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  2. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    Happy National Tea Day! 🙌#NationalTeaDay brings up a vital question! 🚨What is the secret to a perfect brew? 😉 Let us know.Find out more about #MencapTeaParty: https://bit.ly/2oT2Om3
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  4. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    By Joe McCarthy and Erica Sanchez NOV. 20, 2018 14 WATER & SANITATION World's Water Could Become Scarce if the Amazon Rainforest Is Destroyed The world is already facing a severe water crisis. Why Global Citizens Should Care Access to water is a fundamental human right that’s being threatened by climate change and environmental degradation. The United Nations’ calls on countries to make clean water access universal. You can join us in taking action on this issue here. The Amazon rainforest is home to 10% of the world’s species, generates 20% of global oxygen, and creates half of its own rain through an intricate water cycle dynamic. It’s a natural system that’s a world unto itself — and it faces potentially catastrophic levels of deforestation under the new administration of Brazil’s president-elect Jair Bolsonaro, who has vowed to allow industrial interests to have more access to the forest. If that happens, the effects would be felt far beyond Brazil. In particular, countries around the world could face droughts and water shortages, according to National Geographic. Take Action: Urge Governments And Businesses To Invest In Clean Water And Toilets That’s because the Amazon influences global rain patterns and is itself a major source of water. The push and pull of the water cycle throughout the 2.125 million square mile forest creates a “giant flowing river in the sky,” Nat Geo reports, which eventually feeds rivers and lakes around the world. The Amazon is also a major carbon sink and its ongoing absorption of greenhouse gas emissions helps to mitigate global warming and climate change. As temperatures rise, precipitation patterns get skewed — some countries receive more rainfall, while other get less. This is already playing out in the world as many countries face increasingly dry conditions, which undermines agricultural systems and leads to water shortages. These effects are expected to be felt as far as away as Africa and North America, Nat Geo reports. Read More: Brazil Federal Court Blocks President’s Effort to Open Amazon to Gold Mining If the Amazon continues to decline, it could enter a dangerous feedback loop, where chainsawed trees release greenhouse gas emissions causing temperatures to rise and the forest to dry, weakening the water cycle, and causing further drying. Earlier in the year, a study showed that the Amazon is very close to reaching this point and could even resemble a desert within the next few decades. The world is already facing a severe water crisis. More than 30% of the global population is unable to access clean drinking water and the UN estimates that more than 5 billion people could be affected by water shortages by 2050. Read More: 10 Pictures of How People Get Water Around the World A large part of this problem is due to mismanaged natural resources. In Latin America, Africa, and Asia, for example, most rivers are compromised by pollution from industrial runoff, the UN reports. Further, 80% of global wastewater and sewage is discharged directly into bodies of water, rendering it unsafe. Around two-thirds of forests and wetlands, which are essential to cleaning and maintaining water supplies, have been lost or degraded. The continual damming of rivers throughout the world, which is common in Brazil, also disrupts water systems. Read More: Pope Francis Says Selling Water Is 'Incompatible' With Human Rights In various countries, water has become scarce. For example, Lake Chad has shrunk by 95% in recent decades, putting millions of people at risk of famine. In Shanghai, 85% of the city’s drinking rivers are too polluted to draw water from. Melting glaciers throughout Asia, meanwhile, could deprive millions of people of drinking water. Earlier this year, Cape Town narrowly averted becoming the first major city in the world to run out of water. Read More: Photos of Cape Town in Crisis as the City's Water Runs Out Emerging water insecurity could eventually lead to conflicts. Some analysts argue that the civil war in Syria was partially fueled by a devastating drought linked to climate change. The good news is that these consequences are not inevitable. If forests like the Amazon are protected rather then cut down, rivers are cleaned rather than polluted, and greenhouse gas emissions are curbed rather than released, then water sources could remain robust well into the future. TOPICSCurrent eventsWASHClimate changeDroughtWaterWater and sanitationForestAmazon rainforestWater shortagesagua potableRainforestRain patternsrecursos de la selva amazonicabosques y agua potableagua en el mundoselva amazonica
