Jump to content
tan_lejos_tan_cerca

The Action Thread Part Two

Recommended Posts

Skip to content
Meet the moms who became entrepreneurs to heal from Ebola
50
EDUCATION

Meet the moms who became entrepreneurs to heal from Ebola

23 August 2017 11:31AM UTC | By: GUEST BLOGGER

JOIN

Join the fight against extreme poverty

 
  

By Imogen Calderwood, Street Child

Sierra Leone may have been declared Ebola-free, but some of the epidemic’s most lasting legacies still haunt the country.

One of the greatest and most far-reaching of these legacies is deepened poverty and its impact on education.

Families who were already struggling to get by before the epidemic now have to cope with the loss of their main breadwinners, meaning education is often pushed far down families’ lists of priorities.

Survivors of Ebola often have to support the extra children of family members who died; they have to run businesses in the country’s devastated economy, and they have to face many more challenges as the country continues to fight the impact of the virus.

Research by the charity Street Child revealed that more than 12,000 children lost their main caregiver to Ebola, and 1,400 children in Sierra Leone have been identified as seriously-at-risk.

With no one to care for them, these children’s chances of finishing their education are next to nothing.

Mabel-Cauker-Family-Business-Scheme-Bo-6

Mabel Cauker and family.

Mabel, from Bo, is one of the mothers struggling to cope without the support of her relatives, killed by Ebola.

She was left to care for the whole family after the death of her sister, a nurse and the family’s breadwinner. Mabel now cares for seven children between the ages of two and 16, four of whom are her nieces and nephews.

“My sister Mary was a nurse,” said Mabel. “She was the main breadwinner for our family. She took care of all of us. When she died, she left behind four children, who I now care for alongside my own.

“Sadly, just after losing my sister, my husband got sick and ran away. He never returned. We heard a rumour that he’s dead.”

Mabel received a grant from Street Child, as part of their Livelihoods Programme, and was able to set up a business selling fish. With the profits, she can send the children she cares for to school.

Joseph is one of the nephews that now lives with Mabel after the death of his mother.

“During Ebola I was isolated and stigmatised because of the quarantine,’” he said. “It was really hard. My hope for the future is to finish my education and become a lawyer so that I can help my family out of poverty. Education has taught me to read and write and to develop my family. It will help them develop their lives too.”

Tommy-Family-Family-Business-Scheme-Bo-5

The Tommy Family

Manu, 40, Mamie, 45, and Nancy, 35, from Bo, were also left struggling to cope.

They are the three wives of Foday Tommy, who used to dispense medicines at the government hospital before he was killed by Ebola, and between them, they now look after 26 children.

“Foday set out one morning and then started feeling ill at work and so they admitted him right away,” said Manu. “He died two days later so he never came home. We weren’t even allowed to see the body and it was only later that they told us where the grave was.”

The family was quarantined for 21 days, with tape around the house and an armed police guard to make sure they didn’t leave. But while they were quarantined, their eldest son got ill and also died so the family were shut inside the house for a further 21 days. They relied on the food brought to them by the government.

“We were stigmatised, the whole community rejected us,” Manu said. “They looked at us like we were the virus. It was so sad. I would have preferred to be dead than live in that situation again.”

Manu-Tommy-Family-Business-Scheme-Bo-571

Manu Tommy

The three women have been able to set up a business selling groceries with the support of Street Child and their Livelihoods Programme, which gives grants and training to help families get back on their feet. With their profits, the three women have been able to send their children back to school.

“The business is growing gradually but it’s still tough when you have this many children and you have no husband,” said Nancy.

“Without this, we would have had to go back to gardening work alone, which doesn’t bring in enough to feed the family. Thankfully, all our children are now in school because our business pays for school fees. Education is their only hope for a better future.”

Street Child CEO Tom Dannatt said: “Ebola may be done, but its impacts will last a very long time. Poverty is the biggest barrier to children learning in Sierra Leone, so unless we help families out of poverty, their children remain out of school. It is likely that their life prospects will be bleak as a result.”

He added: “Unless programmes like our Livelihoods Scheme can deliver timely support, this still risks being one of Ebola’s worst legacies.”

Between 2015 and 2016, more than 12,000 grants were given by Street Child to families severely impacted by the Ebola crisis. These grants helped to ensure that more than 20,000 children were sustainably enrolled in school after the outbreak.

To find out more about Street Child’s work in Sierra Leone — as well as Liberia, Nigeria and Nepal — visit their website here.

