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Quake Age: The Meltdown


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What I'll never understand is why a country builds 55 nuke energy plants when it's in an earthquake prone area of the world.  Isn't it an accident waiting to happen? mad.gif

I just hope the meltdown can be contained within the facility or we'll be seeing Chernobyl all over again.

Already the death toll is over 2000 due to the quake but if we have a nuclear disaster, the impact will hang around for years and years to come which could affect Japanese who are not even conceived yet.

Right now, I'm just so pissed off with, and feeling terribly sorry for the Japanese people.
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Japan's deteriorating situation could have major consequences for us all. From Natural to Man made disastor in the blink of an eye.

 

I'm in fear of the damage this could cause the rest of the world. People in Japan must be living the worst fear imaginable.

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Well the good news agt, is that they feel they can keep the meltdown contained. I'm just thinking of the employees that have to remain there and do their best to keep things under control. radiation levels are already 20 times above normal levels. We can just wait and watch.

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Voxxie, I don't subscribe to this apocalypse nonsense. But, I do think it is worrying what is happening in Japan on the nuclear front.

 

In the North, we have excessive radiation levels in Onagawa Nuclear Plant.

 

Then South of that we have problems at Reactors 1 & 3 at the Fukushima Daiichi Plant, including numerous explosions and excessive radiation levels. Experts are saying that Reactor 1 has already gone into meltdown and have lost containment. They maintain that the Japanese flushed the system with sea water, not to cool the rods, but to prevent the radiation from leaking into the atmosphere. They should have flushed the system with sea water sooner. They are working quicker to cool Reactor 3 by flushing it with Sea Water. Let's hope this works.

 

And then South of there, in the Tokai Daini Plant, the cooling system failed. Thankfully the backup is working. Let's hope it stays that way.

 

Again I say: 55 nuclear plants in a country that is rife with earthquakes is asking for trouble.

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What I'll never understand is why a country builds 55 nuke energy plants when it's in an earthquake prone area of the world.  Isn't it an accident waiting to happen? mad.gif

but you're not surprised, are you?
isnt this the keynote in all of mankinds behavior: act now! think later!!

we wouldnt have been stucked with this massive pile of dirt/garbage/plastic, if people would be sensible. and careful with this planet. just a simple example.
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You are right - I am not surprised. Have a read of this. Hopefully it will get people thinking about our future and whether or not we should consider nuclear power as being the way forward for our energy needs:

 

OPINION: A cautionary tale for nuclear Renaissance

By Mark Fitzpatrick

TOKYO, March 14, Kyodo

 

Just as the accidents at Chernobyl and Three Mile Island retarded the global expansion of nuclear power for around a quarter century, the disaster at Fukushima could similarly derail the much-predicted nuclear Renaissance.

 

Initially, the nuclear power plants at Fukushima and elsewhere in the Tohoku region appeared to have survived Friday's earthquake and ensuing tsunami. Had the reactors escaped without harm, it would have been a reassuring testimony to the farsighted planning and safety consciousness of Japan's nuclear power industry. If the nuclear power plants could survive even as severe a natural disaster as the magnitude 9.0 quake, then the world could be more assured about the future safety of nuclear power.

 

But such hopes were quickly dashed when one reactor and then another lost cooling and began to overheat at the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant. Fears of a nuclear meltdown spread like wildfire throughout the Internet and international media.

 

Around the world, many citizens will conclude that if even well-designed, well-run reactors in safety-conscious Japan cannot withstand the destructive power of nature, then other countries cannot afford to take a similar risk.

 

The disaster will strengthen antinuclear energy campaigns in other countries on the Pacific ''Ring of Fire'' such as Indonesia and the Philippines, where citizen groups already fiercely oppose government plans to introduce nuclear power. Vietnam, which is further along in plans for nuclear power but without the checks and balances of independent citizen groups, should also take heed.

 

In addition to their seismic volatility, some of these countries lack the kind of safety culture that characterizes Japanese industry. A Fukushima-type problem that happened elsewhere may well have even worse consequences than the nuclear disaster currently facing Japan.

 

Further afield, the Fukushima disaster should hold lessons for Iran, where the Bushehr nuclear reactor, scheduled to begin operations this spring, is also located in an earthquake zone.

 

The Russian suppliers of the Bushehr reactor have been very careful and recently delayed start-up because of an imperfection in one of the cooling pumps. Those Iranians who have expressed impatience at the delay should regard the Fukushima disaster as a precautionary tale.

 

(Mark Fitzpatrick, a former acting deputy U.S. assistant secretary of state for nonproliferation, is director of the disarmament and nonproliferation program at the International Institute for Strategic Studies in London)

 

==Kyodo

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