  5. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    Here's What Pregnancy Looks Like Around Sub-Saharan Africa Authors: Jackie Marchildon and Olivia Kestin Paolo Patruno Health Nov. 20, 2018 40 Why Global Citizens Should Care Every day, hundreds of women and girls die from preventable causes related to pregnancy and childbirth. But there’s a movement of countries, companies, and charities attempting to fight for their lives. Take action here to protect vulnerable women and children around the world. An estimated 130 million babies are born every year around the world. That’s about 356,000 per day. Sadly, with all that new life comes a vast number of maternal deaths. About 830 women die from pregnancy- or childbirth-related complications every day — 99% of these deaths occur in developing countries, with more than half of them in sub-Saharan Africa, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). Paolo Patruno, 46, is a social documentary photographer based in Bologna, Italy. In 2011, he started a long-term project called “Birth is a Dream,” a photo series that seeks to shed light on maternal health in sub-Saharan Africa. Take Action: The UK Pledged to Help Save 35 Million Lives! Let’s Celebrate — and Ask the Government to Keep It Up Patruno was working as a project manager for an NGO in Malawi when he met Rachel MacLeod, a senior clinical midwife who worked in the labor ward of the Bwaila Hospital, in Lilongwe, Malawi’s capital city. MacLeod introduced him to the issue of maternal health in Africa, and his series came to life. Patruno didn’t just want to snap a few photos — he became invested in raising awareness on what he considers to be an underreported topic. “The main issues that are behind this matter are the same [no matter where you are in Africa],” Patruno told Global Citizen. A midwife listens to a fetal heartbeat using a pinard horn while visiting a pregnant woman in Chankhungu health center. Chankhungu, Malawi Image: Paolo Patruno He said that circumstances — like rural versus city living — can play large roles in maternal care, but that when it came to maternal health issues, they remained the same across the African countries he visited. “What I realized is that this is really a social issue, rather than a health issue,” he said. The maternal mortality rate in developing countries was 239 per 100,000 live births in 2015, compared to just 12 in developed countries, according to the WHO’s most recent data. Africa has the world’s highest rate of adolescent pregnancy. Many girls in small villages drop out of school early, having had sexual relationships with young boys, and getting pregnant before the age of 18. Bakumba, Cameroon Image: Paolo Patruno Poverty, distance to health centres, lack of education, lack of services, and cultural practices all play roles in these statistics. “I think that the main root of this problem is not just the lack of doctors, the lack of hospitals or health centres,” Patruno said. “It’s mainly something that is coming from a cultural approach, tradition.” He gave the example of women being unable to leave their homes for a long period time. In rural areas, women need to be away from their homes for a few weeks if they choose to give birth in a health centre — it takes a number of days for them to reach health centres in the first place, and then they need to deliver and recover before heading back. A mother holds her new baby after a gruelling childbirth and several hours of labor. Bukavu, DRC Image: Paolo Patruno For many women, this is just not possible as they are the primary caregivers at home and many also tend to their family’s agricultural needs. He also explained that some men don’t want their partners to deliver with male health workers, which poses a big problem as many doctors are men. Many women therefore avoid visiting health centres to deliver their babies, which increases the chances of maternal or infant mortality. Women giving birth in rural villages are most at risk. Since women have to take care of home duties and other children, they sometimes decide to have home deliveries, rather than going to hospitals or health centers. Chibabel, Mozambique Image: Paolo Patruno In other cases, women do visit health centres but they have negative experiences, and so they choose not to return for their next pregnancies. Given that women in developing countries have more children on average, their lifetime risk of death due to pregnancy is much higher, and so a decision not to return to a health facility for future pregnancies could have dire results. In Uganda, for example, Patruno said he followed a traditional birth attendant (TBA) and one of her patients was a midwife who opted to have a home birth instead of giving birth in the hospital where she worked. Pregnant women have to work, taking care of house and family duties almost until the day of delivery — providing water and carrying heavy cans. Kampala, Uganda Image: Paolo Patruno It’s difficult to improve maternal health issues, according to Patruno. He said many organizations try to tackle this from the wrong angle, relying too much on a medical or health-based approach when it’s much more complex than that. The Global Financing Facility (GFF) essentially aims to avoid doing just that. By working with governments and on-the-ground initiatives, the GFF helps prioritize interventions across the full health spectrum, but by addressing areas like nutrition, education, social protection, and gender, rather than just looking for the most obvious answer. “The education approach is mainly the best way, because if you can educate a girl, maybe you are able to educate a woman after — and even a family,” the photographer said. “It’s much more easier to say, ‘OK, we provided an ambulance, we provided ... an incubator, we built a new unit, we provided beds — rather than to approach the problem … To educate … To go to the local community …” Midwife Mestwote takes the blood blood pressure of a pregnant woman through an outreach program in a rural area. Jinka, Ethiopia Image: Paolo Patruno Patruno has seen firsthand the limits of financial or technical support. In one health centre in Ethiopia, the workers couldn’t use the modern ambulances they had been provided because they had broken down and the staff didn’t have the means to fix them. In another, health workers relied on bulb lamps instead of incubators because they were broken, too. “I wanted to use my photography as a tool,” he said. “I wanted to focus on this project to let people know … this is a problem. Women are dying.” Patruno referenced maternal mortality rates — more than 300,000 women die every year in Africa due to childbirth and pregnancy-related issues. “That is much more than a war, that is much more than [terrorism] … but people don’t know and so that’s why I was very interested to focus on this matter,” he said. “The problem is not solved.”