Join the fight against extreme poverty

Name
Email
Post/zip code
Country         Select country Afghanistan Åland Albania Algeria American Samoa Andorra Angola Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory British Virgin Islands Brunei Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos Islands Colombia Comoros Cook Islands Costa Rica Côte d'Ivoire Country of Sint Maarten Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Democratic Republic of the Congo Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guam Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Kosovo Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Laos Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macau Macedonia Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Micronesia Moldova Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands Netherlands Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island North Korea Northern Mariana Islands Norway Oman Pakistan Palau Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Republic of the Congo Reunion Romania Russia Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino São Tomé and Príncipe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Korea South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu U.S. Virgin Islands Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Vatican City Venezuela Vietnam Wallis and Futuna Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe       
 

Share

 SHARE ON FACEBOOK
 SAVE FOR LATER
 SHARE ON TWITTER

AUTHOR

GUEST BLOGGER
23 August 2017 11:31AM UTC

Join the Conversation

Comment Guidelines

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Skip to content
 
372
HEALTH

How foreign aid helped make progress in fighting tropical diseases

April 20 2017 | By: SAMANTHA URBAN

#DEFENDAID

Aid works.

USAID and its partners have delivered more than 1.6 billion treatments to more than 743 million people with NTDs. Aid works. Call your elected official today and ask them to reject President Trump’s proposed cuts to foreign aid.

 
  

Neglected tropical diseases, or NTDs, are parasitic and bacterial diseases that can cause severe pain and long-term disability. In 2015, more than 1.5 billion of the world’s poorest people needed treatment or care for NTDs. That’s more than HIV, TB, and malaria combined. They cause severe pain, long-term disability, and are the cause of death for more than 170,000 people per year.

In 2006, President George W. Bush launched an initiative to combat NTDs that was implemented by the U.S. Agency for International Development, or USAID. The program initially focused on five countries (Burkina Faso, Ghana, Mali, Niger and Uganda) but ultimately expanded to support 31 countries in Africa, Asia, and Latin America and the Caribbean.

So… ten years later, can we say the program worked? Yes! Over the past decade, USAID and its partners have delivered more than 1.6 billion treatments to more than 743 million people! According to USAID, “the U.S. is charting a new course for people, families, and communities around the world, making it possible to imagine a future free from those diseases.”

For example, as a result of the support provided by USAID — which is less than 1% of the total U.S. budget — 140 million people now live in areas where they are no longer at risk of acquiring lymphatic filariasis, a painful and profoundly disfiguring parasitic infection transmitted by mosquitoes.

Here’s another example: Trachoma is the leading infectious cause of preventable blindness. Today, thanks to USAID-supported interventions, 65 million people live in areas where trachoma is no longer a public health problem! In fact, by 2020, 70% of USAID-supported countries are on track to stop treatment for both lymphatic filariasis and trachoma!

Preventing and controlling NTDs is crucial to ending extreme poverty in the next two decades. That’s yet another reason why protecting the U.S. foreign aid budget is so important. Aid works — and we shouldn’t allow the progress we’ve made to stall now. Call your elected official today and ask him or her to #DefendAid.

Aid works.

USAID and its partners have delivered more than 1.6 billion treatments to more than 743 million people with NTDs. Aid works. Call your elected official today and ask them to reject President Trump’s proposed cuts to foreign aid.

CALL NOW

Share

 SHARE ON FACEBOOK
 SAVE FOR LATER
 SHARE ON TWITTER

AUTHOR

SAMANTHA URBAN
April 20 2017

Join the Conversation

Comment Guidelines

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Skip to content
Meet the Kenyan scientist who overcame gender stereotypes to fight malaria
11225

Meet the Kenyan scientist who overcame gender stereotypes to fight malaria

18 August 2016 1:03PM UTC | By: GUEST BLOGGER

JOIN

Join the fight against extreme poverty

 
  
At the vaccination ward, child Joan Medza has her weight taken.

On the vaccination ward, child Joan Medza has her weight taken.

By Katie G. Nelson

Growing up in Nairobi, Kenya, Dr. Faith Osier often dreamed of curing the world of deadly diseases like malaria, an illness spread by mosquitos that kills more than 438,000 people every year.

Several decades later, Osier, now 43, is at the forefront of the fight against malaria, spearheading the development of a vaccine that she believes could someday wipe out the disease.

The swaying palm trees and pristine beaches of Kenya’s coastal town of Kilifi is a beach-lover’s paradise. But away from the white-sand beaches and crystal clear water waits a serious and often deadly parasite—one that caused more than 10 percent of all Kilifi residents to fall ill last year.

But Osier believes that number could someday go down to zero.

Osier has worked out of Kilifi for the last 12 years, partnering with the Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI), Wellcome Trust, and the Kilifi County Hospital to develop a vaccine for malaria, which is endemic in most parts of Kenya’s coast.

FOsier

Osier first became intrigued by the idea of a vaccine—or more specifically, the ability to develop resistance to malaria—after working in the paediatric ward of the Kilifi County Hospital.

“Malaria is a very big problem, especially for Africa,” says Osier. “What we see in people who live in Africa is that it’s children under the age of 5 who get frequently ill—severely ill—and can die. But in the same areas, the adults seem to be resistant,” she adds. “They don’t seem to become ill or die.”

