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JULY 13, 2017

This First-Generation American Is the First Muslim-Jew to Run for Office

And she's just 25 years old.

Tess Sohngen

By Tess Sohngen

Brought to you by: CHIME FOR CHANGE

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Around the world, fewer than one-quarter of lawmakers are women — an imbalance in representation that affects how laws are crafted and passed and how equality is created in societies. Global Citizen’s series, “Who Run The Gov? Girls!”  chronicles the massive uptick in women running for office, regardless of political party, in the US and around the world, highlighting the candidates and the groups helping them to run, the challenges they face, advice & tips for running, and the results.

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Hannah Risheq stood right on the stage at the Jacobs Javits Center on election night 2016, waiting for what she hoped would be a Hillary Clinton victory speech at the end of the night. The crowd thinned around her as the night grew later and more states turned red.

The 25 year-old left devastated, but a flame ignited in her that night, she told Global Citizen this week. Risheq vowed to protect the diversity of her state. To do so, she decided to run for Congress.

“I’ve got to do something now,” Risheq said she thought to herself following the 2016 election. “The communities I’ve been fighting for my entire life are at the biggest risk right now.”

Take Action: Call on world leaders to support the global action plan to get every girl in school and learning

Risheq is a first-generation American who identifies as both Muslim and Jewish. Her Muslim father immigrated from Palestine to the US, where he met and married Risheq’s mother, a Jewish-American woman. Growing up with two religions and two cultures, Risheq witnessed first hand what it meant to work together toward common interests and common goals.

Risheq and her family experienced first-hand discrimination and hate crimes following the 9/11 attacks. Customers stopped coming to her parents’ restaurant in North Carolina, forcing her family to close the store and move to Virginia.

“My family was really connected to what was going around us, and it was a part of our dinner conversations,” said Risheq.

Her high level of engagement with the world around her continued into her school years and her career as a health consultant for a consulting firm in Virginia. She organized protests after the 2016 election, knowing in the back of her mind she would someday run for office.

Where do the Democratic Candidates for #VA67 stand on the issues? https://t.co/l3gJkDtB27pic.twitter.com/P4kXWl1Esd

That opportunity came this spring. In the Democratic primary for the 67th District of Virginia, Risheq felt that none of the candidates represented her voice or her community’s voice. Only 4%of the legislators in Virginia are under the age of 35, and only 19% are women. Risheq knew that she would be the youngest of them if she were elected at 25 years old.

“If you’re not at the table nobody is going to say your point of view,” Risheq said.

Read More: This Organization Won 70% of Its Political Races in 2016, and It Only Runs Women

Risheq announced her campaign in the last week of March, a short time before the primary elections in June. She was a long-shot candidate against her opponent, Karrie Delaney, 38, who started her campaign in 2016. She and her team of volunteers took the month of April to organize the logistics of the campaign, and by May they had the ball rolling.

Although this was Risheq’s first time running for public office, she was no stranger to political campaigns. She previously volunteered on Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign as well as President Obama’s 2008 and 2012 campaigns.

From her experience knocking on doors for Obama’s campaigns, Risheq felt that voters would see the best version of her by visiting them door to door — she also thought she sounded young talking over the phone. Meeting people face-to-face proved the most fruitful of all her campaign techniques and comprised a large portion of the 13,000 people reached by the campaign.

“A lot of people were interested in a young person running for office,” Risheq said.

But running for office as a young person came with many obstacles. Some people didn’t take her campaign seriously, questioning whether she had enough experience to work for public office. But Risheq felt that her background and experiences as a first generation Jewish-Muslim American and young person made her a qualified candidate.

What are you doing on June 4th? Support Hannah at the #VA67 Candidate Forum! https://t.co/1DkjGqSQiDpic.twitter.com/0CtpdZ5tBV

As she campaigned, Risheq traveled each week to New York, four hours away, to finish her second masters, a degree in social work from Columbia University.

“You have to work much harder than someone just a few years older than you,” Risheq said. “I didn’t carry my resume on my face.”

Read More: What It’s Like to Be a Queer Woman Running for Office

Although Delaney ultimately won the Democratic nomination (she will go head-to-head against Republican incumbent James LeMunyon in November), Risheq reached out to 13,000 people in her district and collected 23% of the votes.

Risheq was not the only woman or young person inspired to run after the 2016 presidential election. Since Donald Trump was elected president back in November, EMILY’s List, a political actioncommitteeforfemale candidates, said it’s heard from over 11,000 women from all 50 statesinterested in running for public office.

Run For Something, another organization that supports and trains people to run for public office, focusing on millennials instead of women, has also seen a rise in young people eager to run for office. And its co-founder, Amanda Litman, sees Risheq as a leader for the next generation, and assisted Risheq in her campaign.