  6. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    Por Joe McCarthy y Erica Sanchez 17 DE ABRIL DE 2019 33 MEDIO AMBIENTE El 'efecto Attenborough' está causando que la contaminación plástica se reduzca Las celebridades tienen un papel único en la reducción de residuos plásticos. Por qué es importante para los Global Citizens El plástico contamina los ecosistemas marinos en todo el mundo, causando daño a varias especies. Los Objetivos Mundiales de las Naciones Unidas piden a los países que protejan el medio ambiente. Puedes unirte a nosotros para tomar medidas sobre este tema aquí. En el último episodio de la serie Blue Planet II de Sir David Attenborough, el icónico ecologista ha dirigido su atención al creciente problema de los residuos plásticos. El episodio mostró que los pajaros ya se alimentan de trozos de plástico, las costas están cubiertas de contaminación y los ambientes marinos de todo el mundo llenos de desechos plásticos. A lo largo de la serie, Attenborough instó a los espectadores a ser más sostenibles, y sus esfuerzos parecen haber dado sus frutos. Un nuevo informe de GlobalWebIndex muestra que las personas en los Estados Unidos y el Reino Unido redujeron su uso de plástico de un solo uso en un 53% en los últimos 12 meses. Los autores atribuyen la pronunciada disminución al "efecto Attenborough". Actúa: Firma ahora 1 punto United StatesUnited KingdomGermanyCanadaAustraliaAfghanistanÅland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBruneiBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCabo VerdeCambodiaCameroonCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo (the Democratic Republic of the)Cook IslandsCosta RicaCôte d'IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands [Malvinas]Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambia (The)GeorgiaGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuamGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and McDonald IslandsHoly See [Vatican City State]HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIranIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKuwaitKyrgyzstanLaosLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedoniaMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMicronesia (the Federated States of)MoldoviaMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorth KoreaNorthern Mariana IslandsNorwayOmanPakistanPalauPalestine, State ofPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarRéunionRomaniaRussiaRwandaSaint BarthélemySaint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth KoreaSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyriaTaiwanTajikistanTanzaniaThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited States Minor Outlying IslandsUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuelaVietnamVirgin Islands (British)Virgin Islands (U.S.)Wallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabwe "Esta es un área donde el poder de las celebridades realmente se puede utilizar para el bien", dijo a Global Citizen, Bill Levey, CEO de Naeco, una compañía que fabrica alternativas plásticas sostenibles. “En el caso de Attenborough, ha estado informando sobre temas científicos durante décadas, se ganó el respeto de los científicos y, a esta edad, ahora tiene un tipo de aura paterna y majestuosa”. "Realmente creo que este es un problema que solo puede beneficiarse de tener una voz fuerte y potente", agregó. GlobalWebIndex encuestó a 3.833 personas en los Estados Unidos y el Reino Unido y encontró que el 82% prefiere los envases sostenibles para los productos que compran en la vida cotidiana y el 66% es más probable que confíe en marcas que se comprometen a ser más sostenibles. La gente también se ha inspirado en la tendencia de Attenborough a seguir su propio consejo. Durante el rodaje de Blue Planet II, su equipo recogió cada parte de la basura que encontraron en el océano. En el último año, la lucha contra la contaminación plástica ha cobrado impulso en todo el mundo. Más de 60 países han tomado medidas para restringir la producción y el consumo de plástico, las grandes empresas multinacionales han invertido en alternativas y los ciudadanos han encabezado la limpieza de los océanos. Pero las celebridades podrían ser clave para hacer que el movimiento se generalice, según explicó Levey. "Cualquier persona con muchos seguidores puede usar su plataforma para ayudar a crear conciencia sobre los efectos de nuestro uso del plástico en el medio ambiente", dijo Levey. "En el mundo de hoy, hay muchas celebridades que tienen seguidores muy específicos y tienen la capacidad de llegar a personas que de otra manera no podrían escuchar sobre estos temas", agregó. Varias celebridades se han convertido en defensores de la causa en los últimos años. La actriz Emma Watson usó un vestido hecho de botellas plásticas recicladas para el Met Gala 2016, la cantante de R&B SZA creó una línea de ropa que recicla residuos de plástico en los océanos, y el actor Adrien Brody se ha convertido en uno de los principales defensores de la lucha contra el uso de sorbetes de plástico. Durante más de una década, Attenborough ha mostrado el esplendor de la Tierra y ha advertido sobre su posible declive. No es de extrañar que cuando le dio a la gente algo tangible que pudieran hacer para ayudar al planeta, reducir el plástico, lo aceptaron. Y ahora el movimiento que ayudó a crecer está impulsando un cambio fundamental a nivel legislativo. El gobierno del Reino Unido actualmente está consultando con expertos en plástico para desarrollar políticas para mejorar las tasas de reciclaje y reducir la producción de plástico, según Geoff Brighty, el director técnico de Plastic Oceans. "Realmente ha cristalizado en la mente del gobierno que la conciencia pública se ha movido a un lugar donde ya no queremos que esto suceda, está afectando nuestras vidas, no queremos que afecte a nuestros ecosistemas", dijo Brighty. TEMASCurrent eventsPlastic pollutionPlasticOceansPlastic wasteMarine environmentscontaminacion plasticaSir David Attenboroughoceanosalternativas al plasticoreduccion de residuos plasticos COMENTARIOS