Aiming to better understand how adults acquire a resistance to malaria, Osier began studying how the body responds to the infection at different stages. Focusing on the role of antibodies— proteins created by the immune system to neutralise harmful substances, like infections—Osier dug into the complexities surrounding the ability to thwart malaria.

“We study people who are being exposed to malaria,” she says. “We look at their blood and their antibody responses and how they are responding. We know that antibodies are very important… and we believe that antibodies hold the key.”

At the vaccination ward, baby Sleiman Hamisi has his weight taken, the data inputted into the database, and then receives a vaccination.

Baby Sleiman Hamisi receives a vaccination.

While the molecular intricacies of proteins, antibodies and antigens might seem like the researcher’s biggest obstacle, Osier’s role as a female researcher in a male-dominated profession often presents an equally steep challenge, she says.

Osier said there have been many points in her career when she felt inhibited simply because she was a woman.

“(As a female) you’re conditioned to believe that (hard skills) are not for you,” she says. “It takes some help to shake that off and to say ‘Look! There’s someone who can do it! If they can, then so can I.’”

“I let my work speak for me,” she says.

But while her climb toward success has provided unique challenges, Osier is quick to add that being a female scientist also has its strengths.

“I bring a lot more compassion to my management and leadership skills and believe that I bring out the best in my team members because of this; in return they give back more than 100 percent,” she says. “That has been key to both my progress and theirs.”

But it’s not only her colleagues who recognise Osier’s work ethic and compassion-based leadership. In 2014, Osier won the Royal Society Pfizer Prize award, one of the most prestigious prizes in African science.

Calling it her “biggest achievement,” Osier says the award “gave me a real sense of satisfaction that with hard work, determination and vision, it was possible to achieve great things.”

At the vaccination ward, baby Sleiman Hamisi has his weight taken, the data inputted into the database, and then receives a vaccination.

At the vaccination ward, baby Sleiman Hamisi has his weight taken, the data inputted into the database.

While hard work and dedication remain the foundation to Osier’s career, the researcher is also quick to credit the role of mentors in her success.

“Mentors are really important. You can’t dream of something you can’t see,” she said.

That’s why it’s so important to expose young girls to “hard skills” like medicine and research, she said

“It’s exposure. It’s making research more visible and specifically targeting women,” she said. “In schools, in public meetings, village meetings… just letting girls see that they can be more than what the community is telling them.”

It’s that same urge to rise above obstacles that will help Osier achieve her ultimate goal: developing a highly effective malaria vaccine that is available, free of charge, to the poorest communities in rural Africa.

“I want women in our African villages to have the opportunity to take their children for vaccination against malaria and be able to move on with malaria behind them,” she says.

But how long will the world wait for a malaria vaccine?

“I’m confident that it will happen in my lifetime,” Osier said.

Dr. Faith Osier is a Kenyan scientist at the KEMRI Wellcome Trust Research Programme and Visiting Professor at the University of Oxford.

TAKE ACTION: Tell world leaders to support the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB, and Malaria!

Join the fight against extreme poverty

Name
Email
Post/zip code
Country         Select country Afghanistan Åland Albania Algeria American Samoa Andorra Angola Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory British Virgin Islands Brunei Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos Islands Colombia Comoros Cook Islands Costa Rica Côte d'Ivoire Country of Sint Maarten Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Democratic Republic of the Congo Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guam Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Kosovo Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Laos Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macau Macedonia Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Micronesia Moldova Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands Netherlands Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island North Korea Northern Mariana Islands Norway Oman Pakistan Palau Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Republic of the Congo Reunion Romania Russia Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino São Tomé and Príncipe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Korea South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu U.S. Virgin Islands Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Vatican City Venezuela Vietnam Wallis and Futuna Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe       
 

Share

 SHARE ON FACEBOOK
 SAVE FOR LATER
 SHARE ON TWITTER

AUTHOR

GUEST BLOGGER
18 August 2016 1:03PM UTC

Join the Conversation

Comment Guidelines

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Global Citizen is a community of people like you

People who want to learn about and take action on the world’s biggest challenges. Extreme poverty ends with you.

Learn more
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEPT. 1, 2017

An Ethiopian Mother Was the Victim of a Shocking Acid Attack

“I don't know why my husband did this. I just opened the door and it happened.”

Daniele Selby

By Daniele Selby

Brought to you by: CHIME FOR CHANGE

  •  
  •  
  •  
 

Two months ago, Atsede Nigussiem opened the door to her estranged husband, and, in a moment, her life changed.

To her shock, her husband Haimanot Kahsai suddenly poured acid all over her face.

Her 5-year-old son was sleeping in the house as his father fled and his mother ran into the street calling out for help, according to the Daily Mail.