Despite the odds against young candidates challenging older incumbents, other young candidates like Risheq are making headway: Jon Ossoff (30) ran in Georgia; Alexis Frank (26) in South Carolina; and Lindsay Brown (28) ran in New Jersey.

Although she has no plans currently to run again, Risheq is not ruling it out.If she were to run again, she said she would do so with more time and would be the first to announce her campaign.

Until then, she offers this advice to women and young people considering running for office: have your finances in order, and stay positive.

“Continue to be positive because there are going to be a lot of people who doubt you,” Risheq said. “Even if you lose, you will learn a lot about yourself and about your community.”

Tess is an Editorial Intern at Global Citizen. Taking chances on unique opportunities has led her to write for a start-up in London, report for grass root organization in Cincinnati, and volunteer in Zanzibar. Helping create a world in which everyone can achieve wellness, food security, and happiness is her mission.

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About Our Partner

CHIME FOR CHANGE is a global campaign founded by Gucci in 2013 to convene, unite and strengthen the voices speaking out for girls and women around the world. CHIME FOR CHANGE Co-Founders Beyoncé Knowles-Carter and Salma Hayek Pinault continue to lead the campaign with its coalition of partner organizations. In 2015, CHIME announced a long-term partnership with Global Citizen, and together, CHIME FOR CHANGE and Global Citizen have joined forces to take action for gender equality.

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JULY 14, 2017

'The Handmaid’s Tale' Got 13 Emmy Noms — Here’s More Inspiration From Margaret Atwood

“Don't let the bastards grind you down.”

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The 69th primetime Emmy awards nominations were announced on Thursday and Margaret Atwood’s “The Handmaid’s Tale” earned 13 nominations. Avid readers across Canada and the United States likely knew of Atwood before this, but there’s no doubt the Hulu series garnered new attention for the Canadian author.

Regardless of when you tuned it to her works, Atwood’s words are motivating to us all. Here are four times Atwood’s inspired us.

Don't let the bastards grind you down.

Although “The Handmaid’s Tale” is currently Atwood’s most buzzworthy book, the author’s full bibliography is extensive. She has published over 80 works, including 16 novels, eight short fiction publications, eight children’s books, and numerous poems, among many others. 

In "The Handmaid's Tale," Atwood writes “Nolite te bastardes carborundorum.” It's essentially a made-up Latin phrase that roughly translates to “Don’t let the bastards grind you down.” Atwood herself told Time magazine that it was a joke in her Latin classes in school. Still, it has become somewhat of an inspring quote for feminists.

Read More: 10 Books Global Citizens Should Read This Summer

Men are afraid that women will laugh at them. Women are afraid that men will kill them.

Atwood has long been regarded as a feminist writer, even though she has danced around saying that herself. Still, there’s no denying the significance of the heroines in her stories. She has explored women’s struggles in many of her novels and has expressed feminist messages in doing so.

We still think of a powerful man as a born leader and a powerful woman as an anomaly.

“The Edible Woman,” “Surfacing,” “Lady Oracle,” and “Bodily Harm” all deal with female protagonists resisting oppression in some way or another. “The Handmaid’s Tale” is of course one of the more well-known feminist references in her writing.

Although there have been other adaptations of “The Handmaid’s Tale,” the Hulu series has been widely successful — likely because it hits close to home in today’s political climate. It was the most-viewed launch of a show for Hulu and has already been renewed for a second season (due to come out in 2018).

Read More: 5 Must-See Films and Shows For Global Citizens This Week

A word after a word after a word is power.

Atwood is an advocate for environmental issues and a few of her recent novels touch on that. “Oryx & Crake,” and its follow-up novels, “The Year of the Flood,” and “MaddAddam” take place in a sort of post-apocalyptic world. Darren Aronofsky announced a television series will be developed based on the trilogy.

 

 

Jackie Marchildon is a Bilingual Editor at Global Citizen in Toronto.

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The refugee women’s group that’s crafting a better future for their children
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REFUGEES

The refugee women’s group that’s crafting a better future for their children

January 26 2017 | By: GUEST BLOGGER

 
   

Story and photos by Katie G. Nelson

For the members of the Moro Women’s Group in Arua, Uganda, the mission of independence and self-determination is core to their identity. They also happen to be refugees.

Led by Panina Injiwa, a 43-year-old pastor and mother of seven, the all-female collective is a skill-building and income-generating group of South Sudanese refugees. Together, they design, manufacture, and sell handbags and fashion accessories to women around central Africa. And while their output might seem modest — creating and selling only about a dozen products a month – their aspirations of improving future generations by gaining financial independence is what makes the group so unique.