  7. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    Dear world leaders, protect the environment!
  8. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    #HappyEaster to all the peeps celebrating!
  9. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    By James Hitchings-Hales and Carmen Singer NOV. 20, 2018 42 ADVOCACYGIRLS & WOMEN This 14-Year-Old Went Straight to the Police When Her Parents Tried to Force Her to Marry Here’s how girls like Mestawet Mekuria are empowered to control their own lives. Why Global Citizens Should Care The UN’s Global Goals call for an end to all gender violence — including the elimination of forced marriage. Nevertheless, 12 million girls around the world are married before the age of 18. You can join us by taking action here to achieve the Global Goals. Mestawet Mekuria dreams of becoming a teacher or doctor when she grows up. But as a 14-year-old girl in Ethiopia, she found her future under threat from the very people who were supposed to help her realise her ambitions. Her parents attempted to force her to marry. But she wasn’t having any of it. Take Action: Sign This Petition to #LeveltheLaw and Empower Girls and Women Around the World “I went to the police station when my parents told me that I am getting married,” Mekuria told UNICEF Ethiopia. “I had learned about child marriage and its consequences in our school’s girls’ club,” she said. “I told my parents that I do not want to get married. But they refused, and that is when I ran to the police station.” It came as a surprise to Mekuria when her parents were arrested and imprisoned for a fortnight. The minimum marriage age in Ethiopia is 18 — but laws are rarely enforced, and she thought her mum and dad might just get a warning. Indeed, Mekuria lives in the Amhara region, where 56% of girls are married before the age of 18, according to the 2011 Ethiopian Demographic Health Survey (EDHS). It took the intervention of village elders to eventually make peace between Mekuria and her parents, but now everything has returned to normal — way better than normal, actually. “My parents now understand about child marriage and its consequences,” Mekuria said. “They are no longer angry with me.” Mekuria is one of 20 girls rescued from child marriage in the last two years at Ayti Primary School in northern Ethiopia — and if you’re from Britain, you helped make it happen. The girls’ club that taught Mekuria about the issue was supported by UK aid — the lifesaving money spent by the Department of International Development (DfID) to end extreme poverty before 2030. Now, partly thanks to UK aid, Mekuria is free to focus on her aspirations for medicine or teaching. Read More: Married at 3, Divorced at 7 — Two Ethiopian Girls Share Their Story Specifically, UK aid money was used to support the UNICEF-UNFPA Global Programme to Accelerate Action to End Child Marriage, which in turn worked with the Bureau of Women and Children Affairs (BoWCA) to set up clubs like these all over the Amhara region in 2015, according to UNICEF Ethiopia. The clubs empower young girls by offering life skills training, information about their rights, and even reaching out to families to change attitudes often rooted in traditional beliefs and values. And it works: a BoWCA trainer told UNICEF Ethiopia that it helped 106 girls escape child marriage in 2016 and 55 in 2017. Globally, over 650 million women alive today were married as children. See UNICEF USA's other Tweets Twitter Ads info and privacy In July 2014, the UK hosted the world’s first Girl Summit with the intention of ending forced marriage and female genital mutilation (FGM) within a generation. It was there that Ethiopia pledged to end both by 2025. But it’s an uphill struggle. The EDHS reports that 65% of women aged 14-49 in Ethiopia have undergone FGM, while two in five girls will be married before their 18th birthday. It’s difficult to prosecute child marriage too: Ethiopia has no working system to register births, deaths, or marriages, according to Girls Not Brides, so it’s incredibly difficult to prove that a girl is actually underage. Read More: This Incredible Former Child Bride Persuaded Her Country to Ban Child Marriage Child marriage has painful consequences for society as a whole. It’s not just girls like Mekuria who suffer — it can contribute to trap entire communities in poverty indefinitely as it limits economic progress. When girls marry young, they’re more likely to drop out of school; more vulnerable to gender violence; less likely to get a job; at greater risk of poor health, FGM, and pregnancy complications. “Child marriage is a harmful practice, and I want girls to continue with their education like me,” Mekuria said. “I have seen my classmates quit school because they are married. I always tell my friends in my village about child marriage, and I will continue to do so to others”. View image on Twitter 19 people are talking about this Twitter Ads info and privacy TOPICSGender EqualityChild MarriageDfIDUK AidEthiopiaUNICEFWomen and GirlsForced MarriageUNFPA
  10. spongebob