Read more: Acid Attacks Are on the Rise in London: Here’s What You Should Do If You Witness One

Nigussiem, 26, had been at her parents’ home in Tigray, Ethiopia, when her husband of five years knocked on the door and launched the acid attack. The couple had lost contact after Kahsai moved to Yemen for work in February, according to the Daily Mail.

“I don't know why my husband did this,” Nigussiem writes, no longer able to speak. “I just opened the door and it happened. I'm heartbroken and in pain.”

Nigussiem was rushed to the hospital, but her burns are extensive.

Read more: Acid Attack Victims, Cast Out by Society, Are Helping Each Other Thrive

She has lost sight in one eye and is close to losing sight in the other. Her mouth has been melted shut, so she is only able to eat and drink through a straw. And the burns on her face, chest, back of her head, and legs mean she is constantly in pain.

Her severe wounds require attention from specialists, so she is now in Bangkok, Thailand where doctors are working to save her remaining eyesight and treat her skin. Though Nigussiem reported the attack to the police, 29-year-old Kahsai had already fled.

Ethiopia’s laws do not explicitly mention acid or corrosive substances, except in instances of terrorist attacks, according to its criminal code. Acid attacks are often perpetrated against women in domestic violence or so-called “honor-based” violence incidents.

Read more: Honor Killings: Everything You Should Know, and Why They Aren't Honorable

Though these attacks happen around the world to both men and women, they are most prevalent in Bangladesh and India, where victims are most commonly women, according to the Avon Global Center for Women and Justice. In 2014, 130 women were victims of acid attacks in India, according to the Acid Survivors Foundation India.

Gender-based violence is pervasive in Ethiopia, according to UNICEF; however, acid attacks are rare.

The last incident to make international headlines occurred in 2007 when a 21-year-old student had acid thrown at her by a man who had stalked her over the course of four years, according to Reuters. She had attempted to report her stalker to the police, but was told she needed witnesses.

The incident drew attention to the failure of Ethiopia’s legislation to adequately protect girls and women. Global Citizen campaigns #LeveltheLaw, to reform such laws and repeal laws that discriminate against women. You can take action here

Nigussiem awaits a series of surgeries that will hopefully be able to save her skin and reduce her pain.

"Thankfully now she is the best place with one of the world's best doctors looking after her,” the hospital’s regional manager Masha Zhigunova said. “We're all supporting her."

Daniele is an Editorial Coordinator at Global Citizen. She believes that education and the equal provision of human rights will empower change. She studied music and psychology at Vassar before earning her Masters of International Affairs at Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs. Daniele brings with her an unhealthy love of chili and chocolate, and a small, fluffy dog from the Little Red Dot (Singapore) to the Big Apple.

  •  
  •  
  •  
chime-logo_container.jpg
About Our Partner

CHIME FOR CHANGE is a global campaign founded by Gucci in 2013 to convene, unite and strengthen the voices speaking out for girls and women around the world. The campaign uses innovative approaches to promote gender equality. Co-founded by Beyoncé Knowles-Carter and Salma Hayek Pinault, CHIME FOR CHANGE works with a coalition of partner organizations, including the Kering Foundation, Facebook, and Hearst Magazines.

Sign up to receive alerts about the world's biggest challenges.
 
Sign up

What's Trending In Girls & Women

Aug. 31, 2017

More than 40% of married women aged 15 to 49 experience domestic violence. Read More

Aug. 31, 2017

Two men will write and direct it. Read More

Aug. 30, 2017

From money to rice, no trade can be justified. Read More

 
 
JOIN THE CONVERSATION
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

© 2012-2017 Global Poverty Project, Inc All Rights Reserved

 
This site uses cookies to provide you with the best experience. Read more.
×
 
×
Global Citizen
Global Citizen
FREE - In Google Play
VIEW

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Global Citizen is a community of people like you

People who want to learn about and take action on the world’s biggest challenges. Extreme poverty ends with you.

Learn more
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEPT. 1, 2017

Hajj, Flooding & War: 15 Powerful Photos That Capture What Happened This Week

The last week of August has seen the aftermath of floods, the start of Eid al-Adha and more.

Gabriella Canal

By Gabriella Canal  and  Olivia Kestin

 

  •  
  •  
  •  
hurricane-harvey-flooding-houston.jpgGerald Herbert/AP
 

This last week of August, catastrophic floods have sent people all around the world searching for higher ground.

Hurricane Harvey has gone down in history as one of the United States’ most disastrous natural disasters, leaving 32,000 people in southeastern Texas to seek shelter and at least 19 peopledead. Meanwhile, southeast Asia has faced one of the worst flooding disasters in years. International aid agencies announced that thousands of villages have been cut off indefinitely, deprived of food and clean water.

Ahead of the Eid al-Adha Muslim holiday, over 27,000 Rohingya Muslims in Myanmar have crossed the border into Bangladesh as ethnic violence against the minority has reached an all time high.  