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Arua is situated on the divide between Northern Uganda and South Sudan. As such, it’s a small border town that hosts one of the largest influxes of refugees in the world — nearly 580,000 South Sudanese have entered Uganda since fighting broke out in December 2013 and more than 1,300 new refugees come into the country every day, according to the UN Refugee Agency.

Panina Injiwa is one of those refugees. Originally from the Western Equatoria region of South Sudan, Panina and her children fled to Northern Uganda in 1996 to escape violence.

Like many refugees, Panina lived in Rhino Camp, a sprawling refugee settlement near Arua that currently hosts more than 55,000 refugees from South Sudan.  

Like any parent would, Panina became obsessed with the thought of sending her children to school in hopes of giving them a better life. That hope also resonated with her fellow refugees in Arua.

Undaunted by the lack of jobs for refugees, Panina — armed with basic sewing and beading knowledge and a little money and supplies — begin teaching other refugees how to make beaded handbags and candles, popular among women in Central Africa. Soon, her small group became a 20-woman strong collective, named after the Moro people who live in the Equatoia region of South Sudan.  

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“We sat together to teach them – to train them,”  she says. “When you are taught you are able to do something, to support yourself.” Though the women had successful careers as nutritionists, teachers, and accountants back in South Sudan, they’re now working together to find a way to support their family and make their children’s future a little brighter.

The group hopes they can someday rent an assembly space or even open a store in Arua. But that’s still a distant dream for Panina, who barely has enough money to purchase the supplies needed to make the bags.   

“At least our children are getting an education,” Panina says.  

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Still, Panina finds strength in working with the other women, who echo her goals:

“We are here because we want to come out of poverty,”  said Louise Odid, another group member.  

Annisa Denguru adds: “We need a future for the children, so they don’t have to face the same challenges we are facing now.”  

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January 26 2017

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JULY 14, 2017

Beyoncé and Jay-Z Welcome Two New Global Citizens Into World

Welcome Sir Carter and Rumi Carter!

Meghan Werft

By Meghan Werft

 

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Welcome to the Global Citizen fam, Sir Carter and Rumi Carter.

This morning, Beyoncé posted the first photo of her and Jay-Z’s newborn twins to Instagram, announcing their names for the first time exactly one month after the pair were born. 

The Instagram photo showed Beyoncé draped in a vibrant pink and purple robe holding the newly born boy and girl.

Already, 8 million people have expressed their joy in welcoming Sir Carter and Rumi Carter into the world by liking the post, breaking Instagram records.  

The dynamic Carter couple first took the Global Citizen stage in Central Park in 2014 when Beyoncé surprised the audience by joining Jay-Z for a duet performance that included Beyoncé taking over the part of Justin Timberlake in Jay-Z’s song, “Holy Grail.”  

Read More: Beyoncé Is Starting a 'Formation' Scholarship Program to Give Women a Leg Up

Beyoncé then returned to the stage in 2015 to headline the Global Citizen Festival in Central Park with Ed Sheeran, Pearl Jam, and Coldplay. Her performance was followed by an appearance by former first lady Michelle Obama, who announced her #62MillionGirls campaign to provide education to girls around the world.

“I am honored to follow a woman, whom I admire and adore, someone who believes as passionately as I do in the boundless promise of girls worldwide,” Michelle Obama said onstage. 

Read More: Beyoncé’s #BeyGood4Burundi Campaign Will Bring Clean, Safe Water To Burundi

In 2016, Jay-Z joined Global Citizen in Mumbai with Coldplay, where buzz around their performances led to millions of actions from Global Citizens that resulted in $5.93 billion in commitments to reach 503 million people

And earlier this month, Global Citizen partnered with Beyoncé and her foundation BeyGood to announce #BeyGood4Burundi, a campaign that aims to bring clean water to more than half a million people in Burundi.

Each time Beyoncé and Jay-Z take the stage or make an announcement with Global Citizen, the amplification from their message results in action from global citizens and world leaders. 

Take Action: Girls’ Education Is The Key: Help The Global Partnership For Education Send Girls To School

And with that, we welcome Sir Carter and Rumi Carter into a world where they will have the chance to know a world where extreme poverty doesn’t exist— perhaps before their 18th birthdays. 

Meghan is an Editorial Coordinator at Global Citizen. She studied International Political Economy at the University of Puget Sound before moving to New York. She is a firm believer that education and awareness on interconnected global issues has the power to create a more sustainable, equal world where poverty does not exist.

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What will it take to educate all the world’s girls?
1430
EDUCATION

What will it take to educate all the world’s girls?

June 28 2017 | By: GUEST BLOGGER

GIRLS COUNT

Every girl counts.