    REDZONE TERRIBLE EXPERIENCE

    😂 Think ive done enough moaning for now. 😝
  11. CorkVegan

    If I read the Bible today..

    "Then God said, "I give you every seed-bearing plant on the face of the whole earth and every tree that has fruit with seed in it. They will be yours for food." Genesis 1:29
  12. Manohlive

    u2 song of the day

    My Easter Sunday U2 song of the day. This is one song to me even though it's two. Happy Easter, Everyone. 🐇
  13. CorkVegan

    REDZONE TERRIBLE EXPERIENCE

    We're just waiting for you to start a thread @spongebob so we can all pile on. 😜
  14. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    0 AID AND DEVELOPMENT What is fragility and why does it matter in the fight against extreme poverty? April 10 2019 | By: EMILY HUIE JOIN Join the fight against extreme poverty EmailJoin Share on Facebook Save on Facebook Share on Twitter Share by Email If you’ve watched the news lately, you might have heard the term “fragile state.” When a crisis hits a fragile state, the effects can be devastating, and often contribute to the cycle of extreme poverty. In order to end extreme poverty [by 2030], the world must do better about reaching the extreme poor who live in fragile states. This is a big challenge, but not an insurmountable one. There are currently more than 735 million people living in extreme poverty. Almost two-thirds (over 514 million) of these people are concentrated in fragile and conflict-affected states, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. In fact, 35 of the world’s current fragile states are in sub-Saharan Africa. Experts predict that by 2030, more than 80% of people living in extreme poverty will be in fragile states. So what exactly is fragility and how can it affect countries? A country or region is generally classified as fragile when it is vulnerable to shocks – violent conflict, natural disasters or economic crises – and lacks the capacity to cope with them. Citizens of a fragile state have to deal with a lot of instability, and they are exposed to higher risks when the unexpected happens. Countries can be fragile for a number of different reasons. Some governments do not have the capacity to create a resilient environments . In some cases they lack the resources, in others corrupt leaders are more concerned with consolidating power and wealth for themselves than using state resources to provide basic services. Other factors such as natural disasters, regional instability, ethnic conflicts or violence can also make a country fragile. Regardless of what causes fragility, when things go wrong, the citizens are hardest hit. If you keep up with current events, you’re probably familiar with the Ebola crisis in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). In the DRC, decades of exploitation and ethnic rivalries have led to protracted and violent conflicts over political power and natural resources. Although the civil war officially ended in 2003, violence is still widespread, particularly in the eastern part of the country. These conflicts have been at the expense of citizens’ basic needs. When an Ebola outbreak began last August in the DRC, medical professionals, aid workers, and government officials were unable to reach communities because of poor infrastructure, weak health systems, and conflict. To make things worse, while medical workers struggled to reach those affected, communities struggled to trust those workers because often their experiences lead them to distrust the government and other officials. The result is an ongoing health crisis that has led to over 900 infections, and over 560 deaths. People living in fragile states, like the DRC, face even more difficulty escaping extreme poverty. Displacement, increased likelihood of disease, and food scarcity are just some of the things that can come about from a crisis. That’s why working to end fragility will have immense effects on combating extreme poverty, and prevent bad situations from becoming catastrophic.
  15. Malahide

    Have to Count - the new and improved one :P

    44902 Overload of sun here
  16. CorkVegan

    u2 song of the day

  17. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    🙌🏽🙌🏽🙌🏽
  18. paoladegliesposti

    If I read the Bible today..

    Acts 13:38,39,40. Therefore, brothers and sisters,know this: through Jesus we proclaim forgiveness of sins to you. From all those sins from which you couldn't be put in right relationship with God through Moses' law, through Jesus everyone who believes is put in right relationship with God. Take care that the prophets' words don't apply to you.
  19. paoladegliesposti

    u2 song of the day

  20. dmway

    What concert are you seeing next?

    I'm glad you liked it! I knew you wouldn't be disappointed. If I didn't have another show tonight (which I just came back from), I seriously would have considered going. I love Montclair, NJ and would like a reason to go back sometime. Fix You were very good too - they also opened at the show I saw last week. Yes, the singer had Chris Martin's quasi-hyperactivity down very well (and he sang well too). UF are always worth the effort to see. The band members are starting to recognize me at the shows because I'm at them so often. (I guess wearing The Fly shades helps too...
  21. CorkVegan

    What concert are you seeing next?

    Unforgettable Fire were great. Their Bono could pass as the real one. He has the look and mannerisms down to perfection. They played a great set and the place was rocking. Fix You played first and are a Coldplay tribute. I'm not up to date with Coldplay but I recognized about 80% of the FY set. Their lead singer has amazing energy and was constantly moving throughout the performance. A fantastic night out. I would go again in a heartbeat. Now bed.
  22. mich40

    What concert are you seeing next?