Global Citizen brings you pictures from this week and more: 


1) Hurricane Harvey: (Above) Demetres Fair holds a towel over his daughter Damouri Fair, 2, as they are rescued by boat by members of the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries and the Houston Fire Department during flooding from Tropical Storm Harvey in Houston, Monday, Aug. 28, 2017.

Rohingya-Myanmar-Refugees.jpgImage: Mushfiqul Alam/AP

2) Rohingya Refugees: Myanmar's Rohingya Muslim ethnic minority children stretch their hands out to receive food distributed by locals at the Kutupalong makeshift refugee camp in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, Wednesday, Aug. 30, 2017. Thousands of Rohingya Muslims have fled fresh violence in Myanmar and crossed into Bangladesh in less than a week, with hundreds stranded in no man's land at the countries' border, the International Organization for Migration said Wednesday.

 

3) Afghanistan Eid-al-Adha Festival: Afghan men shop for livestock at a market ahead of the Eid al-Adha Muslim festival, on the outskirts of Jalalabad, on August 29, 2017. Muslims across the world are preparing to celebrate the annual festival of Eid al-Adha, or the Festival of Sacrifice, which marks the end of the Hajj pilgrimage to Mecca and in commemoration of Prophet Abraham's readiness to sacrifice his son to show obedience to God.

 

4) Syria Eid al-Adha: Syrian refugees wait on August 28, 2017 at the Oncupinar crossing gate, close to the town of Kilis, south central Turkey, as they wait to cross to Syria for the Eid al-Adha Muslim holiday. Turkish authorities allow Syrian refugees to visit their country for Eid-Al-Adha (Feast of the Sacrifice) celebrations.

Hajj-Pilgrimage-Saudi-Arabia.jpgImage: Khalil Hamra/AP

5) Hajj Pilgrimage: Muslim pilgrims pray at the Grand Mosque, ahead of the annual Hajj pilgrimage in the Muslim holy city of Mecca, Saudi Arabia, Tuesday, Aug. 29, 2017.

 

6) Syrian Conflict: Syrian girls pose for a photograph against a bullet-riddled wall in the rebel-held village of Kafr Ghan, in the northern countryside of Aleppo, on August 28, 2017.

Hurricane-Harvey-Texas-Flooding-2.jpgImage: Charlie Riedel/AP

7) Houston Flooding: People push a stalled pickup through a flooded street in Houston, after Tropical Storm Harvey dumped heavy rains, Sunday, Aug. 27, 2017. The remnants of Harvey sent devastating floods pouring into Houston on Sunday as rising water chased thousands of people to rooftops or higher ground.

Venezuela-Political-Crisis.jpgImage: Ricardo Mazalan/AP

8) Venezuela Political Crisis: A follower of President Nicolas Maduro runs past a line of soldiers in Caracas, Venezuela, Saturday, Aug. 26, 2017. Authorities have shut down two radio stations that aired critical coverage of President Maduro's government by refusing to renew their licenses, a broadcast executive announced, as the country staged military exercises in defiance of Washington and new U.S. sanctions.

 

9) Floating Vegetable Market of Kashmir: Kashmiri men gather with their boats laden with vegetables at the floating vegetable market on Dal Lake at dawn on August 28, 2017 in Srinagar, the summer capital of Indian administered Kashmir, India. Every morning Dal dwellers visit the floating vegetable market, at Guder, in the centre of the lake at the crack of dawn, with their boats laden with vegetables that supply different parts of the city. Most of the produce sold here is grown in floating gardens on the Dal Lake. The rich ecosystem of this wetland produces plenty of tomatoes, cucumbers and Nadru. The haggling and exchange all last hardly an hour, soon after everyone disappears as if the market never existed.

 

10) Rohingya Refugees: Rohingya people pass with their belongings over the Bangladesh-Myanmar border fence as they try to enter Bangladesh in Coxs Bazar, Bangladesh on August 28, 2017. UN refugee agency said more than 3,000 people had arrived in the past three days.

 

11) Migrants in Italy: An evicted family stands by a tent in the atrium of the Church of the Twelve Holy Apostles in central Rome on August 27, 2017. Evicted families layed tents in the atrium of a famed 6th-century church in the heart of Rome after one of many forced evictions left hundreds with nowhere to go. Italy is also set to issue new guidelines on refugee evictions after the UN criticised the ousting of hundreds of people from a Rome building last week, local media reported.

Hurricane-Harvey-Flooding-Texas.jpgImage: David J. Phillip/AP

12) Tropical Storm Harvey: Interstate 69 is covered by floodwaters from Tropical Storm Harvey Tuesday, Aug. 29, 2017, in Humble, Texas.

