected to stop her education at 12 years old and get married. Instead, Semhal dreamed of becoming an astronaut or an astrophysicist because she hadn’t seen a lot of women in those professions. But it was architecture that won over Semhal for the ability to create something both beautiful and functional. While studying for her Bachelors in Architecture, she picked up a few leather samples at a local market and began designing with it. Suddenly, her dormitory transformed into a small workshop with a handful of women hand stitching products to sell at bazaars. “By day, we’d go to lectures and we’d make leather products at night,” said Semhal. “It was more about the joy of designing and turning our work into an actual reality. It wasn’t to earn money. It was something we could do together.” After graduation, Semhal began working in architecture full-time while still managing to grow her leather business. Her supervisor at the architecture firm saw her passion and encouraged her to spend more time focused on her growing leather company until she eventually made the decision to devote all her time to Kabana. “It was a hectic time, but my motivation was seeing how the job and income were changing the life of my first employee,” said Semhal. “She came to me with minimum knowledge or experience, but I taught her how to cut and stitch leather and design development. In time, I saw her changing, knowing what to do, and unafraid to share her ideas because she had the freedom to speak out. I thought ‘I’m paying somebody who supports their family. I’m part of the generation that’s creating opportunities and income for her.’” Today, Semhal and her staff of 31 are in high demand, thanks in part to her background in architecture, which gives her an eye for design and an understanding of technical specifications. Kababa creates handmade leather bags, wallets, folders, and custom products for clients in Ethiopia, the U.S., and Sweden. On a mission to give other women the same support she has received, Semhal is focused on motivating the women she hires to expect more for themselves. She enrolls her employees in different training programs to help them realize their value and potential, invests in their new business ideas through loans, offers paid time away from work, mentorship, and coaching. “Everyone is shy in Ethiopia, especially girls,” said Semhal. “I tell my employees about myself, how I got to where I am, and that not everything is easy. Then I push them to have a conversation with other women. I want them to know they don’t have to be closed off.” Thankfully, Semhal believes her country’s view of women is changing, evidenced by recent changes such as the government’s decision to back women’s education and the creation of various leadership and professional associations. As more doors open for women in Ethiopia, Semhal continues to raise the bar on women’s equality, safety, wages and benefits in the workplace. Through her company’s partnership with ABLE, Kabana has undergone the ACCOUNTABLE social impact audit and found opportunities to improve her wages, maternity leave policy, medical coverage, and employment practices. “Ethiopia doesn’t have a set minimum wage policy,” said Semhal. “When ABLE introduced liveable wages to KABANA, it gave us a new benchmark.” “I want to show that you can be an entrepreneur and be young and a woman,” said Semhal. “It takes a lot of convincing, but I’m not one to back away from a challenge. Breaking the tradition starts with hearing the stories about other women and their success.” ABLE is publishing its lowest wages to protect and empower the fashion industry’s most vulnerable workers, most of whom are women. To provide consumers with complete transparency, all their partners must go through the rigorous and exhaustive ACCOUNTABLE assessment, evaluating their workplace’s equality, safety, wages and benefits, with a particular emphasis on women. To learn more about ABLE’s #PUBLISHYOURWAGES movement that inspires consumers to demand greater transparency of their favourite brands, visit www.livefashionable.com/publishyourwages. ONE welcomes the contributions of guest bloggers but does not necessarily endorse the views, programs, or organisations highlighted.
  14. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    0 CULTURE The Maasai brand is valuable — and it should belong to the Maasai people 28 July 2017 5:18PM UTC | By: GUEST BLOGGER JOIN Join the fight against extreme poverty EmailJoin Share on Facebook Save on Facebook Share on Twitter Share by Email By Meg Brindle, Light Years IP I was at a conference in Kenya when I first met a member of the Maasai, a group of people who live in East Africa. He had a question for me – and the answers could have the potential to dramatically impact poverty for millions of low-income farmers, producers and others. You’d recognise the Maasai from photos. Many are tall, elegant and very distinctively dressed. Often, when a generic image is used of Africans in photos or advertising, it’s of Maasai. Their designs and style get used by others – but the Maasai don’t earn a penny. Embed from Getty Images That’s not right. It’s cultural appropriation – but it’s also bad business. Increasingly, the things that make products valuable aren’t the ingredients that go into them – it’s the intangible things, including the brands. And companies are careful to look out for their brands, spending millions to protect and defend them. Think about Coca-Cola or Apple. Their products are more than sugar, fruit juice, and water, or metal and plastic, chips and screen. Their brand value is much greater than the value of the physical resources. That’s because of the ideas, imagination, and presentation that come together in great products: what business calls “intellectual property (IP).” So what does this mean for a semi-nomadic tribe of nearly 2 million across Tanzania and Kenya? We’d been working with Ethiopian Fine Coffee to help them own their own brands and license them. We’d helped return $101 million to coffee exporters. That’s when I met the Maasai elder. He tapped me on the shoulder and said: “ We understand that IP works for coffee. The Maasai have a brand that is used by many western companies without our permission. Can you help us?” A group of Maasai people. (Photo credit: joxeankoret/Wikimedia Commons) We engaged Maasai University students in researching the dozens of companies using the Maasai name, image and brand without their permission. Our friends at Comic Relief were kind enough to help fund the feasibility study. Brand expert David Cardwell who did the Star Wars licensing deal helped. Our goal was to let the Maasai run the process with some good advice from others. To them, respect and removal of culturally inappropriate images are as important as income. For six years, we have been about helping the Maasai to organize and form MIPI -The Maasai IP Initiative. With outreach across Kenya and Tanzania and radio broadcasts, materials translated to Maa and Swahili, Light Years IP and the Maasai have reached 500,000 Maasai — a critical mass to own, control, license and where relevant, to create solutions with large companies that had used their brand name. One big car company, for example, returned the Maasai trademark and negotiations are underway with Louis Vuitton Moet Hennessy. In 2012, a Louis Vuitton fashion show featured Maasai scarves and shirts modelled and sold for upwards of 1,000 euros each. Of course, the LVMH brand is valued highly and IP and brand experts can help us to quantify what portion is due to cultural appropriation of the Maasai iconic values of bravery, strength, and warrior images. The Maasai are a proud people — respectful and honourable. The Maasai leadership has been offended at the cultural misappropriation of their brand and name. They understand that it is valuable – and it’s theirs. Our analysis shows it is worth about $250 million. Embed from Getty Images Maasai elder, Isaac ole Tialalo, leader of MIPI has been to Capitol Hill and to Parliament in London with The African IP Trust, headed by Lord Paul Boating. It’s an honour for our support and advocacy group to help the Maasai achieve win-win situations with companies. We think that the Maasai are an inspiration and model to other indigenous people who are about 6% of the world’s population and suffer both cultural appropriation and poverty. The Cherokee, Navajo, and Tourag, for example, add value to countless products and companies. It is not easy to regain control after cultural appropriation, but we think it is the right thing to do. Find out more about the Maasai here.
  15. Yesterday
  16. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    YES! 👏🏽👏🏽👏🏽
  17. CorkVegan