    The Church playing Starfish in its entirety. Brings back so many memories. It was fabulous. Then they did a second set of other songs.
  23. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    GIRLS & WOMEN A Thong Was Presented in a Rape Trial. Women in Ireland (and Around the World) Are Furious. “You have to look at the way she was dressed. She was wearing a thong with a lace front.” Why Global Citizens Should Care Gender equality and an end to gender-based violence are key aims of the UN’s Global Goals. And in 2018, we surely must be done with placing blame for sexual harassment and rape on the victim, rather than the perpetrator. Join us by taking action here to raise your voice to help create a world where #SheIsEqual. Hundreds of people have taken to the streets of Cork and Dublin in protest of victim-blaming, after a court case in which a rape complainant’s thong was held up as evidence sparked outrage. Activists and campaigners are demanding judicial reform over sexual assault cases, as well as better training for barristers — to put an end to a culture that puts the blame for sexual assault on survivors, rather than perpetrators. The case, at the Central Criminal Court earlier this month, saw a lawyer representing the accused hold up the underwear worn by the teenage complainant — telling jurors they should consider the underwear when making their verdict. Take Action: Tell the UK Government: Help Create a World Where #SheIsEqual “Does the evidence out rule the possibility that she was attracted to the defendant and was open to meeting someone and being with someone?” the lawyer asked jurors in the closing argument. “You have to look at the way she was dressed. She was wearing a thong with a lace front.” View image on Twitter 23 people are talking about this Twitter Ads info and privacy While the man was found not guilty, the case sparked concern from activists, campaign groups, and members of the public in Ireland and around the world. As well as protests on the street, Teachta Dála Ruth Coppinger, the Solidarity TD, also held up a thong in the Dáil chamber on Tuesday to speak out on the issue. She said that women’s clothes, fake tan, and even contraception had been used as evidence during trials, according to the Times. “A study by the Rape Crisis Network estimated that, at most, 10% of rapes are reported and only one in 40 rapists appropriately punished,” she said. “How heroic and what levels of fortitude must a woman have to pursue a rape trial in this country?” 455 people are talking about this Twitter Ads info and privacy See Claire's other Tweets Twitter Ads info and privacy View image on Twitter 245 people are talking about this Twitter Ads info and privacy “It might seem incongruous or embarrassing to show a thong in the Dáil, but I do so to highlight how a rape victim feels at her underwear being shown in the incongruous setting of a courtroom,” she said. And women around the world are joining together in solidarity with Irish protesters too, posting images of their underwear with #ThisIsNotConsent. Related StoriesNov. 1, 2018Women Just Silently Stood in Protest During President’s Speech at South Africa’s First Gender Violence Summit Taoiseach (Irish prime minister) Leo Varadkar has said in response that the government must examine how alleged rape victims are treated in court. Varadkar reportedly responded to Coppinger by saying: “Let there be no doubt that nobody asks to be raped and it is never the fault of the victim. It doesn’t matter what someone wears, where someone went, who they went with, or whether they took drugs or alcohol.” “Nobody who is a victim of sexual violence or rape is ever to blame for the crime committed on them,” he said. “I believe any defence on those lines is reprehensible.” View image on Twitter 2,505 people are talking about this Twitter Ads info and privacy Legal expert and academic Tom O’Malley is carrying out a review of changes that can be made to help protect those who make complaints of sexual assault. “This is just one example of what is every day in cases of sexual violence where your clothes, your manner, which has nothing to do with sexual violence can be used as evidence against you, can be used as evidence of consent,” said Cork Solidarity councillor Fiona Ryan. “I was inundated over the weekend with people outraged and with people wanting to show their anger,” she said. The rallies were organised by Reproductive Rights Against Oppression, Sexism, and Austerity (ROSA). Related StoriesNov. 1, 2018Girls Are More Likely to Die in Countries Where Gender Inequality Persists “Obviously in the courts, the idea that a person’s underwear being used by a defence barrister as some indication of their intentions is absolutely despicable,” said Rita Harrold, from ROSA. “This culture that tells us we have to keep ourselves safe, we have to wear conservative clothes, we can’t go to certain places, is a culture that tolerates rape and blames victims and we won’t take it anymore,” she said. Meanwhile, Noeline Blackwell, head of the Dublin Rape Crisis Centre, said it supported “rape stereotypes” in trials. “The reference to the girl’s underwear and the assumption and inference that the jury was being invited to draw — that because she was dressed like that she was asking for sex — does not surprise us,” she said. TOPICSGender EqualityUKBritainIrelandSexual HarassmentGender-Based ViolenceRapeVictim BlamingDublinCorkLeo Varadkar
  24. Yesterday