130 million girls don’t have access to an education. So we’re asking the world to count them, one by one.

 
  

By Alice Albright, CEO of The Global Partnership for Education

Juliana, an 11-year-old, fifth-grade student from a small village in south-central Côte d’Ivoire, is the first in her family to go to school. Her story is typical of a growing number of girls in her village and across the country who benefit from ambitious government initiatives that seek to strengthen Côte d’Ivoire’s education system and remove barriers that are keeping girls out of school.

Funding from the Global Partnership for Education, which I lead, has made it possible for more of Côte d’Ivoire’s schools to include proper sanitation facilities that allow girls to go to school during their menstruation. And it has made possible the recruitment and training of 38,000 new teachers, many of them women, who often help girls also navigate their challenges at home and in the community.

The result so far: a growing number of Côte d’Ivoire’s children – many of them girls – have enrolled in and completed primary and lower secondary school. Between 2010 and 2014 the primary school completion rate for girls in the country has increased from 39% to 50% – a significant improvement in such a short time.

Aligning GPE and ONE

This is precisely the kind of result that ONE has so vocally and effectively championed. ONE members have done a remarkable job mobilizing around the world to urge donor and developing countries to invest more heavily in girls’ education. And GPE has been a leading catalyst of the sort of interventions ONE champions in its recent must-read policy report on girls’ education.

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ONE Campaign members in New York City on International Women’s Day 2017. (Photo credit: ONE)

As the Côte d’Ivoire example shows, GPE supports governments’ efforts to assess and address the many barriers that the ONE report rightly recognizes are keeping girls from going to school – such as deeply held beliefs against educating girls; work; marriage for girls barely into their teens; school fees; long, arduous commutes to school; sexual assault; lack of sanitary facilities for menstruating girls; and humanitarian crises that interrupt schooling.[1]

GPE also emphasizes the need for a “data revolution,” which is exactly in line with ONE’s calls for more and better monitoring of educational progress. In fact, GPE’s funding model offers incentives to developing countries to build and improve education monitoring, strengthen long-range planning, promote transparency and accountability and drive for results.

And, as the ONE report points out, investing in teachers is essential. One of GPE’s priorities – as it has been in Côte d’Ivoire – is to help countries expand the number of teachers who are well-trained and qualified to inspire and challenge students. We place particular importance on governments recruiting and training female teachers, who can give girls the confidence and support they need to stay in school and thrive.

Challenges remain

Since 2000, the number of girls not attending school has plunged by 40% from more than 200 million worldwide. That’s pretty good progress. But with 130 million girls still not in school and millions more who go to school but don’t learn the basics, there’s still a lot more work to do.

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Students at Nyange Secondary School, Kilombero Region, Tanzania. (Photo credit: Sam Vox/ONE)

As the ONE report notes, the success of the girls’ education revolution over the next 15 years will depend on the extent to which developing countries and wealthier donor countries commit the resources needed to implement quality sector plans and proven approaches.

Countries like Côte d’Ivoire, which has steadily raised its own domestic spending on education to about 7.3% of its GDP[2], are increasingly doing their part. But aid to education from the world’s richest nations dropped from 13% of total aid in 2002 to 10% in 2014.

If that trend continues, according to The International Commission for Financing Global Education Opportunities, educational progress – for girls and boys alike – in developing countries will fall short of reaching the UN Sustainable Development goal of education for all by 2030.

Replenishing the Global Partnership for Education

The Education Commission has called on donor countries to mobilize a step change in their financing for global education. The Commission’s recommendations includes helping GPE increase its fund to $2 billion a year by 2020 and $4 billion a year by 2030.

To achieve this ambitious goal, GPE is campaigning right now for funding of $3.1 billion from existing and new donors for its upcoming replenishment for 2018 to 2020. Over the next three years, this would enable the partnership to support 89 countries, which are home to 870 million children and adolescents and 78% of the world’s out–of-school children.

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Students at Nyange Secondary School, Kilombero Region, Tanzania. (Photo credit: Sam Vox/ONE)

After 15 years of experience working in countries like Côte d’Ivoire, we know how to help countries educate more girls and we have the tools in place to ensure effective support to such countries. That’s why it’s so important for leaders around the world to heed the call from leading voices like ONE: without sufficient resources for those interventions, we risk leaving girls like Juliana behind and squandering the full intellectual, economic and social potential that educated girls can deliver.

[1] http://www.globalpartnership.org/blog/breaking-down-barriers-girls-education
[2] http://www.globalpartnership.org/blog/benefits-national-education-accounts

Every girl counts.

130 million girls don’t have access to an education. So we’re asking the world to count them, one by one.

JOIN THE COUNT

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