 

13) Syrian-Lebanese Border Conflict: Ina  picture taken on an army-organized press tour, Lebanese army soldiers with the 6th Brigade driving a buggy bearing the Lebanese flag in an area they recently took from the Islamic State (IS) group in Jurud Ras Baalbek on the Syrian-Lebanese border on August 28, 2017.

Libya-Migrant-Refugee-Crisis.jpgImage: Darko Bandic/AP

14) Mediterranean Migrant Crisis: Rescuers transfer African migrants to a rescue boat during a rescue operation from the Aquarius vessel of SOS Mediterranee NGO and MSF (Doctors Without Borders) in the sea some 25 Nautical miles (29 miles, 46 kilometers) north of the Libyan coast, Sunday, Aug. 27, 2017. 

India-Flooding.jpgImage: Rajanish Kakade/AP

15) South Asia Flooding: People walk through a waterlogged street following heavy rains in Mumbai, India, Tuesday, Aug. 29, 2017. Heavy rains Tuesday brought Mumbai to a halt flooding vast areas of the city.

 

Gabriella Canal studied Journalism and International Relations at the University of Miami. She has built a record of seeking out opportunities she feels strongly passionate about, and that require her to help inspire change. Social justice, writing, photography and videography are her passions. Sharing the stories of those affected by the world's biggest challenges in an effort to alleviate their conditions is her mission.

Olivia Kestin is a Photo Editor for Global Citizen. She studied Political Science and Journalism at George Washington University, with an emphasis on Photojournalism. Previously she covered domestic and international news as a Photo Editor with MSNBC.

  •  
  •  
  •  
Sign up to receive alerts about the world's biggest challenges.
 
Sign up

What's Trending In Citizenship

Aug. 28, 2017

Sometimes, humor is the best medicine. Read More

Aug. 24, 2017

We can all learn something from the Scots. Read More

Aug. 30, 2017

The clock is ticking. Read More

 
 
JOIN THE CONVERSATION
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

© 2012-2017 Global Poverty Project, Inc All Rights Reserved

 
This site uses cookies to provide you with the best experience. Read more.
×
 
×
Global Citizen
Global Citizen
FREE - In Google Play
VIEW

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Global Citizen is a community of people like you

People who want to learn about and take action on the world’s biggest challenges. Extreme poverty ends with you.

Learn more
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEPT. 1, 2017

Scotland Is Set to Pardon Men Convicted of Homosexual Acts Under ‘Turing Law’

It will follow England and Wales.

Imogen Calderwood
  •  
  •  
  •  
 

Scotland is set to join England and Wales in pardoning men who were convicted of same-sex offences when homosexuality was still a crime. 

The Scottish government will announce a new bill next week, reports the BBC . If the bill is approved by parliament, all those who had been convicted of homosexuality in Scotland will be pardoned. 

It’s expected that up to 5,000 men, both living and dead, could be pardoned by Scotland’s introduction of the so-called “Turing law” — named after World War Two code-breaker Alan Turing, who was pardoned in 2013. 

Read more: These 6 Countries Execute People for Being Gay

England and Wales passed the Turing law in January 2017 , pardoning 50,000 gay and bisexual men who were convicted before homosexuality between men aged over 21 was decriminalised in 1967. Scotland decriminalised homosexuality in 1980.

Those with convictions who are still alive will also be able to apply for a “disregard,” which would remove convictions from their record.

While the pardon will be automatic, the “disregard” would need to be applied for in order to check that the offences aren’t ones which are still illegal — for example, non-consensual sex, or sex with a minor. 

Global Citizen campaigns to achieve the Global Goals, including goal No.10 for reduced inequalities. You can take action with us here 

 

Take Action: Take Quiz

 
 

 



United StatesUnited KingdomGermanyCanadaAustraliaAfghanistanÅland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBruneiBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCabo VerdeCambodiaCameroonCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo (the Democratic Republic of the)Cook IslandsCosta RicaCôte d'IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands  [Malvinas]Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambia (The)GeorgiaGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuamGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and McDonald IslandsHoly See  [Vatican City State]HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIranIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKuwaitKyrgyzstanLaosLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedoniaMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMicronesia (the Federated States of)MoldoviaMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorth KoreaNorthern Mariana IslandsNorwayOmanPakistanPalauPalestine, State ofPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarRéunionRomaniaRussiaRwandaSaint BarthélemySaint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth KoreaSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyriaTaiwanTajikistanTanzaniaThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited States Minor Outlying IslandsUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuelaVietnamVirgin Islands (British)Virgin Islands (U.S.)Wallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabwe 

 

The Scottish bill is slightly different to the new legislation in England and Wales, which only “automatically” pardons men who died before February this year.

“The problem in England is that if you were still alive on February 1 this year then there is no provision for an automatic pardon,” Tim Hopkins, director of the Equality Network, told the BBC 

“The only way to do it there is to apply via a detailed application form which many people feel adds insult to injury.” 