  25. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    ENVIRONMENT This Plastic-Eating Fungus Just Might Save Humanity One man’s Aspergillus tubingensis is another man’s treasure. Flickr/Alan Levine There's a common saying that, "One many's trash is another man's treasure." For one group of scientists, this old adage may actually have some truth to it. According to the World Economic Forum, a team of botanists may have discovered a solution to the world’s mounting plastic problem in an unexpected place: a garbage dump in Islamabad, Pakistan. The team of researchers, who work at the Chinese Academy of Sciences’ Kunming Institute of Botany, discovered a plastic-eating fungus called Aspergillus tubingensis while collecting soil samples at the Pakistan landfill. “We wanted to identify solutions which already existed in nature, but finding microorganisms which can do the job isn’t easy,” Dr. Sehroon Khan of the World Agroforestry Centre and Kunming Institute of Biology said. “We decided to take samples from a rubbish dump in Islamabad, Pakistan, to see if anything was feeding on the plastic in the same way that other organisms feed on dead plant or animal matter.” The fungus they discovered works to naturally biodegrade a certain type of plastic called polyester polyurethane — which is found in synthetic leather, adhesives, and car parts, according to Fast Company — by secreting an enzyme that breaks down molecular bonds. According to DAWN, the process takes just a matter of weeks, whereas plastics normally take up to 1,000 years to biodegrade in landfills on their own. Even biodegradable plastics, such as polylactic acid (PLA), which is a type of plastic made from corn, take between 47 and 90 days to decompose. Embed from Getty Images Read More: Scientists Discover Plastic-Eating Caterpillars That Could Help Fight Waste The issue of plastic waste is fast becoming one of the greatest threats to natural ecosystems on land and in the ocean. Plastic waste is polluting the world’s oceans at a rate of 8 million metric tons per year, throttling seals, turtles, and other sea creatures, and even seeping into drinking water. By 2050, it’s estimated that the ocean will have more plastic than fish. What doesn’t land in the oceans more often than not ends up clogging city streets, polluting natural environments, and wasting away in landfills around the world. Around the world, 79% of all plastic is either littered into the natural environment or collected in landfills, according to National Geographic. Read More: 83% of All Tap Water Around the World Has Plastic Fibers In It By 2050, 12 billion metric tons of plastic will have accumulated in landfills around the world, National Geographic reported. Embed from Getty Images Harmful chemicals from plastics buried in landfills can also seep into groundwater supplies, leading to adverse health consequences for humans and animals alike. Researchers at Kunming Institute plan to study whether the plastic-eating fungus will be able to be used in waste treatment plants and plastic-waste-contaminated soils. Global Citizen campaigns on the Global Goals for Sustainable Development, the 15th of which is protecting life on land. You can take action here. TOPICSClimate changeSustainabilityPakistanOcean PlasticFungus COMMENTS
  26. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    HEALTH India Just Opened Its First Elephant Hospital — and the Pictures Are Amazing India is home to half of Asia’s elephant population. Why Global Citizens Should Care Biodiversity is dwindling all around the world and elephants in particular face a range of threats. The United Nations Global Goals calls on countries to protect the environment and animals and you can join us in taking action on this issue here. Elephants that are battered, bruised, and otherwise injured can now get the medical help they need in Uttar Pradesh, India, according to Reuters. A 12,000-square-foot elephant hospital opened in the city of Mathura on Nov. 16 that caters primarily to elderly elephants and those that have experienced trauma in captivity. For example, many captive elephants are often shackled, whipped, and beaten. Other elephants that sustain injuries in the wild are also welcomed at the hospital. Elephant doctors will have access to “wireless digital X-Ray, thermal imaging, ultrasonography, tranquilization devices, and quarantine facilities,” and they’ll be able to visit elephants remotely that aren’t able to travel to the hospital, according to Reuters. Take Action: Ensure All Communities Can Withstand Climate Disaster View image on Twitter 16 people are talking about this Twitter Ads info and privacy Animal rights groups are applauding the facility, called the Wildlife SOS Hospital, as a sign of conservation done right. “I think by building a hospital we are underlining the fact that elephants need welfare measures as much as any other animal,” Geeta Seshamani, co-founder of Wildlife SOS, the nonprofit behind the hospital, told Reuters. 18 people are talking about this Twitter Ads info and privacy “That captive elephants are not meant to be used and abused but instead have to be given the respect which an animal needs if you are going to be using the animal,” she added. India is home to half of Asia’s elephant population, yet their numbers have been dropping in recent years, and Indian elephants are considered endangered. See EcoInternet's other Tweets Read More: Mozambique Gets Gift of 200 Elephants to Help Replenish Population Indian elephants roam for around 19 hours a day and eat so much food that they can produce up to 220 pounds of waste each day. These biological imperatives mean that the animals need large amounts of land and food to survive. As human development proliferates in the country, elephant habitats are dwindling, depriving the animals of sustenance. As humans move into elephant ranges, meanwhile, the big creatures more frequently wander into towns and cities, where they get frightened and stampede over houses and people. Deprived of food sources, elephants also devour crops throughout farmlands, earning the ire of the agricultural industry. These byproducts of sprawling and often unregulated human development have led to elephants being poisoned and hunted to minimize interactions. Elephants are also under the constant threat of poaching to fuel the black market demand for ivory. Because only male Indian elephants have tusks, poaching skews the sex ratio of the species, imperiling future generations. Read More: Humans Could Face Extinction if We Don't Protect Biodiversity: UN While the elephant hospital in Mathura doesn’t guarantee the species’ long-term survival, it does signal to the country that elephants are worth protecting. It has also become a tourist attraction, according to Reuters, which could help spur broader conservation efforts. 369 people are talking about this Twitter Ads info and privacy In addition to the treatment center, dedicated wildlife reserves big enough to accommodate the animal’s tendencies can help to conserve the species and India currently has 32 elephant reserves. For example, the North Bank Landscape along the foothills of the Himalayas provides 1,600 square miles of protected habitat for elephants to live. TOPICSCurrent eventsHealthIndiaHospitalElephantElephant hospitalHealth Care
  27. CorkVegan