    u2 song of the day

  18. Is there a problem with U2.com? Looks like no updates since march 13

    1. Max Tsukino

      Max Tsukino

      no problem at present...

    2. Fuzzyduck

      Fuzzyduck

      Was Thinking That Myself.....tbh

  19. Manohlive

    u2 song of the day

    Likewise. Fez Being Born.
  20. pain_18_

    u2 song of the day

    STAND UP Comedy !!! I Love the No Line on the Horizon Album !!!!!!
  21. paoladegliesposti

    u2 song of the day

  22. paoladegliesposti

    If I read the Bible today..

    Wisdom 6:12 Wisdom is bright and unfading. She readily appears to those who love her. She ' s found by those who keep seeking after her.
  23. Manohlive

    If I read the Bible today..

    Love one another.
  24. Manohlive

    2019 Subscription - Subscribers Gift

    I like how they worded when this year's gift would start happening. Unless I'm way off track, it was Spring but they left it open either way. I thought that was smart and respectful of subscribers' voiced frustrations. Part of me hopes and thinks this is going to start May/June. A bigger part of me hopes it goes well when it does-the better they get it right than rush it mentality which I've read other Zootopians post when we've been waiting for for a past U2 event. I've been listening to the first two tracks from online uploads. I'm very happy with how great they sound, even with YouTube. It's nice to be able to hear them even though I do not resubscribe for a few weeks.
  25. Last week
  26. padawanbeck84

    Have to Count - the new and improved one :P

    44, 904 - Happy counting as our internet is finally back on For some reason, it hadn't been working since Friday!
  27. cristiu2

    2019 Subscription - Subscribers Gift

    Still no news on anything yet... No down-undertour announcement, no dvd-news, no fanclubcd-news. In the meantime the Rolling Stones keep releasing blurays, dvd's , cd's etc. etc.. I'm convinced there will be solid and great releases, but why the long wait... Or surprise once more....
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