Read more: 50,000 Gay Men Pardoned In UK Under ‘Turing Law’

alan-turing-flickrImage: Flickr/CyberHades

The law was informally named after Turing, who was convicted of “gross indecency” in 1952 and was chemically castrated, before committing suicide in 1954. 

Turing’s family and gay rights groups campaigned for pardons for other men historically convicted. Before the 2015 elections, they presented a petition with nearly 500,000 signatures to Downing Street. 

The law would only be applied to men because gay women weren’t criminalised. 

Imogen is content writer & editor at Global Citizen UK. A former global news journalist, Imogen has been flitting from Australia to Spain to India since graduating from the University of Warwick. She's also trying to read all the Booker Prize winners, so wish her luck because there are loads.

  •  
  •  
  •  
Sign up to receive alerts about the world's biggest challenges.
 
Sign up

What's Trending In Citizenship

Aug. 28, 2017

Sometimes, humor is the best medicine. Read More

Aug. 24, 2017

We can all learn something from the Scots. Read More

Aug. 30, 2017

The clock is ticking. Read More

 
 
JOIN THE CONVERSATION
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

© 2012-2017 Global Poverty Project, Inc All Rights Reserved

 
This site uses cookies to provide you with the best experience. Read more.
×
×
Global Citizen
Global Citizen
FREE - In Google Play
VIEW

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Global Citizen is a community of people like you

People who want to learn about and take action on the world’s biggest challenges. Extreme poverty ends with you.

Learn more
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEPT. 1, 2017

Proving She's a Hero in Real Life, Too, Gal Gadot Stands Up for 2 Body-Shamed Women

She’s Wonder Woman IRL.

Tess Sohngen

By Tess Sohngen

 

  •  
  •  
  •  
 

Since hitting the big screen this summer, the blockbuster action film Wonder Woman has empowered young women to be strong-minded and independent.

That’s why Sri Lankan cosplayers Seshani Cooray and Amaya Suriyapperuma were drawn to the DC Comics character.

The two lifelong friends dressed up as Wonder Women at Sri Lanka’s Lanka Comic Con, but one day later, their pictures were spread around Facebook, where the women were mocked and body-shamed.

Demeaning online memes called the girls “too skinny” to be wearing the Wonder Woman costume and commenters compared the two girls’ bodies against each other.

Cooray and Suriyapperuma were shocked when their friend showed them the memes.

“I had never been face-to-face with cyber bullying of this scale,” Suriyapperuma told the Hindustan Times.

“[Amaya's] body was being compared to mine," Cooray added, "and I couldn’t do anything."

Gal Gadot, the actress who portrayed Wonder Woman, has shown her support for girls and women inspired by her DC character. When she learned about the two girls who donned the superheroine’s costume, she tweeted her support for the two girls and ignored the cyber bullying.

Cyber-bullying and violence against girls and women is a global concern and, according to the United Nations, this practice is on the rise, threatening peace and the sustainable development, according to the United Nations.

Global Citizen campaigns on women’s empowerment, knowing that women are essential to ending extreme poverty. You can take action here.

Instead of responding to the hate and criticism, the two girls and the whole Sri Lanka geek community worked together to report and take down as many of the memes they could find. They received overwhelming support from the Geek Club of Sri Lanka’s Facebook page, which helped to remove some of the memes.

On Twitter, reactions to the college girls’ pictures started to change to show more support and praise.

Since then, posts of support for the two girls spread across the web, overshadowing the once objectifying and demeaning memes. Three days after the first supportive tweet, the photo received over 60,000 likes and over 42,000 retweets. Others adopted the girls’ photo into the promotional image for the Wonder Woman movie.

Their pictures soon captured the attention and support of Patti Jenkins and Gal Gadot.

The girls were ecstatic to have their pictures recognized by the Wonder Woman star and director, but they were also happy to see the wave of resistance against online bullying and body-shaming that grew from their pictures.

"When I was informed that Patty Jenkins [had] tweeted our picture and praised our efforts," Cooray told the Hindustan Times, "I joined Twitter and read the post again and again to get back my confidence."

“The film didn’t focus on the superhuman’s gender, and the character believed in fighting hate with love,” Suri told BBC. “If people start seeing women being strong as a normal thing — which is what the movie tried to do as well as what I want — then more and more women will stop tolerating harassment."

Wonder Woman’s lesson to Fight hate with love rang true for the two girls, showing that empowering women can mean learning to be strong minded and independent as well as standing together against hate.

Tess is an Editorial Intern at Global Citizen. Taking chances on unique opportunities has led her to write for a start-up in London, report for grass root organization in Cincinnati, and volunteer in Zanzibar. Helping create a world in which everyone can achieve wellness, food security, and happiness is her mission.

  •  
  •  
  •  
Sign up to receive alerts about the world's biggest challenges.
 
