STING

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About STING

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  1. This thread is ageist. You don't have to stop doing things just because you hit a certain age and sit in a rocking chair all day. If the band want to play into their 80s or beyond, there is nothing wrong with that. Music is not a professional contact sport. You can play music at virtually any age. People who see you can't because you have gray hair or lines on your face our obviously equally or more interested in the visual of how the artist looks as opposed to how they sound. Also staying active is the healthy option as the band gets older. The more active and engaged you are, the healthier you will be and the longer you will live.
  2. STING

    So Much Money!

    For most shows, the ticket pricing is the following $325, $171, $106, $76, $41. There are seats at the $41 ticket price behind the stage upper level and at the far end of the arena upper level. There are also seats at the $76 price level. So if you don't want to pay $325 per ticket, you DON'T have too. There were $300 dollar priced tickets on the Songs Of Innocence tour and $275 priced tickets on the 360 tour. These higher ticket prices are NOT NEW!
  3. If you were to sell your house, would you sell it for what its worth or would throw the buyer a bone and offer it half off? Yes, there are tickets, lots of tickets at the $325 price. But there also as tickets for as little as $41. The $76 dollar GA tickets get you on the floor and closest to the band. Most other artist charge market value for floor tickets. U2 take a loss every show by under pricing the General Admission tickets on the floor. So the band is very kind to the fans in that respect. Also, Bono is worth $700 million, Edge $250 million, Larry $200 million, and Adam $200 million according to the website "celebrity net worth".
  4. STING

    GA TICKETS

    The first shows pre-sale for Experience was soldout of GA when I went in there at 10:08 AM back on tuesday NOV 14. I did not go in right away because I first purchased a ticket for the Philadelphia show. But, two days ago after getting blocked for the pre-sale for 2nd Philadelphia show, I went into the ticketmaster section for D.C. and got a GA ticket at 10:06 AM. Being in the Experience group works all the time I think provided you get in right at 10:00 AM when the sale starts. If you get in later than that, your chances of getting a GA decline. The problem I had during the first pre-sale two weeks ago is that I was trying to buy GA tickets for two different concerts that went on sale at the same time.
  5. Ok, When was that UPDATE made and how were potential buyers informed of that prior to the pre-sale? What would have prompted people to go to the HELP page just prior to buying tickets on Tuesday? Where besides the HELP page is this UPDATE listed? I received an E-mail the day of the Pre-sale saying that I had one ticket option left on my access code and that I could buy a ticket in the pre-sales. It said NOTHING about any restrictions for Philadelphia.
  6. All artist price tickets based on demand. Back in the 80s and early 90s there was usually only a single ticket price and so on average tickets were often sold below their true market value which made scalpers very wealthy. By the mid-90s the concert industry wised up. U2 finally wised up in 2001 on the Elevation tour introducing their first real tiered pricing levels for tickets. Better for the band to make what their worth rather than the scalpers. U2 is the most popular concert attraction worldwide or at least in the top five. When your that popular, demand for tickets is going to be crazy. But they always keep GA on the floor at a low price. When you buy a cheaper ticket in the seats, then you will get what you paid for. To be honest, there is no bad seat in an arena, especially when compared with a stadium. The band move around a lot too. Muse is a much less popular band in the United States compared to U2. Most of their concerts don't even sellout. Because of that, it makes the ticket buying experience much easier. Here is a brief history of U2 concert ticket prices in the United States: Boy Tour - $4.00 October Tour - $6.50 War Tour - $10.50 Unforgettable Fire Tour - $13.50 Joshua Tree Tour - $19.50 ZOO TV TOUR - $30.00 POPMART TOUR - $52.50, $37.50 Elevation Tour - $130.00, $85.00, $45.00 Vertigo Tour - $160.00, $95.00, $50.00 360 Tour - $275.00, $95.00, $55.00, $30.00 Innocence And Experience Tour: ? Joshua Tree Tour 2017: GA was $70 Experience And Innocence Tour: $325.00, $171.00, $106.00, $76.00, $41.00
  7. STING