    What concert are you seeing next?

    Sitting here with a belly full of Jamaican food. The preshow music is Jane's Addiction, Pavement and "Dig for Fire," by the Pixies right now. Let's do this!
  28. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    By Leah Rodriguez NOV. 16, 2018 16 CITIZENSHIP This Artist Wants to Humanize the Refugee Experience Through Comics “People talk about numbers and movements in ways that can be really depersonalizing.” Why Global Citizens Should Care Millions of people around the world are trying to rebuild their lives after being affected by crisis and conflict. Comic artist Ali Fitzgerald's new graphic memoir “Drawn to Berlin: Comic Workshops in Refugee Shelters and Other Stories from a New Europe” tells the stories of asylum seekers assimilating to life in Berlin. You can join us in taking action on this issue here. American artist Ali Fitzgerald didn’t have any experience working with refugees when she started teaching a comic workshop at a Berlin shelter during the height of Europe’s migrant crisis in 2015. Now, after drawing with children and adults who were waiting on the results of asylum status applications over the course of a year and a half, she’s sharing her experience in a new graphic memoir. Released in October, Drawn to Berlin: Comic Workshops in Refugee Shelters and Other Stories from a New Europenavigates what life looks like after being forced to leave home through the eyes of Fitzgerald's students, Saker and Michael*. A portion of her income from the book — 10% — will go toward funding art programs for refugees and asylum seekers. Take Action: Call for Education Access for Syrian Refugees Actúa: Tuitea ahora United StatesUnited KingdomGermanyCanadaAustraliaAfghanistanÅland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBruneiBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCabo VerdeCambodiaCameroonCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo (the Democratic Republic of the)Cook IslandsCosta RicaCôte d'IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands [Malvinas]Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambia (The)GeorgiaGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuamGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and McDonald IslandsHoly See [Vatican City State]HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIranIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKuwaitKyrgyzstanLaosLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedoniaMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMicronesia (the Federated States of)MoldoviaMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorth KoreaNorthern Mariana IslandsNorwayOmanPakistanPalauPalestine, State ofPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarRéunionRomaniaRussiaRwandaSaint BarthélemySaint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth KoreaSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyriaTaiwanTajikistanTanzaniaThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited States Minor Outlying IslandsUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuelaVietnamVirgin Islands (British)Virgin Islands (U.S.)Wallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabwe En asociación con: HP Inc. When Fitzgerald started teaching at the refugee shelter in 2015, 1.1 million refugees crossed the German border, according to the Brookings Institute. As of 2017, Berlin’s department for social affairs reported over 25,700 refugees live in the city. Of the 150 refugees Fitzgerald met while working in the shelter, many of those who fled conflict in Syria and Afghanistan are now trying to assimilate to German life as far-right nationalism is on the rise. In her memoir, Fitzgerald aims to humanize her students’ stories by focusing on the opportunities they have ahead of them, rather than harping on the terrors of their pasts. To do this, she sometimes protrays real-life events through a magical, fictional lens. The artist, whose work has appeared in the New Yorker, the Guardian, and more, spoke with Global Citizen about refugee storytelling, the current anti-refugee sentiments around the world, and how you can help asylum seekers right now. Global Citizen: What initially drew you to working in a refugee shelter? Ali Fitzgerald: It was totally by chance. I was interested in teaching comics because I believe in comics as a really potent form of communication that can help people. Visual communication and narrative will become increasingly important in the next few years because we’re becoming more visual, right? It’s a way to bridge language gaps, class, and education gaps, actually. I was teaching a comics class for women and the director of a shelter approached me, so I had no real intention of doing it. I don’t actually consider it art therapy because I never studied art therapy. It’s also one of the reasons I tried to keep the workshops very open and not hierarchical. Drawing is often linked to just art but that sometimes limits people’s involvement of drawing, because there’s all this weight on it that they have to be good at it, or artistic. But drawing can be therapeutic or a form of catharsis — but I try never to push that or interpret that because it’s not my field — it can also be purely a mode of communication to express yourself. Part of the book is illustrating what drawing can be — drawing can be a multitude of different things for different people. Why did you decide to write this book? One of the things I wanted to do was get into the nooks and crannies of stories and personhood and not talk about the refugee experience as portrayed by the mainstream media, which I think is kind of flattening, generally, because people talk about numbers and movements in ways that can be really depersonalizing. Read More: Syrian refugees using innovation to improve their lives How did your students feel seeing themselves represented in the book? Right before I left Berlin a few weeks ago, I gave the two protagonists, Saker and Michael, copies of the book, I had shown them pages before. They were delighted by it. They were happy to have their names changed because when I asked them about whether or not they wanted their real names, I think Saker said, “When I’m applying for a job, I don’t necessarily want people to know I was living in a refugee shelter.” More or less the people I met were very happy to share their stories, and the stories that were fairly sensational I tried to leave out because I don’t think that’s what this book is about. In this case, I was basically showing people drawing hot air balloons and things like that. Image: Courtesy of Fantagraphics Did you anticipate that there would be so much anti-refugee rhetoric around the world at the time of the book’s release? Generally, the anti-refugee sentiment has been building for a long time. I think the difference is at first it was very fringey and it’s absorbed into the mainstream dialogue, this idea that refugees are villains, and refugees have been villainized. Did you ever worry that taking a more surreal approach to your illustrations would downplay the difficult experiences your students had? I didn’t worry about it — it was a very conscious decision. I wanted to make it very, very clear that it was my viewpoints, that things were being filtered through my very specific, and sometimes flawed, lens. One tool to make sure that’s apparent is these surreal moments, and some of them really illustrate ideas or underline ideas better than reality. Like, there are moments where three young boys are trying to get their papers in the book and it’s sort of based on Waiting for Godot, that kind of bureaucratic absurdity, is best illustrated with a surreal side. Image: Courtesy of Fantagraphics Image: Courtesy of Fantagraphics I would love to see more cartoons in the media. It’s unfortunate that probably the most popular one recently was the caricature of Serena Williams and it went viral for all the wrong reasons. That incident, in particular, shows how pernicious and prevalent caricatures still are in the world of comics and cartoonery. Which is one thing I very actively try to stay away from. What would you recommend to everyday people who would like to help this community but they don’t know how? One way to help is obviously stay engaged, find shelters — but that’s a lot harder in America. In shelters in Europe, there now is a bigger need for volunteers because I think a lot of people stopped doing it a year or two ago. If you’re in a position where you can affect policy, obviously that’s the best, or if you’re a lawyer and you can offer free legal services. Drawing attention to issues is good but in a very sensitive way, obviously. *Names have been changed for privacy. This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity. ____________________________________________________________________________ If you’d like to volunteer or donate to support refugees and asylum-seekers Fitzgerald recommends the following organizations: UNHCR Amnesty International White Helmets TOPICSCitizenshipBerlinSyrian RefugeesRefugeesGermanyBooksAfghan Refugee
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