Sign up

What's Trending In Girls & Women

Aug. 31, 2017

More than 40% of married women aged 15 to 49 experience domestic violence. Read More

Aug. 31, 2017

Two men will write and direct it. Read More

Aug. 30, 2017

From money to rice, no trade can be justified. Read More

 
 
JOIN THE CONVERSATION
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

© 2012-2017 Global Poverty Project, Inc All Rights Reserved

 
This site uses cookies to provide you with the best experience. Read more.
×
 
×
Global Citizen
Global Citizen
FREE - In Google Play
VIEW

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Global Citizen is a community of people like you

People who want to learn about and take action on the world’s biggest challenges. Extreme poverty ends with you.

Learn more
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AUG. 31, 2017

The 'World’s No.1 Anti-Vaxxer' Was Denied an Australian Visa

“People who are telling parents that their kids shouldn't be vaccinated are dangerous people.”

Daniele Selby

By Daniele Selby

 

  •  
  •  
  •  
vaccines_un_photojc_mcilwaine.jpgUN Photo/JC McIlwaine
 

American author and anti-vaccine advocate Kent Heckenlively won’t be visiting the Land Down Under this December. 

The Australian government has declined to issue Heckenlively, who describes himself as the “world’s No.1 anti-vaxxer,” a visa to enter the country for his speaking tour.

“Kent’s not got any travel plans to Australia because we’re not going to allow him to come here – we’re not going to issue a visa for this particular individual,” Immigration Minister Peter Dutton told Sydney-based radio station 2GB. “It’s clear to me that it’s not in our national interest that he should come here.”

Heckenlively is one of the loudest voices in the anti-vaxxer movement, which regards childhood vaccines suspiciously and believes they might be linked to autism. Some members of movement argue that children should not be vaccinated for potentially devastating, but preventable, diseases like measles and polio.

 

 

Read more: Everything You Need to Know About the Anti-Vaxxer Movement

Global Citizen campaigns to ensure vaccines are affordable and accessible to all because 1.5 million children die before their fifth birthdays every year from preventable diseases, according to UNICEF.

In 2015, 15 children died from measles every hour, according to the World Health Organization. Those deaths could have been prevented by the vaccine against which Heckenlively advocates.

When children go unvaccinated, they are not only vulnerable to contracting diseases like polio, but increase the exposure of other children to these diseases, increasing the likelihood that other unvaccinated children will fall ill. When almost all of the population is vaccinated, the population is believed to have “herd immunity.”

Read More: 5 Vaccine Myths That Are Completely Not True

Australia has strict laws around child vaccinations and they are serious about making sure every child is vaccinated against preventable deadly diseases.

“If we don’t get herd immunity within kids across society, we will see children dying,” Dutton has said.

In January, the government implemented a “no jab, no play” policy that requires children to be vaccinated in order to attend kindergarten and daycare.

Read more: In Australia, Kids Will Have to Be Vaccinated to Start Kindergarten

"These people who are telling kids, telling parents that their kids shouldn't be vaccinated are dangerous people," Dutton told 2GB.

Last month, the Australian government also banned two other anti-vaccination campaigners from entering the country for a period of three years, the BBC reported.

Read more: John Oliver Takes on 'Anti-Vaxxers' Over Vaccine Myths

Australia recently launched a $4.3 million (AUD$5.5 million) campaign to combat the anti-vaccination movement in Australia, according to ABC News Australia. The campaign aims to provide parents with easy access to evidence-based information that supports the safety of and need for vaccinations for children.

 

 

The country has also committed to making vaccinations affordable and accessible to children in developing countries. Australia committed more than $240 million to support immunization in developing countries through GAVI, the the vaccine alliance.

You can take action to ensure affordable life-saving vaccines are made a priority in reaching every child here.

Daniele is an Editorial Coordinator at Global Citizen. She believes that education and the equal provision of human rights will empower change. She studied music and psychology at Vassar before earning her Masters of International Affairs at Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs. Daniele brings with her an unhealthy love of chili and chocolate, and a small, fluffy dog from the Little Red Dot (Singapore) to the Big Apple.

  •  
  •  
  •  
Sign up to receive alerts about the world's biggest challenges.
 
Sign up

What's Trending In Health

Aug. 31, 2017

You don’t want to know how this infection spreads. Read More

April 19, 2016

A doctor in Gaza is experimenting with bee stings to treat a wide range of ailments. Read More

Aug. 22, 2017

Every mother deserves a healthy, full term pregnancy, and every newborn has the right to thrive. Read More

 
 
JOIN THE CONVERSATION
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

© 2012-2017 Global Poverty Project, Inc All Rights Reserved

 
This site uses cookies to provide you with the best experience. Read more.
×
×
Global Citizen
Global Citizen
FREE - In Google Play
VIEW

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.