    Success in DC

    Surprisingly, I scored a GA ticket in the pre-sale after my access code did not work for Philadelphia. But I got in kind of late because of the failure of the code in Philadelphia. I got in at 10:05 AM and they still had GA and I snagged one. So except for the Philadelphia snafu I successfully purchased GA tickets to two different shows, the first in the Pre-sale two weeks ago for the first Philadelphia show and the 2nd for the 2nd Washington D.C. show.
  8. I'm not seeing any update. In addition, I received an E-mail from U2.com at 4:47 AM, just under 5 hours before pre-sales were to start and there was NO MENTION of Philadelphia at all! So U2.com definitely screwed this one up for some people. I quickly changed plans after five minutes though and was able to get a GA ticket for the Washington D.C. show, so for me despite the complications I was successful. But I think there were other people who either did not have that option, were not lucky, an may still have a code with one ticket purchase left on it.
  9. My pre-sale code used to buy one ticket two weeks ago did not work this morning in buying a ticket for Philadelphia. I tried multiple times, but every time I entered the access code it told me my code was no longer valid or was already used up. After about 5 minutes I decided to try for Washington D.C. to see if the same thing would happen. It worked like it should for D.C. and I was able to get one general admission for Washington D.C.. So this was a problem with the Philadelphia show where ticketmaster transfers you to the Wells Fargo website to buy tickets. I imagine there are probably a lot of angry people right now with regards to the Philadelphia show!
  10. Obviously if by chance you receive a new code, use that. If not, you still have the old code. I have not received anything and will be using my old code and hope that is the way it works.
  11. I am also in the Experience group and purchased only one ticket in the first pre-sale. I have not received a new code either and will be looking to purchase another ticket with the code I used last time. It better work, or if we need a new code they better send it. They have not made this clear, but if you called U2.com and they told you to use the code you originally have, then that sounds like it will work that way.
  12. I doubt you got the exact same seats in two different years. Seats in Sec 329 of course. But do you know for a fact that the first row in section 329 was not at the top ticket price for IE in 2015? Also, the top row in 329 may be at the lower price level. Depends on where the cut off is. I don't think the whole section is charged at the top price. It is a beautiful side stage view. They may have been a little more careful about charging certain seats at these prices last time, but in general they know there are at least 10,000 people willing to pay these prices in the Boston area, because they scooped them up on the 360 tour in big football stadiums at $275 a ticket. Unfortunately when you move down to the arena, you only have at most 20,000 seats and so the top ticket price ends up being half of the available tickets in the venue. The one benefit of stadium shows is that there will be a higher percentage of cheaper tickets.
  13. I did not compare them to JT tour seats, I compared them to 360 tour seats. You know the 360 tour for the No Line On The Horizon album back in 2009-2011. Those shows had top tickets at $275 in a football stadium which is much larger than a basketball arena. Yes, they were lower level, but went to the top row of the lower level. Top row of the lower level in a football stadium is the same as the nose bleed seats in a Basketball arena. So that is why they feel justified in charging those prices. The worst seat in a basketball arena is better than at least half the seats in a football stadium in terms of how close you are to the band on stage. When you sell 10,000 tickets at $275 in a football stadium, they know they can do the same thing in an arena. Unfortunately, these high price tickets then take up a higher percentage of the total tickets available, but that is the price you pay when an artist plays a smaller venue and the artist is in high demand. Imagine what it would be like if U2 played theaters where only 3,000 tickets would be available. The prices would go even higher.
  14. Don't worry, as long as you registered the first time, you'll be ok. You don't have to register more than once when it comes to the pre-sale. It is the general sale that requires multiple registrations.
  15. I unfortunately did not see the Innocence And Experience Tour, but thought that the top ticket price was higher than the 360 tour. In any event, the top ticket price on 360 was $275 which adjusted for inflation turns out to be about $325 today. So that top ticket price for seats is the same as the top ticket price people paid for seats in a football stadium. Football stadium seats are further away from the stage because of the size of the football field. In the basketball arena these seats are closer to the stage because the floor is several time smaller. So your getting a better, closer view of the band at an equal ticket price to the 360 tour once you adjust for inflation. Can you tell me which venue/city you are talking about where $80 dollar seats are now $175 and $150 are now $330? I'm going to have to refresh my memory on all the price levels for each tour since 2000 in North America. Prior to 1997, there was only one price level at all U2 concerts.